Ceratosauria Marsh, 1884
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis <- Passer domesticus) (Sereno, in press; modified from Rowe, 1989)
Other definitions- (Liliensternus liliensterni + Coelophysis bauri + "Syntarsus" rhodesiensis + "Syntarsus" kayentakatae + Segisaurus halli + Sarcosaurus woodi + Dilophosaurus wetherilli + Ceratosaurus nasicornis) (Rowe and Gauthier, 1990)
(Coelophysis bauri <- Passer domesticus) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
Comments- Marsh (1884) erected this as a suborder including Ceratosaurus only, though he later (1895) added Ornithomimidae. This taxon was ressurrected in 1984 (published in 1986) by Gauthier to contain coelophysoids, Dilophosaurus and ceratosaurs sensu stricto. This was followed by most phylogenies in the 1990's (e.g. Rowe and Gauthier, 1990; Holtz, 1994; Sereno, 1999; Holtz, 2000). Some non-cladistic phylogenies at the time (Bakker, 1986; Paul, 1984, 1988) advocated ceratosaurs sensu stricto as being closer to birds than coelophysoids and Dilophosaurus, which was suggested in some more recent unpublished analyses (Currie, 1995; Rauhut, 1998; Carrano and Sampson, 1999) and has become the current consensus (Carrano et al., 2002; Rauhut, 2003; Wilson et al., 2003; Carrano et al., 2005; Ezcurra and Novas, 2007; Smith et al., 2007; Ezcurra, 2012). However, a few recent studies (Tykoski and Rowe, 2004; Tykoski, 2004, 2005) have again recovered coelophysoid ceratosaurs. Tykoski (2005) found excluding ontogenetically variable characters (mostly bone fusions) generated trees excluding Coelophysoidea from Ceratosauria. According to Tykoski, excluding these characters and miscoding many others have led to the current concensus. It should be noted that only four more steps are needed to place ceratosaurs closer to tetanurines than to coelophysoids in his trees. Thus, either topology should be considered possible.
References- Marsh, 1884. The classification and affinities of dinosaurian reptiles. Nature. 31, 68-69.
Marsh, 1895. On the affinities and classification of the dinosaurian reptiles. American Journal of Science. 50, 483-498.
Gauthier, 1984. A cladistic analysis of the higher systematic categories of the Diapsida. PhD thesis. University of California, Berkeley. 564 pp.
Paul, 1984. The archosaurs: A phylogenetic study. Third Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, Short Papers. 175-180.
Bakker, 1986. The Dinosaur Heresies. Kensington, New York. 481 pp.
Gauthier, 1986. Saurischian Monophyly and the Origin of Birds. Memoires of the California Academy of Sciences. 8, 1-55.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York. 464 pp.
Rowe, 1989. A new species of the theropod dinosaur Syntarsus from the Early Jurassic Kayenta Formation of Arizona. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 9(2), 125-136.
Bonaparte, Novas and Coria, 1990. Carnotaurus sastrei Bonaparte, the horned, lightly built carnosaur from the Middle Cretaceous of Patagonia. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Contributions in Science. 416, 1-42.
Rowe and Gauthier, 1990. Ceratosauria. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford. 151-168.
Novas, 1992. La evolucion de los dinosaurios carnivoros [The evolution of carnivorous dinosaurs]. In Sanz and Buscalioni (eds.). Los Dinosaurios y Su Entorno Biotico: Actas del Segundo Curso de Paleontologia in Cuenca. Instituto "Juan Valdez", Cuenca, Argentina. 126-163.
Holtz, 1994. The phylogenetic position of the Tyrannosauridae: Implications for theropod systematics. Journal of Paleontology. 68(5), 1100-1117.
Currie, 1995. Phylogeny and systematics of theropods (Dinosauria). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 15(3, 25A.
Rauhut, 1998. Elaphrosaurus bambergi and the early evolution of theropod dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 71A.
Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 210(1), 41-83.
Carrano and Sampson, 1999. Evidence for a paraphyletic 'Ceratosauria' and it’s implications for theropod dinosaur evolution. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(3), 36A.
Padian, Hutchinson and Holtz, 1999. Phylogenetic definitions and nomenclature of the major taxonomic categories of the carnivorous Dinosauria (Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(1), 69-80.
Sereno, 1999. The evolution of dinosaurs. Science. 284, 2137-2147.
Holtz, 2000. A new phylogeny of the carnivorous dinosaurs. Gaia. 15, 5-61.
Carrano, Sampson and Forster, 2002. The osteology of Masiakasaurus knopfleri, a small abelisauroid (Dinosauria:Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology. 22(3), 510-534.
Rauhut, 2003. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropod dinosaurs. Special Papers in Palaeontology. 69, 1-213.
Wilson, Sereno, Srivastava, Bhatt, Khosla and Sahni, 2003. A new abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lameta Formation (Cretaceous, Maastrichtian) of India. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology. The University of Michigan. 31, 1-42.
Tykoski, 2004. Ontogenetic stage assessment and the position of Coelophysoidea within basal Theropoda. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 7A-8A.
Tykoski and Rowe, 2004. Ceratosauria. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 47-70.
Carrano, Hutchinson and Sampson, 2005. New information on Segisaurus halli, a small theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of Arizona. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(4), 835–849.
Tykoski, 2005. Anatomy, ontogeny and phylogeny of coelophysoid theropods. PhD thesis. University of Texas at Austin. 553 pp.
Ezcurra and Novas, 2007. Phylogenetic relationships of the Triassic theropod Zupaysaurus rougieri from NW Argentina. Historical Biology. 19(1), 35-72.
Smith, Makovicky, Hammer and Currie, 2007. Osteology of Cryolophosaurus ellioti (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Early Jurassic of Antarctica and implications for early theropod evolution. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 151, 377-421.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The Phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Ezcurra, 2012. Phylogenetic analysis of Late Triassic - Early Jurassic neotheropod dinosaurs: Implications for the early theropod radiation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 91.

“Merosaurus” Welles, Powell and Pickering vide Pickering, 1995
“M. newmani” Welles, Powell and Pickering vide Pickering, 1995
Hettangian-Early Sinemurian, Early Jurassic
Blue Lias Formation, England

Material- (GSM 109560) partial femur (~380 mm), partial tibia (lost)
Other diagnoses- Pickering (1995b) considered "Merosaurus" to be "very similar to Sarcosaurus" but distinguished it based on several characters. The absent trochanteric shelf is known to vary dimorphically in ceratosaur and coelophysoid taxa. The remaining ventral portion of the femoral head is not angled more medially, the fourth trochanter is not medially concave, and is more medially placed not less so. Lateromedial placement of the fourth trochanter is highly variable within theropod taxa, so cannot be used to diagnose "Merosaurus" in any case.
Comments- Owen received the partial hindlimbs BMNH 39496 and GSM 109560 in 1858 and used them as the basis for his dinosaur genus Scelidosaurus in an encyclopedia entry the following year. While this is often claimed to be an nomen nudum (e.g. Newman, 1968), genus names published before 1931 do not require species names or illustrations to be valid (ICZN Article 12). Owen later (1861) gave his taxon the species name harrisonii and described it in detail, referring the ungual GSM 109561, a partial postcranium in the Lyme Regis Museum, and the skull of BMNH R1111. Lydekker (1888) made BMNH 39496 the type specimen, though the basal thyreophoran BMNH R1111 (whose postcranium was soon found and described in 1862) formed the basis for peoples' ideas of Scelidosaurus. Newman (1968) believed BMNH 39496 and GSM 109560 to be megalosaurids. However, they were only compared to Megalosaurus among theropods, making this familial assignment in need of verification. As the name Scelidosaurus had been associated with the thyreophoran, Charig and Newman (1994) petitioned the ICZN to recognize BMNH R1111 as the lectotype, which was accepted in 1994 as Opinion 1788. Welles and Powell studied the theropod material in 1974 for their unpublished European theropod paper, intending to name it Merosaurus newmani. This was first found in publically available print in 1995 when Pickering credited the name to Welles, Powell and Pickering in an unpublished bibliographic manuscript. In that same year, Pickering printed a packet with a full description of the taxon, which he credited to only Welles and Powell (though its osteology was also credited to himself). This is a nomen nudum however, as he didn't follow ICZN Article 8.1.3- it must have been produced in an edition containing simultaneously obtainable copies by a method that assures numerous identical and durable copies. Pickering intends GSM 109560 to be the type, and referred BMNH 39496 and GSM 109561. He considered it a probable ceratosaur sensu lato metataxon. Pickering will describe it in his in progress work Mutanda Dinosaurologica. Naish and Martill (2007) referred all three specimens to Tetanurae without comment. Most recently, Benson (2009, 2010) redescribed BMNH 39496 and GSM 109560. He considered GSM 109560 to be an indeterminate theropod.
GSM 109560 is based on a femur lacking the head and distal end, and a tibial shaft which was not illustrated by Owen and has been lost. Contra Owen and Pickering, there is no reason to refer this to the same taxon as BMNH 39496 as they share only a short area of distal shaft, and the GSM specimen is only ~60% as large. Also contra Pickering, the anterior trochanter is not conical but is lateromedially narrower than anteroposteriorly, making it alariform. The specimen is not a robust coelophysoid or ceratosaur individual based on the absence of a ridge-like trochanteric shelf. It is most similar to Liliensternus, Dilophosaurus, Ceratosaurus and tetanurines in having a straight shaft in anterior view. The anteroposterior width of the anterior trochanter seems less than in tetanurines, but greater than basal coelophysoids. It may be a gracile morph of ceratosaur.
References- Owen, 1859. Palaeontology. Encyclopaedia Britannica, Edition 8. 17, 91-176.
Owen, 1861. Monograph of the fossil Reptilia of the Liassic formations. Part I. A monograph of the fossil dinosaur (Scelidosaurus harrisonii Owen) of the Lower Lias. Palaeontolographical Society Monographs. 13, 1-14.
Owen, 1862. Monographs on the British Fossil Reptilia from the Oolitic Formations. Part second, containing Scelidosaurus harrisonii and Pliosaurus grandis. Palaeontolographical Society Monographs. 1-16.
Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Newman, 1968. The Jurassic dinosaur Scelidosaurus harrisoni Owen. Palaeontology. 11, 40-43.
Charig and Newman, 1992. Scelidosaurus harrisonii Owen, 1861 (Reptilia, Ornithischia): Proposed replacement in inappropriate lectotype. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 49, 280-283.
ICZN, 1994. Opinion 1788. Scelidosaurus harrisonii Owen, 1861 (Reptilia, Ornithischia): Lectotype replaced. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 51(3), 288.
Pickering, 1995a. Jurassic Park: Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, 2nd revised printing. Capitola, California. 478 pp.
Pickering, 1995b. An extract from: Archosauromorpha: Cladistics and osteologies. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project. 11 pp.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Dec/msg00193.html
Naish and Martill, 2007. Dinosaurs of Great Britain and the role of the Geological Society of London in their discovery: Basal Dinosauria and Saurischia. Journal of the Geological Society. 164, 493-510.
Benson, 2009. The taxonomy, systematics and evolution of the British theropod dinosaur Megalosaurus. PhD thesis. University of Cambridge. [? pp]
Benson, 2010. The osteology of Magnosaurus nethercombensis (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) of the United Kingdom and a re-examination of the oldest records of tetanurans. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(1), 131-146.
Pickering, in prep. Mutanda Dinosaurologica.

"Ngexisaurus" Zhao, 1983
"N. dapukaensis" Zhao, 1985
= "Ngexisaurus changduensis" Zhao and Cheng, 1985
= "Ngexisaurus dapukanensis" Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004
Middle Jurassic
Middle Dapuka Group, Tibet, China

Comments- This specimen was first reported by Zhao (1983) who while discussing the evolution of dinosaurs in China noted "coelurosaurs (Ngexisaurus Chao)" in the Middle Jurassic. Lacking a description, illustration or species name, it was a nomen nudum. Zhao seems to place all Jurassic coelurosaurs in Coeluridae and states in Middle Jurassic coelurosaurs the tooth "crown becomes thinner with serrated anterior edge only". This may indicate the "Ngexisaurus" material includes teeth with this morphology. Zhao used a classic concept of Coelurosauria, which only tells us "Ngexisaurus" is probably a small theropod. As with other new Tibetan taxa listed by Zhao (1983), it was probably supposed to be described by Zhao in the published version of his doctoral dissertation "The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China", in the second Palaeontology of Xizang volume. Yet this volume is only referenced by Zhao (1983; which was submitted in September 1981) and seems never to have been printed, though the previous volume was published by the IVPP in 1980 and the third by the NIGP in 1981. Olshevsky (DML, 1999) notes the IVPP rejected the paper as unpublishable. Zhao (1985) lists the new species Ngexisaurus dapukaensis as a coelurosaur from the Middle Jurassic Dabuka Group of Tibet, but again with no description or illustration. In the same volume, Zhao and Cheng (1985) list the species as Ngexisaurus changduensis instead. Zhang and Li (1997) also list it as Ngexisaurus changduensis, from the Middle Dabuka Formation of Dabuka, Qamdo County, Xizang. Weishampel et al. (2004) list it as Ngexisaurus dapukanensis from the Dapuka Group of Xinjiang, Uygur Zizhiqu and refer it to Ceratosauria (sensu lato). Its assignment to Ceratosauria by Weishampel et al. (note Zhao is a coauthor) may indicate it is a ceratosaur sensu stricto (since coelophysoids were extinct by the Middle Jurassic). Perhaps it is similar to small early ceratosaurs like Limusaurus and Berberosaurus, but this is only conjecture. It is listed as Ngexisaurus changduensis Zhao gen. et sp. nov. (MS) in Fang et al. (2006), suggesting that Zhao's monograph was indeed never published and is still a manuscript. They refer it to Procompsognathidae (or perhaps basal Compsognathidae). Which species name will be used for it when it is published is uncertain.
References- Zhao, "1983" [unpublished]. The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China. The Series of the Scientific Expeditions to the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Palaeontology of Xizang. 2, 1-200.
Zhao, 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 28(1-2), 295-306.
Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Zhao and Cheng, 1985. The Qamdo-Simao Subregion. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 174-179.
Zhang and Li, 1997. Mesozoic Dinosaur Localities in China and Their Stratigraphy. In Wolberg, Sump and Rosenberg (eds.). Dinofest International, Proceedings of a Symposium sponsered by Arizona State University. A Publication of The Academy of Natural Sciences. 265-273.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria: Second Edition. 517-606.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

Berberosaurus Allain, Tykoski, Aquesbi, Jalil, Monbaron, Russell and Taquet, 2007
B. liassicus Allain, Tykoski, Aquesbi, Jalil, Monbaron, Russell and Taquet, 2007
Pliensbachian-Toarcian, Early Jurassic
Upper bone-bed of the Toundoute continental series, Morocco
Holotype
- (MHNM-Pt9) (subadult) cervical vertebra (~53 mm)
....(MHNM-Pt16) distal tibia
....(MHNM-Pt19) incomplete femur (~505 mm)
....(MHNM-Pt20) fibula (447 mm)
....(MHNM-Pt21) proximal tibia
....(MHNM-Pt22) metacarpal II (78 mm)
....(MHNM-Pt23) partial third sacral centrum, fourth sacral centrum (64 mm), incomplete fifth sacral vertebra (70 mm)
Paratype- (MHNM-Tol-218) proximal femur (~408 mm)
Diagnosis- (from Allain et al., 2007) differs from Elaphrosaurus in: short cervical centra; pneumatic foramina on the cervical neural arch.
from Ceratosaurus in: camerate structure of cervical vertebra; low and short neural spine of the cervical vertebra; femoral anterior trochanter reaches proximally to mid-point of femoral head.
from Spinostropheus in: absence of the epipophyseal-prezygapophyseal lamina on the cervical neural arches; short cervical neural spine.
from Abelisauria in: distal end of metacarpal with deep extensor pits; pronounced femoral trochanteric shelf.
Comments- Originally identified as a basal abelisauroid by Allain et al. (2007), Carrano and Sampson (2008) found it to be a basal ceratosaur outside Neoceratosauria instead.
References- Allain, Tykoski, Aquesbi, Jalil, Monbaron, Russell and Taquet, 2007. An abelisauroid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Early Jurassic of the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco, and the radiation of ceratosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 610-624.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The Phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.

Camarillasaurus Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton, 2014
= "Camarillasaurus" Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton, online 2012
C. cirugedae Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton, 2014
= "Camarillasaurus cirugedae" Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton, online 2012
Early Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Camarillas Formation, Aragon, Spain
Holotype
- (MPG-KPC1-46) (adult) partial lateral tooth, possible partial anterior cervical centrum, partial posterior cervical vertebra, posterior cervical or anterior dorsal neural arch fragment, partial anterior-mid dorsal centrum, partial ~fifth dorsal vertebra (115 mm), partial posterior dorsal centrum, incomplete dorsal neural arch, three ?dorsal neural spine fragments, incomplete first or second dorsal rib, dorsal rib fragments, fused second-fourth sacral centra, two partial sacral centra, four partial proximal caudal centra, proximal caudal central fragment, mid caudal vertebra, incomplete mid caudal vertebra, two incomplete distal caudal vertebra, incomplete proximal chevron, partial proximal chevron, partial scapulocoracoid, incomplete sterna (~230, 228 mm), proximal tibia, fragments
Diagnosis- (after Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton, in press) extremely long tibia proximal end, with ratio of anteroposterior/mediolateral axis of 2.8; tibia with a narrow and deep longitudinal groove placed anterior to the crista fibularis on the medial surface; caudal vertebrae with articular surfaces that have well developed edges and are unusually broad; chevron with a deep broad longitudinal groove along the length of the shaft arising from a fossa placed below the haemal canal on the anterior and posterior side; articular surface on the distal end of the chevron blade.
Comments- Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton (2014) found this to be a basal ceratosaur more derived than Limusaurus, but less than Elaphrosaurus, Spinostropheus and neoceratosaurs.
Reference- Sanchez-Hernandez and Benton, 2014. Filling the ceratosaur gap: A new ceratosaurian theropod from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 59(3), 581–600.

unnamed Ceratosauria (Galton, 1982)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado, US

Material- (DMNH 36284) proximal tibia (Chure, 2001)
?(USNM 8414) metatarsal III, metatarsal IV (Pickering, 1995)
(USNM 8415) humerus (201 mm) (Galton, 1982)
Middle Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US

? material (Turner and Peterson, 1999)
Comments- The humerus USNM 8415 was discovered in 1883 and initially referred to Dryosaurus, though Galton (1982) described it and referred it to Elaphrosaurus sp. based on the straight shaft and low deltopectoral crest. Pickering (1995b) referred it to his new taxon ?Elaphrosaurus "philtippettensis" without justification. Neither listed any characters to differentiate it from E. bambergi. Carrano and Sampson (2008) thought the specimen was ceratosaurian, but could find no characters shared specifically with Elaphrosaurus. Indeed, the straight shaft is present in all ceratosaurs, while the low deltopectoral crest is present in Limusaurus and abelisaurians as well. The proximal articular surface is wider than Limusaurus, but less so than abelisaurians. The flattened distal condyles are also more derived than Limusaurus, while Spinostropheus is intermediate. The internal tuberosity is well developed as in Ceratosaurus and abelisaurids, but unlike Limusaurus, Elaphrosaurus, Spinostropheus and Masiakasaurus. The deltopectoral crest apex is placed more distally (42%) than Elaphrosaurus, Limusaurus and especially Ceratosaurus and Masiakasaurus, but is more proximal than abelisaurids. Based on these comparisons, I agree the humerus cannot be assigned to Elaphrosaurus.
USNM 8414 was discovered in 1883 and is assigned to Elaphrosaurus sp. on the USNM collections website, though it has not been mentioned in the literature to my knowledge. Pickering (1995b) referred it to his species Elaphrosaurus "philtippettensis" without comment. Until these are illustrated or described, their affinities remain unknown.
DMNH 36284 is a proximal tibia that was collected in 1992 and first published in a faunal list by Carpenter (1998) as Elaphrosaurus sp.. Chure (2001) later described it as Elaphrosaurus, though Carrano and Sampson (2008) believed it resembled Tendaguru abelisauroid tibiae more.
Turner and Peterson (1999) listed Elaphrosaurus sp. from the Poison Creek Quarry of the Morrison Formation in Wyoming (either from Erickson pers. comm. 1994 or Foster pers. comm. 1997), but this has yet to be described.
References- Galton, 1982. Elaphrosaurus, an ornithomimid dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of North America and Africa. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 56, 265-275.
Pickering, 1995a. Jurassic Park: Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, 2nd revised printing. Capitola, California. 478 pp.
Pickering, 1995b. An extract from: Archosauromorpha: Cladistics and osteologies. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project. 2 pp.
Carpenter, 1998. Vertebrate biostratigraphy of the Morrison Formation near Canon City, Colorado. Modern Geology. 23, 407-426.
Turner and Peterson, 1999. Biostratigraphy of dinosaurs in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the Western Interior, U.S.A. In Gillette (ed.). Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication. 99-1, 77-114.
Chure, 2001. The second record of the African theropod Elaphrosaurus (Dinosauria, Ceratosauria) from the Western Hemisphere. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Monatshefte. 2001(9), 565-576.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.

unnamed ceratosaur (Raath and McIntosh, 1987)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Kadze Formation, Zimbabwe

Material- (QG 65) two femora
Comments- Raath and McIntosh (1987) identified these femora as ?allosaurid, but Rauhut and Lopez-Arbarello (2008) considered them to be ceratosaurian due to the low, aliform anterior trochanter and well-developed trochanteric shelf. They are under study by Roberts, O’Connor and Carrano.
Reference- Raath and McIntosh, 1987. Sauropod dinosaurs from the central Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe, and the age of the Kadzi Formation. South African Journal of Geology. 90(2), 107-119.
Rauhut and López-Arbarello, 2008. Archosaur evolution during the Jurassic: A southern perspective. Revista de la Asociación Geológica Argentina. 63(4), 557-585.

unnamed possible ceratosaurian (Bonaparte, 1996)
Late Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Rayoso Formation, Neuquen, Argentina

Material- (Melo coll.) distal metatarsal III (~250 mm)
Comments- Assigned to ?Ceratosauria indet. by Bonaparte (1996).
Reference- Bonaparte, 1996. Cretaceous tetrapods of Argentina. Muncher Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlung A. 30, 73-130.

unnamed possible ceratosaur (Fitzgerald, Carrano, Holland, Wagstaff, Pickering, Rich and Vickers-Rich, 2012)
Early Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Wonthoggi Formation of Strzelecki Group, Victoria, Australia

Material- (NMV P221202) tibial fragment, astragalocalcaneum (60 mm wide)
Comments- Fitzgerald et al. (2012) described this and referred it to Ceratosauria, most similar to Elaphrosaurus, Deltadromeus and noasaurids. Novas et al. (2013) questioned this identification, only placing it as Neotheropoda indet..
References- Fitzgerald, Carrano, Holland, Wagstaff, Pickering, Rich and Vickers-Rich, 2012. First ceratosaurian dinosaur from Australia. Naturwissenschaften. 99, 397-405.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.

undescribed possible ceratosaur (Perez Garcia, Bolet, Escaso, Houssaye, de Miguel Chaves, Mocho, Narvaez, Torices, Vidal and Ortega, 2015)
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Armuna, Segovia, Spain
Material
- teeth and postcrania
Comments- Said to be a "probable undetermined ceratosaur."
Reference- Perez Garcia, Bolet, Escaso, Houssaye, de Miguel Chaves, Mocho, Narvaez, Torices, Vidal and Ortega, 2015. The vertebrate fauna from the Upper Campanian site of Armuna (Segovia province, central Spain). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2015, 193.

unnamed possible ceratosaur (Serrano-Martinez, Ortega, Sciscio, Tent-Manclus, Bandera and Knoll, 2015)
Bathonian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Tiouraren Formation of the Irhazer Group, Niger

Material- (TP4-4) tooth (41.1x20.9x9.6 mm)
Comments- This grouped with Ceratosaurus when examined morphometrically, and may belong to Spinostropheus.
Reference- Serrano-Martinez, Ortega, Sciscio, Tent-Manclus, Bandera and Knoll, 2015. New theropod remains from the Tiourarén Formation (?Middle Jurassic, Niger) and their bearing on the dental evolution in basal tetanurans. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 126(1), 107-118.

Deltadromeus Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996
D. agilis Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kem Kem beds, Morocco

Holotype- (SGM-Din 2) (~8.1 m) partial cervical rib, two anterior dorsal neural arches, two partial dorsal ribs, two gastralia, partial caudal vertebrae 3-17 (130 mm), caudal vertebrae 20-27 (130 mm), eight chevrons, proximal scapula, incomplete coracoid, incomplete humerus (~328 mm), proximal radius, proximal ulna, partial ilium, pubic fragments?, partial ischia, femur (740 mm), incomplete tibia (~700 mm), incomplete fibula, partial astragalus, calcaneum, metatarsal II (417 mm), phalanx II-1 (140 mm), pedal ungual II (80 mm), metatarsal III (450 mm), phalanx III-1 (140 mm), metatarsal IV (400 mm), phalanx IV-1 (98 mm), phalanx IV-3 (52 mm), phalanx IV-4 (37 mm), metatarsal V (100 mm)
Reffered- ?(JP Cr681) distal femur (Singer, 2015 online)
?(JP Cr685) metatarsal III (Singer, 2015 online)
Comments- Sereno et al. (1996) described Deltadromeus as a basal coelurosaur, but Rauhut (2003) found it to be an ornithomimosaur. More recently, Wilson et al. (2003) and Tortosa et al. (2014) recovered it as a noasaurid, while Carrano and Sampson (2008) found it to be a basal ceratosaur outside of Neoceratosauria.
Sereno et al. (1996) referred the Baharija 'IPHG 1912 VIII' (described by Stromer, 1934) to Deltadromeus, specifying a coracoid, pubes, femur, proximal tibia and fibula as the material. Yet this specimen number corresponds to numerous specimens described by Stromer. The coracoid IPHG 1912 VIII 60 was associated with a scapula that shares that number, the femur is IPHG 1912 VII 69 based on the size Sereno et al. reported, and the fibula must be IPHG 1912 VIII 70 as no others are reported. Yet the pectoral girdle was found in layer m while the femur and fibula were found in layer p. The only proximal tibia reported is IPHG 1912 VIII 78, which is far too small to belong with the other hindlimb elements and from a different locality. Finally, the only pubes with that number are IPHG 1912 VIII 81, which are from yet another locality and much smaller than even the tibia. This materials list agrees with Carrano and Sampson, though note contrary to their statement, it is not a "partial postcranial skeleton". Stromer used the pubes as a paratype of Bahariasaurus, questionably referred the pectoral girdle, femur and fibula to the taxon as they cannot be compared to the holotype, and referred the tibia to aff. Erectopus. Thus all material was not referred to Bahariasaurus, contra Sereno et al.. The Baharija pectoral girdle actually lacks the anteroposterior expansion considered diagnostic for Deltadromeus by Sereno (length excluding posteroventral process 117% of height vs. 150% in Deltadromeus), which is also found in Elaphrosaurus and Limusaurus. Due to breakage of the posteroventral process, it's uncertain if the coracoid's subacromial notch ('notch in anterior margin' of Sereno et al., as it is the only notch in Deltadromeus' coracoid) is shallow as in Deltadromeus or deeper as in Elaphrosaurus and Limusaurus. Though again, a shallow notch might not be diagnostic of Deltadromeus as it is also found in Ceratosaurus. The pectoral girdles also differ in other ways if scaled to similar overall size, with Deltadromeus having a narrower scapular shaft, a more abruptly expanded acromion, smaller glenoid, and deeper posteroventral process. IPHG 1912 VIII 60 most closely resembles Baryonyx, so may be spinosaurid. Sereno et al. also diagnose Deltadromeus based on its "accessory trochanter" on the distal femoral shaft, which is presumably the mediodistal crest anteriorly. This is common in basal theropods like ceratosaurs (e.g. Berberosaurus, Elaphrosaurus, Limusaurus), but rarer in Coelurosauria which Sereno et al. referred Deltadromeus too. The development of the mediodistal crest is unclear in the Baharija femur. Carrano and Sampson (2008) equated the "accessory trochanter" of Sereno et al. to the M. adductor femoris 1 insertion scar on the posteromedial distal shaft, but this region is unillustrated in the Baharija femur. Finally, the Bajarija femur does have an anterior process on the lateral margin of its medial condyle, stated as diagnostic of Deltadromeus and hinted at in Sereno et al.'s skeletal reconstruction. Carrano and Sampson equated this with the mediodistal crest discussed above, but that projects largely laterally so is probably not the feature Sereno et al. had in mind. While the anterior process could indicate a relationship between the Baharija femur and Deltadromeus, the latter differs in having a fully medially oriented head and an anterior trochanter that extends distally to the fourth trochanter. The Baharija femur is 165% the size of Deltadromeus, which could lead to questions of ontogenetic change, but neither of these characters are known to change ontogenetically in theropods, and they would leave the older specimen with the more basal morphology, which is unlike at least some theropods (tyrannosaurids, dromaeosaurids). As IPHG 1912 VII 69 has an accessory trochanter, it is probably an avetheropod, so not referrable to Deltadromeus. Chiarenza and Cau (2016) describe additional differences and also question Sereno et al.'s referral. The tibiae are more similar to each other than to Elaphrosaurus, Camarillasaurus, Ceratosaurus, Eoabelisaurus or Erectopus in proximal view (the only available for Deltadromeus), with Deltadromeus differing in having a smaller, triangular posterior groove and larger lateral condyle. The fibulae are roughly similar, though Deltadromeus has a more projected anteroproximal corner and a proximomedial fossa that is less proximally extensive. The supposed pubes of Deltadromeus are actually ischia (see below), so cannot be compared to the Baharija pubes. Thus in total, the pectoral girdle and femur are near certainly not Deltadromeus (contrary to Sereno et al.'s claim the remains are identical), the tibia and fibula could be although no described apomorphies are shared, and the pubes cannot be compared. Because none of the Bajarija material can be said to be more similar to Deltadromeus than the sympatric Bahariasaurus and some are certainly not Deltadromeus, none should be referred to either genus. This also eliminates any evidence Deltadromeus reached gigantic sizes, as there is no evidence the holotype is immature and the completely fused ischial boot would argue against this.
The supposed pubis of Deltadromeus' holotype seems to be an ischium (Longrich, DML 2000; Carrano and Sampson, 2008). The shape of the distal boot is almost identical to IPHG 1912 VIII 82 (a pair of ischia referred to Theropoda indet. by Stromer and also misidentified as pubes), except that it's slightly shorter in the latter. As Longrich describes (pers. comm. posted here), the anterior surface is transversely convex unlike pubes, the conjoined shafts are narrow transversely instead of having a pubic apron, the boot is completely fused, and he identified what appeared to be pubic fragments in the Deltadromeus holotype.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharije-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 22, 1-79.
Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996. Predatory dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous faunal differentiation. Science. 272(5264), 986-991.
Longrich, DML 2000. http://dml.cmnh.org/2000Nov/msg00067.html
Rauhut, 2003. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropod dinosaurs. Special Papers in Palaeontology. 69, 1-213.
Wilson, Sereno, Srivastava, Bhatt, Khosla and Sahni, 2003. A new abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lameta Formation (Cretaceous, Maastrichtian) of India. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology. The University of Michigan. 31, 1-42.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Singer, 2015 online. JuraPark na tropie nowych dinozaurow z Maroka. http://jurapark.pl/jurapark-na-tropie-nowych-dinozaurow-z-maroka/
Chiarenza and Cau, 2016. A large abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Morocco and comments on the Cenomanian theropods from North Africa. PeerJ. 4:e1754.

Gualicho Apesteguía, Smith, Juárez Valieri and Makovicky, 2016
= "Nototyrannus" Anonymous, online 2011 vide Apesteguía, Smith, Juárez Valieri and Makovicky, 2016
= Aoniraptor Motta, Aranciaga Rolando, Rozadilla, Agnolin, Chimento, Brisson Egli and Novas, 2016
G. shinyae Apesteguía, Smith, Juárez Valieri and Makovicky, 2016
= "Nototyrannus violantei" Anonymous, online 2011 vide Apesteguía, Smith, Juárez Valieri and Makovicky, 2016
= Aoniraptor libertatum Motta, Aranciaga Rolando, Rozadilla, Agnolin, Chimento, Brisson Egli and Novas, 2016
Cenomanian-Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Huincul Formation of the Rio Limay Subgroup, Rio Negro, Argentina
Holotype
- (MPCN PV 0001) four incomplete dorsal centra (92, 104, ~80 mm), 16-17 partial gastralial rows, three incomplete mid caudal vertebrae (72, 83 mm), incomplete scapulocoracoid (scapula ~439 mm), humerus (286 mm), radii (155.4, 152.8 mm), ulnae (166.8 mm), semilunate carpal, ?ulnare, fused metacarpal I and II (I- 50.3, II- 81.7 mm), phalanx I-1 (64.8 mm), manual ungual I (60.6 mm), phalanx II-1 (31.1 mm), phalanx II-2 (35.9 mm), incomplete manual ungual II, incomplete metacarpal III, incomplete pubes (~355 mm), femora (one distal; 775 mm), proximal tibia, proximal fibula, distal metatarsal II, phalanx II-1 (95.3 mm), phalanx II-2 (64.3 mm), incomplete pedal ungual II, metatarsals III (one distal; 309 mm), phalanx III-1 (104.3 mm), phalanx III-2 (79.1 mm), phalanx III-3 (54.8 mm), pedal ungual III (58.1 mm), phalanx IV-1 (73.4 mm), phalanx IV-2 (55.4 mm), phalanx IV-3 (54.1 mm), phalanx IV-4 (32.4 mm), pedal ungual IV
Referred- (MPCA-Pv 804/1-25; holotype of Aoniraptor libertatum) (~6 m) incomplete last sacral vertebra, incomplete first caudal vertebra, second caudal centrum, third caudal centrum, two proximal neural arches, five proximal-mid caudal vertebrae, three partial proximal-mid caudal neural arches, five distal-mid caudal vertebrae, distal caudal vertebra, three proximal chevrons, two mid chevrons (Motta et al., 2016)
Diagnosis- (after Apesteguia et al., 2016) Posterior dorsal vertebrae very elongated and with slit-like pneumatic openings; scapular blade narrow with sinuous dorsal margin marked by shallow notch between acromion and blade; forelimb foreshortened with reduced muscle attachments and articulations; first and second metacarpals coossified proximally, third metacarpal reduced to splint; pubes with little or no pubic apron; pubes with blade-like boot; femur with mediodorsally inclined head; reduced femoral distal condyles; fibula with large fossa and accessory flange on proximoposterior corner; ridge-like m. iliofibularis tubercle of fibula; third metatarsal antarctometatarsal; pedal unguals with single claw sheath grooves that define small spur or tuber near proximal end.
(after Motta et al., 2016 for Aoniraptor libertatum) proximal-mid caudal vertebrae with fan-shaped prezygapophyses lacking discernible articular surface; blunt and thick process on lateral surface of proximal-mid caudal prezygapophyses; distal-mid caudals with pair of non-articular flat surfaces on the posterodorsal corner of the centrum.
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 2007 and partially excavated by Apesteguia et al., but a team from the Museo Patagónico de Ciencias Naturales and Museum of Sao Paulo improperly collected it in 2009 (Apesteguia, online 2011). In 2011, Museo Patagonico announced the find to the media (Anonymous online, 2011), though whether the name made it into any paper media is unknown. Apesteguia et al. (2016) did list Nototyrannus violantei as a nomen nudum which Gualicho shinyae replaced. The collection and respository issues were resolved, resulting in the publication in 2016. Near simultaneously, Motta et al. (2016) released the online version of their paper describing near identical remains from the same locality as Aoniraptor libertatum. Their synonymy was quickly recognized (the first outside social media being Cau, 2016 online), with the senior synonym being established by McFeeters (2016 online). Specifically, the electronic version of Motta et al.'s paper lacks a ZooBank registration (ICZN Article 8.5.3) and its physical version was not available for about two weeks afterward, whereas Apesteguia et al.'s description did have a ZooBank registration. Thus Gualicho has priority over Aoniraptor.
The phylogenetic affinities of Gualicho are highly controversial, though both Apesteguia et al. (2016) and Motta et al. (2016) agree it is closely related to the similarly problematic Deltadromeus. The initial media announcement proclaimed the specimen to be a tyrannosauroid, and Motta et al. proposed it, Deltadromeus and Bahariasaurus may constitute a clade of non-megaraptorid megaraptorans, which they place as basal tyrannosauroids. This was done without a cladistic analysis. Apesteguia et al. found both Gualicho and Deltadromeus emerged as a clade of non-megaraptoran neovenatorids, which they recovered as carcharodontosaur carnosaurs in a modified version of Carrano et al.'s tetanurine analysis. However, when added to a version of Novas et al.'s tetanurine analysis, Gualicho and Chilantaisaurus formed a clade of basal coelurosaurs closer to birds than carcharodontosaurids or Neovenator, but outside the clade of Megaraptora+Tyrannoraptora. Neither analysis strongly sampled ceratosaurian characters, which Apesteguia et al. reported several of in Gualicho, and where Deltadromeus has been generally assigned since the mid-2000s. Only future studies with more data will determine whether Gualicho and Deltadromeus are ceratosaurs, carnosaurs or coelurosaurs, and whether Bahariasaurus or Chilantaisaurus are closely related as well.
References- Anonymous, online 2011. Presentan al "primo" del Tyrannosaurus. RioNegro.com.ar. 8-12-2011.
Apesteguia, online 2011. http://dml.cmnh.org/2011Aug/msg00348.html
Apesteguía, Makovicky, Smith and Juárez Valieri, 2013. A new theropod with a didactyl manus and African affinities from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina. VIII Congreso Latinoamericano de Paleontología and XIII Congreso Mexicano de Paleontología. [pp]
Apesteguía, Smith, Juárez Valieri and Makovicky, 2016. An unusual new theropod with a didactyl manus from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina. PLoS ONE. 11(7), e0157793.
Cau, online 2016. http://theropoda.blogspot.com/2016/07/nuovi-resti-di-aoniraptor-ehm-benvenuto.html
McFeeters, online 2016. http://theropoda.blogspot.com/2016/07/nuovi-resti-di-aoniraptor-ehm-benvenuto.html?showComment=1468648523536#c8078659669901164015
Motta, Aranciaga Rolando, Rozadilla, Agnolin, Chimento, Brisson Egli and Novas, 2016. New theropod fauna from the Upper Cretaceous (Huincul Formtation) of northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. In Khosla and Lucas (eds.). Cretaceous period: Biotic diversity and biogeography. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 71, 231-253.

Spinostropheus Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004
S. gautieri (Lapparent, 1960) Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004
= Elaphrosaurus gautieri Lapparent, 1960
Bathonian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Tiouraren Formation of the Irhazer Group, Niger

Lectotype- (MNHN 1961-28; from In Tedrift) cervical vertebra (80 mm)
Paralectotypes- ?(MNHN coll.; from In Tedrift) (many individuals) two anterior dorsal vertebrae (70, 80 mm), posterior dorsal vertebra (50 mm), four dorsal fragments, three sacral fragments, three caudal vertebrae (80-85 mm), two caudal fragments, partial humerus (200 mm), ulna (300 mm), distal pubis, distal femur, incomplete tibia, incomplete fibula, proximal metatarsal, four metatarsal fragments, partial pedal phalanx
?(MNHN coll.; from, In Tedrift) cervical neural arch, two dorsal vertebrae, two sacral vertebrae (140 mm), partial caudal vertebra, three manual unguals (40, 45, 60 mm), tibiae (700 mm), distal fibula, proximal metatarsal, four pedal phalangeal fragments
Referred- (MNN TIG6; from Fako) posterior third cervical vertebra, fourth cervical vertebra, fifth cervical vertebra, sixth cervical vertebra, seventh cervical vertebra, eighth cervical vertebra, ninth cervical vertebra, tenth cervical vertebra, cervical rib, first dorsal vertebra, second dorsal vertebra, third dorsal vertebra, fourth dorsal vertebra, fifth dorsal vertebra, sixth dorsal vertebra, seventh dorsal vertebra, eighth dorsal vertebra, partial ninth dorsal vertebra, partial tenth dorsal vertebra, partial eleventh dorsal vertebra, partial twelfth dorsal vertebra, partial thirteenth dorsal vertebra, fragmentary dorsal ribs, first sacral neural arch, second sacral neural arch, third sacral neural arch, ossified tendons (Sereno et al., 2004)
Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Tegama Group, Niger

Paralectotype- ?(MNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) proximal metatarsal
Diagnosis- (after Sereno et al., 2004) strongly canted anterior articular face on mid cervical centra (30 degree angle to posterior articular face); partitioned anterior pleurocoels in mid-cervical centra; dorsoventrally flattened epipophyseal processes on mid cervical vertebrae; broad subrectangular neural spines on mid cervical vertebrae.
Comments- Though originally identified as Early Cretaceous (Lapparent, 1960), the Tiouraren Formation has been reinterpreted as Bathonian-Oxfordian (Rauhut and Lopez-Arbarello, 2009)
Lapparent referred this species to Elaphrosaurus without reason, distinguishing it from his Elaphrosaurus iguidiensis by its larger size and "the form of the vertebrae" and from E. bambergi based on the supposedly stouter humerus. Lapparent's syntype series for this species consists of numerous unassociated remains from In Tedrift (not mentioned in the list of associated specimens), a proximal metatarsal from In Abangarit, and an associated individual from In Tedrift. Sereno et al. (2004) lists only a cervical from the unassociated In Tedrift remains as the holotype, but this makes it a lectotype, with other material described by Lapparent becoming paralectotypes. New remains were discovered in 1997 or 2000 and presented at SVP 2002 as an abelisaurid. While Sereno et al. state the first bones of Spinostropheus were unspecified vertebrae and two partial limb bones described by Lapparent, no justification for referring other material of Lapparent's to the taxon were given. Indeed, the associated material includes more than two limb bones, and there would be no way to refer the unassociated In Tedreft limb bones to a taxon known otherwise from axial material. Sereno et al. do not include any remains except MNN TIG6 in their codings for Spinostropheus, and find it to be the sister taxon to Abelisauria. Carrano and Sampson (2008) found it to be a basal ceratosaur outside Neoceratosauria.
References- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Memoirs of the Geological Society of France. 88A, 1-57.
Sereno, Conrad and Wilson, 2002. Abelisaurid theropods from Africa: Phylogenetic and biogeographic implications. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 106A.
Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings: Biological Sciences. 271(1546), 1325-1330.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Rauhut and Lopez-Arbarello, 2009. Considerations on the age of the Tiouaren Formation (Iullemmeden Basin, Niger, Africa): Implications for Gondwanan Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate faunas. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 271, 259-267.

Elaphrosaurus Janensch, 1920
Not Elaphrosaurus- Stromer (1934) referred a proximal femur (IPHG 1911 XII 29) and two incomplete tibiae (IPHG 1912 VIII 76 and 192) from the Baharija Formation of Egypt to cf. Elaphrosaurus bambergi, but these belong to tetanurines based on the prominent accessory trochanter and distally placed and well separated fibular crests. Galton (1982) referred a humerus (USNM 8415) from the Morrison Formation of Colorado to Elaphrosaurus sp., but I agree with Carrano and Sampson (2008) that it is not more similar to that taxon than to other ceratosaurs. Pickering (1995a, b) created the nomina nuda ?Elaphrosaurus "philtippettensis" and E. "philtippettorum" with the intended holotype as distal pubes USNM 5737 (also from the Morrison Formation of Colorado), but I agree with Carpenter et al. (2005) that these are more probably referrable to Tanycolagreus. He referred metatarsals II and IV (USNM 8414) from the same locality as USNM 8415 to his species, but these have yet to be described. Similarly, Turner and Peterson (1999) listed Elaphrosaurus sp. from the Poison Creek Quarry of the Morrison Formation in Wyoming, but this material remains undescribed. Chure (2001) described a proximal tibia (DMNH 36284) from the Morrison of Colorado as Elaphrosaurus, but Carrano and Sampson (2008) considered it to resemble unnamed Tendaguru abelisauroid tibiae more. Pol and Rauhut (2012) consider the humerus and tibia to be ceratosaurs more basal than Elaphrosaurus.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharije-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 22, 1-79.
Galton, 1982. Elaphrosaurus, an ornithomimid dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of North America and Africa. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 56, 265-275.
Pickering, 1995a. Jurassic Park: Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, 2nd revised printing. Capitola, California. 478 pp.
Pickering, 1995b. An extract from: Archosauromorpha: Cladistics and osteologies. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project. 2 pp.
Turner and Peterson, 1999. Biostratigraphy of dinosaurs in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the Western Interior, U.S.A. In Gillette (ed.). Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication. 99-1, 77-114.
Chure, 2001. The second record of the African theropod Elaphrosaurus (Dinosauria, Ceratosauria) from the Western Hemisphere. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Monatshefte. 2001(9), 565-576.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Pol and Rauhut, 2012. A Middle Jurassic abelisaurid from Patagonia and the early diversification of theropod dinosaurs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 279(1741), 3170-3175.
E. bambergi Janensch, 1920
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Holotype- (HMN Gr.S. 38-44) (6.2 m, 210 kg) third cervical vertebra (~77 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (~114 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (~120 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (119 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (115 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (112 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (99 mm), first dorsal vertebra (82 mm), second dorsal vertebra (~85 mm), third dorsal vertebra (83 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (84 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (88 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra, tenth dorsal vertebra (~108 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (103 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (96 mm), two partial dorsal ribs, sacrum (88, 76, 50, 42, 49, 64 mm), first caudal vertebra (77 mm), second caudal vertebra (78 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (80 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (76 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (70 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (73 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (73 mm), fourteenth caudal vertebra (71 mm), seventeenth caudal vertebra (70 mm), nineteenth caudal vertebra (71 mm), twenty-third caudal vertebra (82 mm), twenty-fifth caudal vertebra (84 mm), twenty-sixth caudal vertebra (83 mm), twenty-eighth caudal vertebra (80 mm), twenty-ninth caudal vertebra (77 mm), thirty-first caudal vertebra (83 mm), thirty-fifth caudal vertebra, partial chevron, partial scapula, partial coracoid, humerus (262 mm), metacarpal I (31 mm), metacarpal IV (39 mm), ilia (~380 mm), proximal pubis, ischia (354 mm), femur (520 mm), tibia (608 mm), incomplete fibula, astragalus (56 mm wide), metatarsal II (378 mm), phalanx II-1 (100 mm), phalanx II-2 (60 mm), metatarsal III (390 mm), proximal metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-4 (36 mm)
Referred- ?(HMN M.B.R. 1762) manual phalanx II-2 (55 mm) (Janensch, 1925)
(HMN coll.) ninth dorsal vertebra (70 mm) (Janensch, 1925)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Referred- ?(HMN M.B.R. 1755) radius (198 mm) (Janensch, 1929)
?(HMN M.B.R. 1766) distal ischium (Carrano and Sampson, 2008)
Diagnosis- (modified after Rauhut, 2000) cervical vertebrae with thin latero-ventral laminae, bordering the posterior pleurocoel ventrally; cervical vertebrae strongly concave ventrally, the ventral margin arching above the mid-height of the anterior articular facet at its highest point; brevis fossa of ilium extremely widened, so that the brevis shelf forms an almost horizontal lateral flange; distal end of ischium strongly expanded into a triangular boot.
Comments- This species is being redescribed by Rauhut and Carrano (in prep.).
References- Janensch, 1920. Ueber Elaphrosaurus bambergi und die Megalosaurier aus den Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Sitzungsberichte der Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde zu Berlin. 1920, 225-235.
Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. (Supp. 7)1, 1-99.
Janensch, 1929. Ein aufgestelltes und rekonstruiertes Skelett von Elaphrosaurus bambergi mit einem Nachtrag zur Osteologie dieses Coeluro-sauriers. Palaeontographic.a (Supp. 7)1, 279-286.
Galton, 1982. Elaphrosaurus, an ornithomimid dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of North America and Africa. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 56, 265-275.
Rauhut, 1998. Elaphrosaurus bambergi and the early evolution of theropod dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 71A.
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). PhD thesis. University of Bristol. 440 pp.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Rauhut and Carrano, in prep..

unnamed elaphrosaur (He, 1984)
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Xiashaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China

Material- (CCG 20011; paratype of Chuandongocoelurus primitivus) (~4.3-4.9 meters; ~70-100 kg; subadult) third cervical vertebra (61 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (69 mm), third dorsal centrum (65 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (58 mm), incomplete proximal caudal vertebra (60 mm), four distal caudal vertebrae, partial distal caudal vertebra, partial scapula (282 mm)
Diagnosis- lateral depression of third cervical centrum extends over 60% of central length; scapula less than 5.5 times longer than wide.
Description- He (1984) based Chuandongocoelurus on two specimens, one much larger than the other. While both include dorsal and caudal vertebrae, only those of the paratype were illustrated. Thus whether the paratype belongs to Chuandongocoelurus is unknown. The paratype can be estimated to be ~4.3-4.9 meters long, based on comparing presacral lengths with Elaphrosaurus. The resulting weight estimate is ~70-100 kilograms. The unfused neurocentral sutures in the dorsal vertebrae show this was a subadult, so this was not its maximum size.
Of the two cervical vertebrae preserved in the paratype, one is clearly from a very anterior position due to its slender centrum (ventral length 2.9 times posterior height). Glut (1997) refers to an axis, but the strong parapophyses suggest it was a third cervical instead, as basal theropods have very reduced axial parapophyses. The centrum is platycoelous or amphiplatyan, with an anterior face 38% wider than tall. There is a deep lateral fossa extending from near the posterior border of the centrum to beneath the diapophyses, though whether this contained foramina is uncertain. The diapophyses extend ventrolaterally to almost contact the parapophyses, thus the ribs were not fused to the vertebra. A dorsal fossa on the diapophyses as is present in basal ceratosaurs seems to be present. A posterodorsally projecting posterior infradiapophyseal lamina is present, and there may be a low angled bump on the posterior neural arch edge. The latter may also be due to breakage though. The prezygopophyses are broken off, but thir bases show they were massive. The posyzygopophyses were more slender, and are broken so that epipophyseal morphology is unknown. The neural spine is not well preserved, but was low and rounded.
The other cervical is from the posterior portion of the series as seen by the postzygopophyses extending past the centrum and the craniocaudally short neural spine. Comparison with Elaphrosaurus suggests it is the tenth. The centrum is again elongate (2.6 times posterior height), with a slight lateral depression. The anterior face is perhaps slightly convex and 38% wider than tall, while the posterior face is flat or concave. The parapophyses are massive and positioned on the anteroventral corners. There is a circular neural canal, a bit less than 40% as tall as the central face. The prezygopophyses are quite massive compared to Elaphrosaurus, though broken at their tips. The ventrolaterally projecting diapophyses end much further from the parapophyses than in the third cervical. The cervical ribs were apparently unfused to the vertebrae. The neural spine is low and short craniocaudally, although only its base remains. There is a large postzygopophyseal-central choana again, but no step this time. There is no evidence of epipophyses.
A centrum is probably from the third dorsal, as the parapophyses are partially on the centrum and partially on the neural arch, as seen in the third dorsals of Elaphrosaurus and Dilophosaurus. There is a slight lateral depression, the anterior face is 14% wider than tall and it looks slightly opisthocoelous.
The other dorsal has a parapophysis placed on the neural arch, but not at the dorsal edge of the prezygopophysis. This is seen in the fourth dorsal of Elaphrosaurus. The centrum is again rather elongate, with a small lateral depression and indeterminate face convexity. The ventral edge is more strongly concave than Elaphrosaurus. The diapophyses project laterally and appear backswept. The prezygopophyses are very short, but still more massive than Elaphrosaurus. A large postzygopophyseal-central choana is still present, with a step like the third cervical. There are large postzygopophyses and a moderate sized rectangular neural spine, with ventral margins sloping towards the zygopophyses, especially the postzygopophyses.
The caudal vertebra is probably from around the fifth position, judging by elongation. The centrum has no lateral depression and a moderately concave ventral surface. The anterior face is perhaps concave while the posterior is slightly convex. There are prominent transverse processes and the bases of large prezygopophyses. The neural spine is craniocaudally expansive and there looks to be a small anterior spine medial to the prezygopophyses. Postzygopophyses are broken off.
The scapula is very broad for a theropod (~5.1 times longer than broad), which is more than even abelisaurs and megalosaurs (~5.9 times). However, it lacks the expanded distal end of coelophysoids, Dilophosaurus and basal non-theropod dinosaurs and is thus still strap-like. Most of the anterior edge is lacking, but it is generally similar to Carnotaurus, differing in the slightly concave posterior margin. An extensive posteriorly facing glenoid is present.
Relationships- Norman (1990) referred Chuandongocoelurus to Theropoda indet., while noting the primitively broad scapula. As noted above, although broad, the scapula is still strap-like. Additionally, it is much broader than any other theropod or basal dinosaur and is thus an autapomorphy of the genus. In 2001, I noted the resemblence between the Chuandongocoelurus material and Elaphrosaurus, though I was unaware of the fact it belonged to two individuals. My saurischian supermatrix suggests the paratype is indeed sister to Elaphrosaurus, though the holotype seems to be a basal tetanurine.
Compared to Ceratosaurus and Carnotaurus, Elaphrosaurus and CCG 20011 share the following synapomorphies- elongate anterior dorsal centra (posterior central face height <65% of central length); anterior cervicals with low rounded neural spines; proximal caudal neural spines elongate anteroposteriorly, extending over ~2/3 of central length.
Coelophysids developed elongate anterior dorsal centra and very low rounded cervical neural spines in parallel, as they are absent in Herrerasaurus, Dilophosaurus and basal tetanurines. Herrerasaurids also developed long proximal caudal neural spines. The last two characters are also developed in tetanurines. Masiakasaurus has low rounded anterior cervical neural spines and elongate anterior dorsal centra.
CCG 20011 differs from Elaphrosaurus in several ways- large postzygopophyseal-central choana in presacral vertebrae; step in postzygopophyseal-central choana of anterior cervicals and anterior dorsals; lateral depression of third cervical extends over 60% of central length; posteroventral border of anterior cervical centra not convex; larger prezygopophyses on posterior cervicals to proximal caudals; small anterodorsally projecting process anterior to proximal caudal neural spines.
Many of these are plesiomorphic or found in other theropods, but several are unique to the specimen and are listed above in the diagnosis.
References- He, 1984. The vertebrate fossils of Sichuan. Sichuan Scientific and Technological Publishing House. 168 pp.
Norman, 1990. Problematic Theropoda: "Coelurosaurs". in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press. 280-305.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press. 1076 pp.
Mortimer, DML 2001. http://dml.cmnh.org/2001Jun/msg00957.html

Limusaurus Xu, Clark, Mo, Choiniere, Forster, Erickson, Hone, Sullivan, Eberth, Nesbitt, Zhao, Hernandez, Jia, Han and Guo, 2009
L. inextricabilis Xu, Clark, Mo, Choiniere, Forster, Erickson, Hone, Sullivan, Eberth, Nesbitt, Zhao, Hernandez, Jia, Han and Guo, 2009
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Shishugou Formation, Xinjiang, China
Holotype
- (IVPP V15923) (~1.7 m; <5 year old subadult) skull, sclerotic ring, mandible (105 mm), hyoid, seven cervical vertebrae (seventh cervical vertebra 45 mm), cervical ribs, fourth dorsal vertebra (26 mm), dorsal ribs, two sacral vertebrae, eleven caudal vertebrae (second 27 mm, twelfth 26 mm), eleven chevrons, scapulocoracoid (scapula ~95 mm), furcula, sternum, humeri (80 mm), radii (40 mm), ulnae, metacarpal II (12 mm), phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, proximal manual ungual II, metacarpal III (13 mm), phalanx III-2, manual ungual III, metacarpal IV, ilia (140 mm), distal pubis, ischium (133 mm), femur (208 mm), tibiae (249 mm), astragalocalcaneum, distal tarsals, metatarsals I, phalanges I-1, pedal unguals I, metatarsals II, phalanges II-1, phalanges II-2, pedal unguals II, metatarsals III (155 mm), phalanges III-1 (36 mm), phalanges III-2 (26 mm), phalanges III-3 (20 mm), pedal unguals III (21 mm), metatarsals IV, phalanges IV-1, phalanges IV-2, phalanges IV-3, phalanges IV-4, pedal unguals IV, metatarsal V, gastroliths
Paratypes- (IVPP V15924) (~2 m; 5 year old subadult) postcranial skeleton including metacarpal I, metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, manual ungual II, metacarpal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, manual ungual III, distal metacarpal IV, tibiotarsus (286 mm), fibula
(IVPP V16134) (~1.7 m) specimen including radius, ulna, metacarpal I, metacarpal II, metacarpal III
Referred- (IVPP coll.) caudal vertebrae, chevrons (Clark et al., 2002)
(IVPP coll.) caudal vertebrae, chevrons, hindlimbs (Clark et al., 2002)
(IVPP coll.) four specimens (Xu and Clark, 2006)
(IVPP coll.) six specimens (Clark pers. comm., 2009)
Diagnosis- (after Xu et al., 2009) skull half as long as the femur; premaxilla toothless; premaxilla with a convex ventral edge; maxilla toothless; nasal with a lateral shelf dorsal to antorbital fossa; short and wide nasal less than one-third of skull roof length and only twice as long as wide; ventral process of lacrimal strongly inclined anteriorly; slender jugal with rod-like suborbital and subtemporal rami; dentary toothless; large external mandibular fenestra about 40% of mandibular length; flange on anterior margin of scapular blade; radius tightly adhering to ulna; radius longer than ulna; olecranon process absent; metacarpal I highly reduced and carrying no phalanges; phalanx II-1 with distinct lateral process proximodorsally; metacarpal II much more robust than other metacarpals; metacarpal III with sub-triangular proximal articular surface; metacarpal III with non-ginglymoidal distal end; pubis with laterally ridged, prominent posterior boot; pedal digit I small, only 17% as long as metatarsal III; metatarsus forming a strong transverse arch; robust ventral process at medial margin of proximal end of metatarsal III; metatarsal IV nearly straight, appressed against lateral surface of metatarsal III for nearly its whole length.
Comments- This taxon was first presented as a possible ornithomimosaur by Clark et al. (2002), known from four specimens at the time. While IVPP V16134 was not mentioned in the referred material or main paper, is is in the supplementary information. Xu and Clark (2006) mentioned two new Shishugou ceratosaur taxa represented by four specimens, but all specimens are now thought to be referrable to Limusaurus (Clark pers. comm., 2009).
Limusaurus was found by Xu et al. (2009) to be the sister taxon of Elaphrosaurus within Ceratosauria, though it also shares some characters with neoceratosaurs, abelisauroids, noasaurids and tetanurines. Stiegler et al. (2014) later recovered it as a noasaurid.
Is metacarpal I is tetanurines actually metacarpal II? Xu et al. (2009) hypothesized Limusaurus may indicate metacarpals I-II-III-IV of tetanurines are homologous to metacarpals II-III-IV-V in other amniotes, based on several characters. Digit I in Limusaurus and Aucasaurus are highly reduced, with no phalanges. Yet Ceratosaurus shows an articular surface for phalanx I-1, showing the condition in Limusaurus may be derived within ceratosaurs as opposed to a basal ceratosauroid (ceratosaur+tetanurine) state. Metacarpal II is medially twisted in Limusaurus, Dilophosaurus and some Coelophysis bauri specimens, similar to metacarpal I in other saurischians. Unfortunately, this is not easily determinable from most figures, so the condition in basal tetanurines is unknown. While Xu et al. note metacarpal III lies ventral to metacarpal II in tetanurines, as metacarpal IV does to III in Limusaurus and coelophysoids, this is also true of metacarpal IV in tetanurines (e.g. Guanlong, as seen in its supplementary information; Tanycolagreus). Similarly, while metacarpal I does not overlap II in non-tetanurines, this is seemingly also true in Xuanhanosaurus and Acrocanthosaurus (overlap is present in Yangchuanosaurus, Megaraptor, Torvosaurus, Allosaurus and Guanlong however). There is a dorsolateral flange on metacarpal II of Dilophosaurus and Limusaurus which is similar to one on metacarpal I of some tetanurines (e.g. Yangchuanosaurus, Allosaurus, Guanlong). But Xuanhanosaurus and Megaraptor also have such a flange on metacarpal II, but not I, like basal theropods. Both flanges seem to exist in Acrocanthosaurus, while none exist in Aucasaurus and Torvosaurus. Xu et al. state metacarpal II is more robust than I in non-tetanurine theropods, homologizing it to the robust metacarpal I in tetanurines, but the situation is more complex. It's clearly the size of the base which is important, since even Coelophysis and Dilophosaurus have metacarpal I shafts more robust than those of II. Yet basal tetanurines (e.g. Xuanhanasaurus, Yangchuanosaurus, Torvosaurus, Megaraptor, Acrocanthosaurus, Allosaurus) have metacarpal II more robust than I, while Aucasaurus and Herrerasaurus have the opposite condition. This is true in Xu et al.'s tetanurine example of Guanlong too, while even their example of Deinonychus has more proximal area and depth on metacarpal II, just less width. Phalanx I-1 in tetanurines is said to be longer than phalanx I-1 in Herrerasaurus, Dilophosaurus and ceratosaurs, but phalanx I-1 is not preserved in any ceratosaur except for two questionably identified elements in Masiakasaurus. Furthermore, it is not as if any phalanx on digit II in Dilophosaurus or Herrerasaurus is notably more elongate than their phalanx I-1, and some basal tetanurines like Torvosaurus actually have an extremely short phalanx I-1. Metacarpal II is longest in tetanurines, while III is longest in more basal theropods. Yet Limusaurus and Ceratosaurus resemble tetanurines in this (contra Xu et al.'s statements and measurements about the former), and Dilophosaurus and Coelophysis rhodesiensis are polymorphic (e.g. II longer in the paratype of Dilophosaurus, III longer in the holotype). There is a proximal dorsolateral process on metacarpal III in coelophysoids and Limusaurus, similar to one on metacarpal II in some basal tetanurines like Guanlong. Yet Guanlong also has a process on metacarpal III, which partly covers metacarpal IV, even though the latter is not illustrated in Xu et al.'s paper. Acrocanthosaurus and Allosaurus also have a processes on metacarpal III, while Yangchuanosaurus lacks processes on metacarpals II or III. This process on metacarpal III of tetanurines could be homologous to the process on III in basal theropods as easily as it could the process on II. Finally, Xu et al. state metacarpal III in tetanurines is short, slender and proximally triangular like metacarpal IV in basal theropods. Of course, metacarpal IV in tetanurines is also short and slender (moreso than III), with those of Xuanhanosaurus and Yangchuanosaurus resembling metacarpal IV in basal theropods more than their metacarpal III. This is a case where the more reduced metacarpal III in derived tetanurines like Guanlong and Deinonychus (illustrated by Xu et al.) resembles basal theropod metacarpal IV more than metacarpal III in basal tetanurines (e.g. Xuanhanosaurus, Yangchuanosaurus, Torvosaurus, carnosaurs) do, with the thicker shaft and robust distal articulation in the latter taxa. As for their triangular proximal outline, metacarpal IV in Dilophosaurus and Limusaurus are more round than triangular, but Yangchuanosaurus shows basal tetanurines have triangular metacarpal IV too in any case. Xu et al. ran a phylogenetic analysis which determined that when characters states are ordered, the resulting tree assuming tetanurines have digits II-III-IV-V is six steps longer than if they are assumed to have digits I-II-III-IV. The length of the unordered trees is equal, but leaving characters unordered potentially leads to ridiculous "intermediate synapomorphies" like coelophysoids and Herrerasaurus being diagnosed by having a single phalanx on digit IV (not more or less) or taxon being diagnosed by having an intermediate ratio, as opposed to relatives with low and high ratios. Furthermore, neither Xuanhanosaurus, Yangchuanosaurus dongi or Megaraptor were included in their matrix, though these taxa show high homoplasy if II-III-IV-V is assumed, as noted above. I conclude that there is little evidence tetanurine hands lacked digit I.
References- Clark, Xu, Forster, Wang and Andres, 2002. New small dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation at Wucaiwan, Xinjiang, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 44A.
Xu and Clark, 2006. New ceratosaurs from the Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Western China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 142A.
Xu and Clark, 2008. Homologies in the hand of theropods. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3), 163A.
Xu, Clark, Mo, Choiniere, Forster, Erickson, Hone, Sullivan, Eberth, Nesbitt, Zhao, Hernandez, Jia, Han and Guo, 2009. A Jurassic ceratosaur from China helps clarify avian digital homologies. Nature. 459, 940-944.
Stiegler, Wang, Xu and Clark, 2013. Coding individual specimens as taxa: Test cases aid in resolving the relationships of basal Neotheropoda, gauge topological sensitivity to taxon sampling, and produce novel taxonomic hypotheses. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2013, 219-220.
Stiegler, Wang, Xu and Clark, 2014. New anatomical details of the basal ceratosaur Limusaurus and implications for the Jurassic radiation of Theropoda. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2014, 235.

Abelisauridae sensu Rowe et al., 1997
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Elaphrosaurus bambergi) (modified)

Neoceratosauria Novas, 1991
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis + Carnotaurus sastrei) (Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015; modified from Holtz, 1994)
Other definitions- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis <- Coelophysis bauri) (modified from Padian et al., 1999)
= "Neoceratosauria" Novas, 1989
= Ceratosauroidea Marsh, 1884 vide Bonaparte, Novas and Coria, 1990
Comments- This clade was first proposed by Novas (1989) in his thesis, and later published by him in 1991. It included ceratosaurids, noasaurids and abelisaurids in both, distinguishing them from coelophysoid ceratosaurs. It has been used since in a similar manner, though lately it also serves to separate the former taxa from basal ceratosaurs such as Elaphrosaurus. Bonaparte et al. (1990) named Ceratosauroidea for the same clade, though distinguished from allosauroid carnosaurs this time. Ceratosauroidea has been used much less often and has only been given definitions congruent with ceratosaurian coelophysoids, so Neoceratosauria is preferred here.
A supposed neoceratosaur distal femur from the Sinpetru Beds of Romania described by Csiki and Grigorescu (1998) is a probably hadrosaurid distal metatarsal based on a matching complete specimen (MAFI Ob.3120a) (Kessler et al., 2005).
References- Novas, 1989. Los dinosaurios carnivoros de la Argentina. PhD thesis. Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 510 pp.
Novas, 1991. Phylogenetic relationships of ceratosaurian theropod dinosaurs. Ameghiniana. 28, 401.
Csiki and Grigorescu, 1998. Small theropods from the Late Cretaceous of the Hateg Basin (Western Romania) - an unexpected diversity at the top of the food chain. Oryctos. 1, 87-104.
Kessler, Grigorescu and Csiki, 2005. Elopteryx revisited - a new bird-like specimen from the Maastrichtian of the Hateg Basin. Acta Palaeontologica Romaniae. 5, 249-258.
Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015. An overview of non-avian theropod discoveries and classification. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology. 12(1), 1-73.

unnamed possible neoceratosaur (Young, 1958)
Early Cretaceous
Tsanmakou, Shanxi, China

Material- (IVPP V969) caudal vertebra, distal scapula, distal ischia, proximal tibia, proximal fibula, metatarsal II (~300 mm), pedal phalanx III-1? (95 mm)
Comments- This was referred to Allosauridae indet. by Young (1958). Carrano et al. (2012) noted the oblique proximal margin to the proximomedial fibular fossa is unlike carnosaurs, and that the fossa's depth is unlike megalosauroids. They referred it to Neotheropoda (their Averostra) indet., but noted the large m. iliofibularis tubercle was like neoceratosaurs.
Reference- Young, 1958. The first record of dinosaurian remains from Shansi. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 2(4), 231-236.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed probable neoceratosaur (Maganuco et al., 2005)
Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Isalo Formation IIIb, Madagascar

Material- (MSNM V5778) anterior tooth (25.2 mm)
(MSNM V5779) lateral tooth (24.4 mm)
(MSNM V5780) lateral tooth (10.2 mm)
(MSNM V5781) lateral tooth (9.1 mm)
(MSNM V5782) lateral tooth (14.9 mm)
(MSNM V5783) lateral tooth (12.3 mm)
(MSNM V5784) lateral tooth (14.1 mm)
(MSNM V5788) lateral tooth (11.2 mm)
(MSNM V5790) lateral tooth (8.5 mm)
(MSNM V5794) lateral tooth (10.2 mm)
(MSNM V5798) lateral tooth (10.4 mm)
(MSNM V5799) lateral tooth (11.8 mm)
(MSNM V5806) lateral tooth (>9.7 mm)
(MSNM V5807) anterior tooth (28 mm)
(MSNM V5809) lateral tooth (>17.3 mm)
(MSNM V5810) lateral tooth (21.6 mm)
(MSNM V5814) lateral tooth (16.1 mm)
(MSNM V5817) lateral tooth (13.7 mm)
(MSNM V5818) lateral tooth (>14.6 mm)
(MSNM V5820) anterior tooth (16.4 mm)
(MSNM V5821) lateral tooth (9.7 mm)
(MSNM V5957) lateral tooth (>14 mm)
(MSNM V5962) lateral tooth (>19.1 mm)
Comments- These teeth resemble ceratosaurids in being extremely labiolingually compressed, and having the mesial carina vary in basal extent. The premaxillary teeth lack lingual fluting, unlike ceratosaurids. They are similar to abelisaurids' in having well developed basally angled blood grooves, short crowns, a fairly high DSDI (mean of 1.24). In addition to possessing the ceratosaurid similarities noted above, they differ from abelisaurids in having more serrations and lacking a drop-shaped cross section.
Reference- Maganuco, Cau, and Pasini, 2005. First description of theropod remains from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Madagascar. Atti della Società Italiana di Scienze Naturali e del Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano. 146(2), 165-202.

undescribed neoceratosaur (Company, Torices, Pereda-Suberbiola and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2009)
Late Campanian-Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Sierra Perenchiza Formation, Valencia, Spain
Material
- teeth (to 50 mm)
Comments- Described as moderately labiolingually compressed and distally recurved; both mesial and distal serrations; mesial carina laterally displaced; serrations chisel-shaped, wider labiolingually than mesiodistally; mesial serrations slightly smaller than distal ones (~3 denticles per mm); enamel slightly stretch-marked.
Reference- Company, Torices, Pereda-Suberbiola and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2009. Theropod teeth from the Late Cretaceous of Chera (Valencia, Eastern Spain). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 81A.

Ceratosauridae Marsh, 1884
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis <- Abelisaurus comahuensis) (modified from Rauhut, 2004)
Other definitions- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis <- Noasaurus leali, Carnotaurus sastrei) (Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015)
= Neoceratosauroidea Marsh, 1884 sensu Madsen and Welles, 2000
= Ceratosauridae sensu Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis <- Noasaurus leali, Carnotaurus sastrei)
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2000) extremely labiolingually compressed maxillary teeth; longest maxillary tooth exceeds minimum dentary height.
(after Chure, 2000) lingually fluted premaxillary teeth
Comments- Marsh (1884) named this family to include only Ceratosaurus, and it has been used infrequently since to include taxa like Proceratosaurus, Sarcosaurus and Genyodectes.
Madsen and Welles (2000) listed Neoceratosauroidea "including only the family Ceratosauridae", but this in invalid as there is no genus Neoceratosaurus.
References- Marsh, 1884. Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part VIII. The order Theropoda. The American Journal of Science. 27, 329-340.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Rauhut, 2004. Provenance and anatomy of Genyodectes serus, a large-toothed ceratosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(4), 894-902.
Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015. An overview of non-avian theropod discoveries and classification. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology. 12(1), 1-73.

Ceratosaurus? roechlingi Janensch, 1925
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Lectotype- (MB R 2162; = MW 4) partial mid caudal centrum
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2011) Provisionally indeterminate relative to Ceratosaurus nasicornis.
Comments- Janensch (1925) based this species on a partial quadrate (MB R 2160), three partial caudal vertebrae (MB R 1934, 1935, 2162) and a proximal fibula (MB R 3627), thought to belong to a single individual, as well as two caudals from earlier sediments (MB R 1938, 2166). Additionally, he labeled an astragalus and calcaneum (MB R 1926) as belonging to this taxon in the museum collections, though the specimen is not mentioned in the literature until Carrano and Sampson (2008). Madsen and Welles (2000) attempted to make the distal quadrate MB R 2160 the holotype of Ceratosaurus roechlingi, but as pointed out by Rauhut (2011) this is not valid as they only used the word 'type' (ICZN 74.7.1). Rauhut instead made the partial caudal MB R 2162 the lectotype because it shows ceratosaurian characters unlike the other material. He also found that while the other two associated vertebrae are of the right size to belong to the lectotype (though they are only referrable to Neotheropoda indet.), the quadrate (also Neotheropoda indet.) and hindlimb elements (Megalosauroidea indet.) are from a larger individual. The earlier caudals were made the type of his new carcharodontosaurid Veterupristisaurus, described as "a very large probable allosauroid" in his 2006 abstract. Rauhut found roechlingi to be indeterminate, but a ceratosaur based on the central cavity and possibly ceratosaurid based on the wide and deep ventral median groove (the latter also present in some basal tetanurines).
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Madsen and Welles, 2000. Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) a revised osteology. Miscellaneous Publication 00-2 Utah Geological Survey. 80 pp.
Rauhut, 2006. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tanzania and the origin of Cretaceous Gondwanan theropod faunas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 113A.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.

Genyodectes Woodward, 1901
G. serus Woodward, 1901
Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Cerro Castano Member(?) of Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Holotype- (MLP 26-39) premaxillae, anteroventral maxillae, anterior dentaries, partial supradentaries, splenial fragment, teeth
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2004) ceratosaurid synapomorphies (extremely labiolingually compressed maxillary teeth; longest maxillary tooth exceeds minimum dentary height) combined with plesiomorphic presence of four premaxillary teeth.
References- Woodward, 1901. On some extinct reptiles from Patagonia, of the genera Miolania, Dinilysia, and Genyodectes. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 1901, 169-184.
Huene, 1929. Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196.
Rauhut, 2004. Provenance and anatomy of Genyodectes serus, a large-toothed ceratosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(4), 894-902.

Ostafrikasaurus
Buffetaut, 2011
O. crassiserratus Buffetaut, 2011
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Holotype- (MB R 1084; type a of Janensch; paralectotype of Labrosaurus stechowi) premaxillary tooth (46 mm)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Referred- (MB R 1091; type d of Janensch; paralectotype of Labrosaurus stechowi) premaxillary tooth
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2011) differs from stechowi in having more lingual ridges (11 vs. 2-3); lingual ridges well developed apically; labial ridges present.
Comments- Though referred to Labrosaurus stechowi by Janensch (1925; as type a), Rauhut (2011) noted differences that suggest it may be a different taxon. Another possibility is positional variation. Buffetaut (2008) suggested this (and possibly MR B 1091) could be a basal spinosaurid, and all Ostafrikasaurus teeth were proposed by Fowler (2007) as being potential links between ceratosaurs and baryonychines. Rauhut found the shape, cross section and serration morphology was the same as stechowi, that it lacks spinosaurid-style granulated enamel and that unlike baryonychines the distal crown is least ridged. Buffetaut (2011) later described it as a new species of spinosaurid- Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus. It is retained in Ceratosauridae here pending further comparison.
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Fowler, 2007. Recently rediscovered baryonychine teeth (Dinosauria Theropoda): New morphologic data, range extension and similarity to ceratosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 76A.
Fowler, 2007 online. http://www.denverfowler.com/publications/Fowler_2007_SVP.htm
Buffetaut, 2008. Spinosaurid teeth from the Late Jurassic of Tengaduru, Tanzania, with remarks on the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the Spinosauridae. In Mazin, Pouch, Hantzpergue and Lacombe (eds.). Mid-Mesozoic life and environments. Documents des Laboratoires de Geologie Lyon, 164. 26-28.
Buffetaut, 2011. An early spinosaurid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania) and the evolution of the spinosaurid dentition. Oryctos. 10, 1-8.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.
O? stechowi (Janensch, 1920) new combination
= Labrosaurus stechowi Janensch, 1920
= Allosaurus stechowi (Janensch, 1920) Glut, 1997
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Lectotype- (MB R 1083; type b of Janensch) premaxillary tooth (45 mm)
Paralectotypes- (MB R 1086-1090, 1092) three premaxillary teeth, two lateral teeth (36-38 mm)
Referred- (MB R 1093) tooth (Rauhut, 2011)
Diagnosis- (after Chure, 2000) differs from Ceratosaurus in having mesial serrations on probable anterior premaxillary teeth; lower, less laterally compressed lateral teeth; lingual ridges on lateral teeth.
Comments- Janensch (1920) originally described this taxon based on ten syntype teeth and only illustrated MB R 1083. He later (1925) stated "The teeth that I already designated as type-teeth of the species (1920, p. 233, Fig. 7-8) comes from the Middle Saurian Bed in Mahimbwi Valley at Tendaguru", referencing the illustration of MB R 1083. Rauhut (2011) listed that tooth as the holotype, but this cannot be true as Janensch never chose a holotype in 1920 and one can not be subsequently designated. Janensch's 1925 statement is provisionally considered a lectotype designation for MB R 1083, based on ICZN Article 74.6.1.1- "The inference that the specimen is a "holotype" or "the type" may be by reference to an illustration or description of a specimen [Art. 74.4]."
Chure (2000) noted this resembles Ceratosaurus in the lingual fluting of premaxillary teeth, but also that it differs in some ways. As the species is diagnosable, it is not a "nomen vanum" (a term unused by the ICZN but synonymous with nomen dubium), contra Madsen and Welles (2000). While Madsen and Welles claimed stechowi is probably a junior synonym of roechlingi, this is impossible as the latter was named five years later. It is possible the species are synonymous though, as both seem to be ceratosaurid though they cannot be compared.
References- Janensch, 1920. Uber Elaphrosaurus bambergi und die Megalosaurier aus den Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafricas. Sitzungsberichte Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde Berlin. 8, 225-235.
Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press. 1076 pp.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Madsen and Welles, 2000. Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) a revised osteology. Miscellaneous Publication 00-2 Utah Geological Survey. 80 pp.
Rauhut, 2006. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tanzania and the origin of Cretaceous Gondwanan theropod faunas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 113A.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.

Ceratosaurus Marsh, 1884
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2000) narrow rounded horn core centrally placed on the fused nasals; median oval groove on nasals behind horn core; premaxilla with three teeth; premaxillary teeth with reduced extent of mesial serrations; chevrons extremely long; pubis with large, rounded notch underneath the obturator foramen; small epaxial osteoderms.
Ex-Ceratosaurus- Janensch (1920) tentatively referred three dorsals from the Tendaguru Formation (MB R 1936, 2163 and a lost one previously called TL 8) to Ceratosaurus, but Rauhut (2011) subsequently identified them as tetanurine. Similarly, Janensch stated a femur (MB R 3621) and two tibiae (MB R 3625, 3626) from that formation were very similar to Ceratosaurus, but Rauhut found these to be more similar to abelisaurids. For Ceratosaurus roechlingi (Janensch, 1925), see it's entry as a possible ceratosaurid with several misassigned or questionably assigned elements (Rauhut, 2011). White (1964) assigned a maxilla (DNM coll.) to Ceratosaurus, but Madsen and Welles (2000) reidentified it as Allosaurus. Paul (1988) referred Megalosaurus ingens to Ceratosaurus, but Rauhut (2011) showed that these teeth are more like derived carcharodontosaurids. Madsen and Welles refer Labrosaurus stechowi to Ceratosaurus sp., but these differ and are all identified as Ostafrikasaurus here (a genus proposed for some of the paratypes by Buffetaut, 2011). Meyer and Thuring (2003) reported a supposedly Ceratosaurus-like tooth from the Oxfordian Vellerat Formation of Switzerland, but Meyer later doubted this (Meyer pers. comm. 2006 to Soto and Perea, 2008).
References- Janensch, 1920. Uber Elaphrosaurus bambergi und die Megalosaurier aus den Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafricas. Sitzungsberichte Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde Berlin. 8, 225-235.
Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York. 464 pp.
Madsen and Welles, 2000. Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) a revised osteology. Miscellaneous Publication 00-2 Utah Geological Survey. 80 pp.
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). PhD thesis. University of Bristol. 440 pp.
Meyer and Thüring, 2003. Dinosaurs of Switzerland. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2, 103-117.
Soto and Perea, 2008. A ceratosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of Uruguay. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(2), 439-444.
Buffetaut, 2011. An early spinosaurid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania) and the evolution of the spinosaurid dentition. Oryctos. 10, 1-8.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.
C. nasicornis Marsh, 1884
= Megalosaurus nasicornis (Marsh, 1884) Cope, 1892
= Labrosaurus "sulcatus" Marsh, 1896
= Labrosaurus sulcatus Marsh, 1896 vide Hay, 1908
= Ceratosaurus "dentisulcatus" Anonymous, 1995
= Ceratosaurus "willisobrienorum" Welles, Powell and Pickering vide Pickering, 1995
= Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus Madsen and Welles, 2000
= Ceratosaurus magnicornis Madsen and Welles, 2000
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado, US
(Callison's Quarries, Dry Mesa Quarry, Marsh-Felch Quarry 1, Mygatt-Moore Quarry)
Holotype- (USNM 4735) (5.46 m, 524 kg, adult) skull (625 mm), mandibles (650 mm), three teeth, hyoids, atlantal centrum, atlantal neural arches, axial intercentrum, axis (88 mm), third cervical vertebra (60 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (60 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (64 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (68 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (68 mm), partial eighth cervical vertebra, partial ninth cervical neural spine, fragmentary cervical ribs, second dorsal vertebra (62 mm), third dorsal vertebra (~73 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (~83 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (~80 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (~93 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (88 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (81 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (80 mm), eleventh dorsal rib, first sacral vertebra (85 mm), second sacral vertebra (82 mm), fused third-seventh sacral vertebra (84, 73, 71, 72, 80 mm), first caudal vertebra (79 mm), second caudal vertebra (80 mm), third caudal vertebra (80 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (79 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (78 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (76 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (81 mm), eighth caudal vertebra (79 mm), ninth caudal vertebra (78 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (78 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (77 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (76 mm), thirteenth caudal vertebra (74 mm), fourteenth caudal vertebra, fifteenth caudal vertebra, sixteenth caudal vertebra, seventeenth caudal vertebra, eighteenth caudal vertebra (62 mm), nineteenth caudal vertebra (58 mm), twentieth caudal vertebra, twenty-first caudal vertebra, twenty-second caudal vertebra (59 mm), twenty-third caudal vertebra (62 mm), twenty-fourth caudal vertebra (58 mm), twenty-fifth caudal vertebra (58 mm), twenty-sixth caudal vertebra (56 mm), twenty-eighth caudal vertebra (55 mm), twenty-ninth caudal vertebra (51 mm), thirtieth caudal vertebra (48 mm), thirty-first caudal vertebra (49 mm), thirty-second caudal vertebra (48 mm), thirty-third caudal vertebra (50 mm), thirty-fourth caudal vertebra (47 mm), thirty-fifth caudal vertebra (47 mm), thirty-sixth caudal vertebra (43 mm), thirty-seventh caudal vertebra (41 mm), thirty-eighth caudal vertebra (40 mm), thirty-ninth caudal vertebra (39 mm), fourtieth caudal vertebra (39 mm), fourty-first caudal vertebra (36 mm), fourty-second caudal vertebra (35 mm), fourty-third caudal vertebra (30 mm), fourty-fourth caudal vertebra (29 mm), fourty-fifth caudal vertebra (32 mm), fourty-sixth caudal vertebra (28 mm), fourty-seventh caudal vertebra (26 mm), fourty-eighth caudal vertebra (24 mm), fourty-ninth caudal vertebra (20 mm), fifthieth caudal vertebra (18 mm), fifty-first caudal vertebra (18 mm), second to ninth chevron (3rd 258, 6th 221 mm), ~fifteenth chevron (132 mm), twenty-ninth to fortieth chevrons (30th 53, 31st 49, 33rd 43, 35th 34, 39th 24, 40th 23 mm), proximal scapulocoracoid, radius (149 mm), incomplete ulna (181 mm), metacarpals I (42 mm; one incomplete), metacarpals II (69 mm; one distal), phalanx II-1 (28 mm; distal half lost), metacarpal III (68 mm), phalanges III-1 (29, 32 mm), metacarpals IV (48, 48mm), phalanx IV-1 (18 mm), fused pelves (ilia, pubes and ischia incomplete; ilia ~620, pubes ~670, ischia ~505 mm), femora (620 mm), tibia (555 mm), fibula, astragalocalcaneum (130 mm wide), distal tarsal III, fused metatarsus (II 230, III 254, IV 220 mm), pedal ungual IV, several axial osteoderms, skin impression
Referred- (BYUVP 4838) caudal vertebra (80 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 4853) anterior caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 4908) caudal vertebra (95 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 4951) posterior dorsal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 4952) posterior dorsal vertebra (96 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 5092) caudal vertebra (94 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 5103) middle caudal vertebra (62 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 5254) caudal vertebra (84 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 8907) dorsal vertebra (88 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 8910) middle caudal vertebra, (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 8937) caudal vertebra (92 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 8938) caudal vertebra (76 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 8974) posterior caudal vertebra (91 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 8982) caudal vertebra (70 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9108) caudal vertebra (83 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9136) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9141) caudal vertebra (90 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9142) middle or posterior dorsal vertebra (83 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9143) middle or posterior dorsal vertebra (85 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9144) middle or posterior dorsal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9152) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9161) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9162) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 9163) posterior caudal vertebra (36 mm) (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 5010) metatarsal III (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 5008) metatarsal III (Britt, 1991)
(BYUVP 13024) scapulocoracoid (Madsen and Welles, 2000)
(BYUVP? coll.) teeth (Kirkland pers. comm. to Madsen and Welles, 2000)
(CM 21706) incomplete dentary (McIntosh, 1981)
(MWC 1; material of Ceratosaurus "willisobrienorum"; holotype of Ceratosaurus magnicornis) (subadult) (5.6 m) skull (~600 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (65 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (80 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (75 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (60 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (68 mm), tenth cervical vertebra, cervical rib, first dorsal vertebra (170 mm), second dorsal vertebra (75 mm), third dorsal vertebra (65 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (65 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (110 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (100 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (85 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (95 mm), posterior dorsal vertebra (98 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (70 mm), mid caudal vertebra, four distal caudal vertebrae, mid chevron, humerus (292 mm), manual ungual, incomplete femora (630 mm), tibiae (520 mm), astragalocalcaneum (127 mm wide), metatarsal II, metatarsal III (234 mm), phalanx II-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx IV-1, five dermal ossicles (Pickering, 1995; described by Madsen and Welles, 2000)
teeth (Madsen and Welles, 2000)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Oklahoma, US
(Stovall's Pit 1)
(OMNH 1491) tooth (OMNH online)
(OMNH 73096) caudal vertebra (OMNH online)
? several teeth (~51 mm), cervical vertebra (89 mm), two incomplete dorsal vertebrae (124 mm), several ribs (~300-500 mm), fused metatarsus fragment (Stovall, 1938)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Utah, US
(Carnegie Quarry, Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry, Sand Bench site)
(BYUVP 12893) (adult) (7.1 m) skull (~810 mm), seven fragmentary dorsal vertebrae, sacrum, ossified tendons, incomplete pelvic elements including pubis and ischium (Britt, Chure, Holtz, Miles and Stadtman, 2000)
(DNM 972) premaxilla (154 mm) (Madsen and Welles, 2000)
(UMNH 5278; = UMNH 6329; holotype of Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus) (6.7 m) premaxillae, maxilla, jugal, quadratojugal, quadrate, pterygoid, incomplete dentaries, incomplete angular, incomplete splenials, teeth (to 93x30x15 mm), atlantal intercentrum (28 mm), axis (89 mm), third cervical vertebra (65 mm), fourth cervical vertebra, fifth cervical vertebra (90 mm), incomplete sixth cervical vertebra (75 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (64 mm), eighth cervical vertebra, ninth cervical vertebra (66 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (50 mm), two incomplete cervical ribs, sixth dorsal vertebra (63 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (94 mm), incomplete tenth dorsal vertebra (99 mm), three incompete dorsal ribs, eight proximal caudal vertebrae (102 mm), three mid caudal vertebrae (90 mm), eleven distal caudal vertebrae (72 mm), two proximal chevrons (276 mm), three mid chevrons, six distal chevrons, scapulocoracoid (405 mm), humerus (333 mm), metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, metacarpal III, femur (759 mm), tibiae (594 mm), fibulae (564 mm), astragalocalcaneum (165 mm wide), distal tarsal IV, metatarsal IV, fifteen axial osteoderms (Madsen and Stokes, 1963; described by Madsen and Welles, 2000)
material (Turner and Peterson, 1999)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
(Nail Quarry, Reed’s Quarry 9)
(YPM 1936; holotype of Labrosaurus sulcatus) anterior dentary tooth (30x12.5x12 mm)
scapulocoracoid (Madsen and Welles, 2000)
Kimmeridigian, Late Jurassic
Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US

Material- (juvenile) (3.6 m) complete skull (413 mm), 30% complete skeleton including vertebrae and pelvis (Britt, Cloward, Miles and Madsen, 1999)
Late Jurassic?
Morrison Formation?, US?
Material
- ("YPM 4681") tibia (557 mm) (Carrano, 1996)
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 1883-1884. Initially described by Marsh (1884) and Hay (1908), it was extensively described by Gilmore (1920) and has had its forelimb recently redescribed by Carrano and Choiniere (2016). While initially described as natural, the fused metatarsus is now seen as pathological.
Labrosaurus sulcatus is based on a tooth (YPM 1936) discovered in 1878 from Reed's Quarry 9, and first published as a figure caption by Marsh (1896). As the caption doesn't qualify as as description, definition or indication (ICZN Article 12.1), the name as published by Marsh is a nomen nudum (Rauhut, 2011). Hay (1908) was thus the first author to officially name the species, as he provides a description. Hay questioned the rationale for Marsh's referring it to Labrosaurus, which is based on L. lucaris, not thought to preserve teeth at the time. Chure (2000) discovered that three uncatalogued teeth belong to the L. lucaris holotype, though these have never been described. Regardless, L. lucaris is an allosaurid so is not congeneric with sulcatus (see below). Olshevsky (1991) was the first author to synonymize it with Ceratosaurus nasicornis, though Glut (1997) states Madsen informed him of this in 1986. Current authors (e.g. Chure, 2000; Madsen and Welles, 2000) agree it cannot be distinguished from other Ceratosaurus. Note while Gilmore (1920) and Chure identified it as a premaxillary tooth, Madsen and Welles believe it is more probably from the anterior dentary.
A specimen was discovered in 1976 from Callison's Quarries (Fruita area, Colorado) and initially published as C. "willisobrienorum" by Pickering (1995). It was described by Madsen and Welles (2000) as C. magnicornis. The latter authors diagnosed it relative to C. nasicornis based on numerous characters- more massive; having a longer and lower skull (H:L ratio 40); anterior border of premaxilla straighter; maxilla longer (412 mm); maxillary anterior edge almost vertical; maxillary ventral edge more convex; promaxillary fenestra more deeply impressed; deeperpneumatic in maxillary ascending process; dorsal edge of posterior maxillary process angles 15 degrees; anterior edge of maxilla lower at front of fenestra; nasal horn core is longer and lower; teeth are longer and stouter, especially posteriorly; lacrimal is more massive; lacrimal bears high, rugose horn core; lacrimal horn has longer base; much larger lacrimal recess; quadratojugal more massive ventrally; quadrate has much larger, lower articular surface; quadrate body more concave posteriorly; dentary much more concave dorsally and convex ventrally; dentary chin much more rounded; dentary more massive; dentary 148 mm high at surangular contact at 546 mm from chin; 11-12 dentary teeth; sixth cervical 80 mm long; sixth cervical neural spine much higher (145 mm); sixth cervical neural spine longer anteroposteriorly (52 mm); sixth cervical neural spine table slants more steeply posteriorly; infrapostzygapopyhseal fossa much shorter; sixth cervical diapophysis much higher above parapophysis; stout epipophysis on sixth cervical vertebra; femur 630 mm; femoral head 120 mm broad; distal femur 135 mm broad; femoral shaft 75 mm broad below trochanteric shelf; femoral shaft straighter; tibia 520 mm long; cnemial crest less well developed; proximal tibia 135 mm in diameter; distal tibia 132 mm in diameter; astragalar ascending process completely fills tibial facet; calcaneum broader anteriorly, occupying 43% of astragalocalcanear breadth; astragalocalcanear suture runs dorsolaterally; calcaneum broader in lateral view. As Carrano and Sampson (2008) note, many of these are merely measurements which are taxonomically useless in differently sized individuals, while others are expected to vary ontogenetically, and others are proportional differences expected to vary individually. They synonymized the species, which is accepted here.
A Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry Ceratosaurus was first announced by Madsen and Stokes (1963). The new name was first mentioned in a sales pamphlet (Anonymous, 1995), and Madsen and Welles (2000) officially erected C. dentisulcatus for UMNH 5278. This specimen was found disarticulated during discontinuous excavations starting in 1927, and each element has its own UUVP number as well. Carrano and Choiniere (2016) reidentified the pedal phalanx listed by Madsen and Welles as manual phalanx II-1. The species distinction from C. nasicornis was based on numerous characters- ventral border of premaxilla arched and almost horizontal; dorsal premaxillary process lower; body of premaxilla longer; premaxilla with several large foramina; maxilla more massive; maxillary alveolar border more convex; maxillary fossa more pronounced; posterior edge of maxillary ascending process rises more steeply; front of antorbital fenestra wider; promaxillary fenestra and pneumatic fossa in ascending process present; 12 maxillary teeth; maxillary teeth more massive; maxillary teeth more strongly recurved; dentary more massive; dentary more upturned from tooth 6 forward; dentary teeth more massive; 11 dentary teeth; atlas-axis 100 mm long; odontoid more prominent; axial centrum much shorter; axial centrum ventral edge less downcurved; axial neural spine higher; axial neural spine very much shorter anteroposteriorly; dorsal edge of axial neural spine straighter; no axial prezygapophysis; axial epipophysis extending far behind neural spine; third cervical centrum shorter; third cervical centrum ends almost vertical; third cervical spine shorter; third cervical neural spine almost vertical; third cervical epipophysis much larger; tibia longer (594 mm); tibia more massive; cnemial crest heavier; astragalar buttress angles five degrees; distal tibia 165 mm broad; fibula longer (564 mm); proximal fibula vertical; proximal fibula broader; iliofibularis tubercle angles posteriorly; iliofibularis tubercle's proximal edge projects anteriorly; distal fibula broader (81 mm); distal fibula convex, evenly rounded; weak horizontal groove across astragalar body; astragalar ascending process ossified. Carrano and Sampson (2008) correctly dismiss these for the same reasons as in C. magnicornis, and their synonymization is similarly accepted on this site. Note Carrano and Choiniere (2016) accidentally listed UMNH 6329 as a separate metacarpal II than that in the type material, but there is only one metacarpal II present (Carrano, pers. comm. 2016).
Stovall (1938) describes several elements from Oklahoma as ?Ceratosaurus, but Madsen and Welles (2000) rejected this and viewed the material as Theropoda indet.. However, the illustrated tooth has the ceratosaurid character of high labiolingual compression (BW/FABL ratio 31%), the cervical is anteriorly flat unlike other large Morrison theropods (megalosaurids and allosaurids) and is similar to Ceratosaurus in shape, and the metatarsals are fused. Thus the material may be Ceratosaurus after all, but deserves further study. BYUVP 5103 was initially assigned by Britt (1991) to Stokesosaurus, but later to Ceratosaurus (Britt in Curtice and Wilhite, 1996). Carrano (1998) lists YPM 4681 as a Ceratosaurus nasicornis tibia in his table, but the YPM online catalog shows no results for this number and no Ceratosaurus material besides the sulcatus type tooth.
References- Dollo, 1884. Les métatarsiens du Ceratosaurus. Revue des questions scientifiques. 16, 646-648.
Marsh, 1884. Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part VIII. The order Theropoda. The American Journal of Science, series 3. 27, 329-340.
Marsh, 1884. On the united metatarsal bones of Ceratosaurus. The American Journal of Science, series 3. 28, 161-162.
Cope, 1892. On the skull of the dinosaurian Laelaps incrassatus (Cope). Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 30, 240-245.
Marsh, 1892. Restorations of Claosaurus and Ceratosaurus. The American Journal of Science, series 3. 44, 343-350.
Marsh, 1893. Restorations of Anchisaurus, Ceratosaurus, and Claosaurus. Geological Magazine, series 3. 10, 150-157.
Marsh, 1896. The dinosaurs of North America. U.S. Geological Survey, 16th Annual Report. 1894-95, 133-244.
Hay, 1908. On certain genera and species of carnivorous dinosaurs, with special reference to Ceratosaurus nasicornis Marsh. Proceedings of the United States National Museum. 35, 351-366.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bulletin of the United States National Museum. 110, 1-154.
Madsen and Stokes, 1963. New information on the Jurassic dinosaur Ceratosaurus. Geological Society of America. Special Paper 73, 90.
McIntosh, 1981. Annotated catalogue of the dinosaur (Reptilia, Archosauria) in the collections of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Bulletin of Carnegie Museum of Natural History. 18, 1-67.
Britt, 1991. Theropods of Dry Mesa Quarry (Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic), Colorado, with emphasis on the osteology of Torvosaurus tanneri. Brigham Young University Geology Studies. 37, 1-72.
Olshevsky, 1991. A revision of the parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, excluding the advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Anonymous, 1995. Price list of specimens available from Dinolab, Salt Lake City, Utah.
Pickering, 1995. Jurassic Park: Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, 2nd revised printing. Capitola, California. 478 pp.
Curtice and Wilhite, 1996. A re-evaluation of the Dry Mesa Dinosaur Quarry sauropod fauna with a description of juvenile sauropod elements. In Huffman, Lund and Godwin (eds.). Geology and Resources of the Paradox Basin. Utah Geological Association Guidebook. 25, 325-338.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press. 1076 pp.
Carrano, 1998. The evolution of dinosaur locomotion: Functional morphology, biomechanics, and modern analogs. PhD Thesis, The University of Chicago. 424 pp.
Britt, Cloward, Miles and Madsen, 1999. A juvenile Ceratosaurus (Theropoda, Dinosauria) from Bone Cabin Quarry West (Upper Jurassic, Morrison Formation), Wyoming. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(3), 33A.
Turner and Peterson, 1999. Biostratigraphy of dinosaurs in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the Western Interior, U.S.A.. In Gillette (ed.). Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication. 99-1, 77-114.
Welles and Pickering, 1999. An Extract From: Archosauromorpha: Cladistics and Osteologies. 70 pp.
Britt, Chure, Holtz, Miles and Stadtman, 2000. A reanalysis of the phylogenetic affinities of Ceratosaurus (Theropoda, Dinosauria) based on new specimens from Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(3), 32A.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Madsen and Welles, 2000. Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) a revised osteology. Miscellaneous Publication 00-2 Utah Geological Survey. 80 pp.
Sanders and Smith, 2005. The endocranium of the theropod dinosaur Ceratosaurus studied with computed tomography. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 50(3), 601-616.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.
Carrano and Choiniere, 2015. New information on theropod forelimb evolution from the forearm and manus of Ceratosaurus nasicornis (Dinosauria, Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2015, 103.
Carrano and Choiniere, 2016. New information on the forearm and manus of Ceratosaurus nasicornis Marsh, 1884 (Dinosauria, Theropoda), with implications for theropod forelimb evolution. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1054497. DOI:10.1080/02724634.2015.1054497
C. meriani (Greppin, 1870) new comb.
= Megalosaurus meriani Greppin, 1870
= Labrosaurus meriani (Greppin, 1870) Janensch, 1920
= Antrodemus meriani (Greppin, 1870) Steel, 1970
= Allosaurus meriani (Greppin, 1870) Olshevsky, 1978
Early Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Reuchenette Formation, Switzerland

Holotype- (MH 350) premaxillary tooth (60x18x? mm)
Diagnosis- Provisionally indeterminate relative to Ceratosaurus nasicornis.
Comments- Meyer and Thuring (2003) note this is probably not from the Virgulla Beds as reported by Janensch and others.
Originally Megalosaurus meriani was described as including more teeth, two caudals (MH 276, 280), a femur (MH 372) and an ?osteoderm, though the postcrania were later removed as the holotype of Ornithopsis greppini once Janensch realized it was sauropod in 1920/1921 (Huene, 1922).
Olshevsky (1978) refers this to Ceratosaurus based on resemblance to "Labrosaurus" sulcatus. The tooth is nearly identical to the first premaxillary tooth of Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus' holotype, and differs from most other theropods in having lingual ridges. It differs from Genyodectes and Ostafrikosaurus in lacking mesial serrations. As it is of identical size and found in temporally equivalent beds, I believe it should be called Ceratosaurus meriani, though the species is indeterminate within the genus Ceratosaurus.
References- Greppin, 1870. Description geologique du Jura bernois et de quelques districts adjacents. Beiträge zur geologischen Karte der Schweiz. 8, 1-357.
Janensch, 1920. Uber Elaphrosaurus bambergi und die Megalosaurier aus den Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafricas. Sitzungsberichte Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde Berlin. 8, 225-235.
Huene, 1922. Ueber einen Sauropoden im obern Malm des Berner Jura. Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae. 17, 80-94.
Steel, 1970. Part 14. Saurischia. Handbuch der Paläoherpetologie/Encyclopedia of Paleoherpetology. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart. 1-87.
Olshevsky, 1978. The archosaurian taxa (excluding the Crocodylia). Mesozoic Meanderings. 1, 1-50.
Meyer and Thüring, 2003. Dinosaurs of Switzerland. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2, 103-117.
C. sp. (Mateus and Antunes, 2000)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Praia da Amoreira Member of Alcobaca Formation, Portugal

(IPFUB Gui D 191) tooth (Rauhut, 2000)
(IPFUB Gui D coll.) several teeth (Rauhut, 2000)
(ML 342) tooth (Mateus et al., 2006)
(ML 352) femur (647 mm), tibia (570 mm) (Mateus and Antunes, 2000)
....(SHN(JJS)-65) femur (650 mm), tibia (570 mm), partial fibula (Malafaia et al., 2014)
(ML 737) tooth (Mateus et al., 2006)
(ML 809) tooth (Mateus et al., 2006)
Comments- Mateus and Antunes (2000) initially reported a femur and tibia as cf. Ceratosaurus sp., while Rauhut (2000) referred several teeth to Ceratosaurus. Antunes and Mateus (2003) illustrated the hindlimb elements as Ceratosaurus sp.. Mateus et al. (2006) reported additional teeth and ascribed the Portuguese material to C. dentisulcatus based on the "relative position of the [tibial] epiphysial expansions" and "posterior intercondylar bridge of the femur", but Carrano and Sampson (2008) state "the supposed similarities are with distorted features of the right tibia of C. dentisulcatus; the left tibia of the same individual is identical to those of other Ceratosaurus 'species'." Malafaia et al. (2014) later described additional hindlimb elements from the same individual as ML 352, this time as "Ceratosaurus aff. Ceratosaurus nasicornis, the only valid species recognised for the genus." While it is probable the European material is taxonomically distinct from C. nasicornis, this has yet to be demonstrated morphologically, so they are retained as C. sp. here.
References- Mateus and Antunes, 2000. Late Jurassic dinosaurs of Portugal. Abstracts of the First Symposium of European Dinosaurs. [pp?]
Rauhut, 2000. The dinosaur fauna from the Guimarota mine. In Martin and Krebs (eds.). Guimarota - A Jurassic Ecosystem. Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil. 75-82.
Antunes and Mateus, 2003. Dinosaurs of Portugal. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2(1), 77-95.
Mateus, Walen and Antunes, 2006. The large theropod fauna of the Lourinha Formation (Portugal) and its similarity to the Morrison Formation, with a description of a new species of Allosaurus. In Foster and Lucas (eds.). Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 36, 1-7.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Malafaia, Ortega, Escaso and Silva, 2015. New evidence of Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin, Portugal. Historical Biology. 27(7), 938-946.
C? sp. (Soto and Perea, 2008)
Kimmeridgian-Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Lower member of Tacuarembo Formation, Uruguay
Material
- (FC-DPV 1950) premaxillary tooth (15.2 x 6.5 x 5.3 mm)
(FC-DPV 2150) posterior premaxillary tooth (10 x 5.9 x 4.1 mm)
(FC-DPV coll.) lateral teeth
Comments- These teeth have serrationless mesial carinae, and are contemporaneus with Ceratosaurus, so are tentatively referred to that genus here.
Reference- Soto and Perea, 2008. A ceratosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of Uruguay. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(2), 439-444.

Abelisauroidea Bonaparte and Novas, 1985 sensu Bonaparte, 1991
Definition- (Abelisaurus comahuensis <- Ceratosaurus nasicornis) (modified from Holtz, 1994)
Other definitions- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Ceratosaurus nasicornis) (Tykoski and Rowe, 2004; modified from Padian et al., 1999)
(Carnotaurus sastrei + Noasaurus leali) (Wilson et al., 2003)
= "Abelisauroidea" Novas, 1989
= Abelisauroidea sensu Padian et al., 1999
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Ceratosaurus nasicornis)
Comments- Novas (1989) proposed Abelisauroidea to group abelisaurids with noasaurids.
References- Novas, 1989. Los dinosaurios carnivoros de la Argentina. PhD thesis. Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 510 pp.
Ezcurra and Agnolin, 2012. An abelisauroid dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Laurasia and its implications on theropod palaeobiogeography and evolution. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 123(3), 500-507.

Eoabelisaurus Pol and Rauhut, 2012
E. mefi Pol and Rauhut, 2012
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Canadon Asfalto Formation, Chubut, Argentina
Holotype
- (MPEF PV 3990) (adult) maxillary fragment, posterior skull, five cervical vertebrae, nine dorsal vertebrae, four dorsal ribs, sacrum (520 mm), twenty-seven caudal vertebrae, twenty-sex chevrons, scapulocoracoids (~720 mm), humeri (335 mm), radii (165 mm), ulnae (215 mm), distal carpals II, metacarpals I, phalanx I-1, manual unguals I, metacarpals II (74 mm), phalanges II-1, metacarpals III, phalanges III-1, phalanx III-2(?), metacarpals IV, phalanx, fused pelves, femora (640 mm), tibiotarsi (550 mm), fibulae, metatarsals I, phalanx I-1, metatarsals II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, metatarsals III (317 mm), phalanges III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanges III-3, pedal unguals III, metatarsals IV, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, seven pedal phalanges, pedal ungual, metatarsals V
Diagnosis- (after Pol and Rauhut, 2012) quadrate with thickened medial distal articular end and subparallel articular condyles; mid dorsal vertebrae with double, V-shaped lamina extending from the parapophysis to the prezygodiapophyseal lamina; ulna with hypertrophied olecranon process, accounting for more than 30% of its length; pubic foramen elongate, more than twice as long as high; ambiens process of pubis developed as a large, anterolaterally directed, convex expansion.
Comments- This specimen was discovered in 2009. Pol and Rauhut (2012) found it to be less derived than Kryptops, Rugops and abelisaurids, but more closely related to those than noasaurids. However, only one extra step was needed to place it as a non-abelisauroid abelisaurian. Novas et al. (2013) noted several supposed abelisaurid characters are present in non-abelisaurids, and the analysis of Tortosa et al. (2014) recovered it as sister to Abelisauria.
Reference- Pol and Rauhut, 2012. A Middle Jurassic abelisaurid from Patagonia and the early diversification of theropod dinosaurs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 279(1741), 3170-3175.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.
Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.

Ligabueino Bonaparte, 1996
= "Ligabueino" Bonaparte, 1995
L. andesi Bonaparte, 1996
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Puesto Antigual Member of La Amarga Formation, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (MACN-N 42) (.74 m) posterior cervical neural arch, dorsal centrum, two posterior dorsal neural arches, caudal vertebra, two manual phalanges III-?, ilium, incomplete pubes, femur (62 mm)
Comments- Bonaparte (1996) initially referred this to Abelisauroidea, possibly as a noasaurid, an assignment with which Carrano and Sampson (1998) concurred. Tortosa t al. (2014) recovered it as a noasaurid, but the more recent version of this analysis in Filippi et al. (2016) found it to be a non-abelisaurian abelisauroid closer to abelisaurs than Eoabelisaurus.
References- Bonaparte, 1995. Dinosaurios de America del Sur. Buenos Aires. 174 pp.
Bonaparte, 1996. Cretaceous tetrapods of Argentina. Muenchner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen. 30A, 73-130.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The Phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Agnolin and Chiarelli, 2010. The position of the claws in Noasauridae (Dinosauria: Abelisauroidea) and its implications for abelisauroid manus evolution. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 84, 293-300.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.
Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.
Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016. A new brachyrostran with hypertrophied axial structures reveals an unexpected radiation of latest Cretaceous abelisaurids. Cretaceous Research. 61, 209-219.

Abelisauria Novas, 1992
Definition- (Abelisaurus comahuensis + Noasaurus leali) (modified from Novas, 1997)
= Abelisauroidea sensu Wilson et al. 2003
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei + Noasaurus leali)
= Vitakrisauria Malkani, 2010
Diagnosis- (after Carrano et al., 2002) enlarged external mandibular fenestra; anterior end of external mandibular fenestra ventral to last dentary tooth; large socket in surangular for articulation with dentary; posteroventral dentary process extends posteriorly subequally to posterodorsal process; cervical neural spines anteroposteriorly short; humeral head globular; hypertrophied and flange-like femoral medial epicondyle; fibula fused to astragalar ascending process; double vascular grooves in pedal unguals; pedal ungual II asymmetrical.
Comments- Malkani (2010) proposed the theropod taxon Vitakrisauria for his new genus Vitakrisaurus (and presumably other taxa he referred to Vitakrisauridae- Vitakridrinda and Rajasaurus), but never states its diagnosis or relation to established theropod taxa like Abelisauria or Ceratosauria. It is probable he intended it as an inapprioriate replacement name for Abelisauria, similar to his use of Pakisauridae and Balochisauridae for Titanosauridae and Saltasauridae respectively. Until Vitakrisauria is given a justified usage, it is here synonymized with Abelisauria, which seems to include all three genera.
References- Malkani, 2010. Stratigraphy and mineral potential of Sulaiman (Middle Indus) basin, Pakistan. Sindh University Research Journal (Science Series). 42(2), 39-66.

Abelisauria incertae sedis

Betasuchus Huene, 1932
B. bredai (Seeley, 1883) Huene, 1932
= Megalosaurus bredai Seeley, 1883
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Maastricht Beds, Netherlands

Holotype- (BMNH 42997) incomplete femur (312 mm)
Comments- The term Ornithomimidorum is not a generic name, but rather the latinized form of ornithomimid. Ornithomimidorum gen. B refers to Huene transfering Megalosaurus bredai to the Ornithomimidae.
References- Seeley, 1883. On the dinosaurs from the Maastricht beds. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 39, 246-253.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.

undescribed abelisaurian (Gemmellaro, 1921)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Duwi Formation, Egypt

Material- (MGUP MEGA002) tooth (16.6x13x6.7 mm) (described by Smith and Lamanna, 2006)
(MGUP coll.) teeth, two unguals
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus crenatissimus by Gemmellaro (1921), but probably would not belong to that Malagasy taxon (now Majungasaurus). When reanalyzed by Smith and Lamanna (2006), one tooth was found to be 96.6% most similar to Majungasaurus, though the authors agreed the geographic distance and absence of other abelisaurids in their analysis meant it probably wasn't congeneric.
References- Gemmellaro, 1921. Rettili maëstrichtiani d'Egitto. Giornale di Scienze Naturali ed Economiche. 32, 339-351.
Smith and Lamanna, 2006. An abelisaurid from the Late Cretaceous of Egypt: Implications for theropod biogeography. Naturwissenschaften. 93(5), 242-245.

unnamed abelisaur (Stromer and Weiler, 1930)
Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Nubian Sandstone Formation, Egypt
Material
- (lost) proximal tibia
Comments- Buffetaut et al. (2005) noted this resembles abelisaurids in having a "proximally ascending cnemial crest and a fibular condyle confluent with the cnemial crest."
References- Stromer and Weiler, 1930. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. VI. Beschreibung von Wirbeltier-Resten aus dem nubischen Sandsteine Oberägyptens und aus ägyptischen Phosphaten nebst Bemerkungen über die Geologie der Umgegend von Mahamîd in Oberägypten [Results of the expeditions of Professor E. Stromer in the Egyptian deserts. IV. Description of vertebrate animal remains from the Nubian Sandstones of Lower Egypt and from the Egyptian Phosphates together with remarks about the geology of the Mahamîd region in Lower Egypt]. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 7, 1-42.
Buffetaut, Escuillie and Pohl, 2005. First theropod dinosaur from the Maastrichtian phosphates of Morocco. Kaupia. 14, 3-8.

undescribed abelisaurian (Gemmellaro, 1921)
Cretaceous(?)
India

Material- tooth
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus crenatissimus, but probably would not belong to that Malagasy taxon (now Majungasaurus).
References- Lydekker, 1879. Fossil Reptilia and Batrachia. Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India. Palaeontologia Indica, Series IV. Indian Pretertiary Vertebrata. 1(3), 1-36.
Gemmellaro, 1921. Rettili maëstrichtiani d'Egitto. Giornale di Scienze Naturali ed Economiche. 32, 339-351.

unnamed probable Abelisauria (Huene and Matley, 1933)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Material- (GSI 296) proximal femur (Novas et al., 2004)
(GSI K19/574) mid caudal vertebra (70 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/336A) distal metatarsal III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/336B) distal metatarsal III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/337 A) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/362) mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/396) unknown element (previously identified as calcaneum) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/399) pedal ungual (~140 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/612 in part) distal caudal vertebra (35 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/615; syntype of Dryptosauroides grandis) proximal dorsal rib (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/620) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/625) pedal ungual (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/670) two teeth
(GSI K27/476) basioccipital
(GSI K27/524) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/527) articular (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/530) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/533) four sacral centra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/534) pedal phalanx IV-? (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/535) jugal fragment (lost) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/536) caudal vertebra (115 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/537) pedal ungual IV
(GSI K27/540) partial fibula (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/542) distal caudal vertebra (25 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/543) pedal ungual (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/545) mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/546) proximal ischium (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/547; syntype of Dryptosauroides grandis) dorsal rib
(GSI K27/551) pedal ungual (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/552; lost) tibia (430 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/554) four sacral centra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/555; syntype of Dryptosauroides grandis) incomplete anterior cervical vertebra (120 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/556; lost) tibia (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/557) distal metatarsal III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/559) unknown element (originally identified as ilial fragment) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/560; lost) femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/561) distal caudal vertebra (65 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/563; lost) femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/564; lost) femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/566) mid chevron (120 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/567) ectopterygoid (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/569; lost) femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/572; lost) cervical vertebra (75 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/573) dentary (lost) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/576) basioccipital (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/579) tooth (34 x 20 x 9 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/581) partial jugal (lost) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/582) tooth (35 x 17 x 6.5 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/583) five teeth including premaxillary tooth (37 x 13.7 x 20 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/584) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/585) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/590) partial anterior dorsal vertebra (~90 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/591) axial centrum (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/592) vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/593) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/598) first sacral centrum (~120 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/603) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/605) distal caudal vertebra (38 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/606) distal caudal vertebra (60 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/607) distal caudal vertebra (70 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/608) distal caudal vertebra (40 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/609) distal caudal vertebra (45 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/610) distal caudal vertebra (45 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/611) distal caudal vertebra (55 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/612) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/613) vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/615) vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/616) mid caudal vertebhra (80 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/617) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/620) incomplete fibula (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/621; lost) distal femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/623; syntype of Dryptosauroides grandis) proximal dorsal rib (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/624; syntype of Dryptosauroides grandis) proximal dorsal rib (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/625; syntype of Dryptosauroides grandis) proximal dorsal rib (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/626) limb bone (lost) (originally identified as tibia)
(GSI K27/627; lost; caudal vertebra in Huene and Matley, 1933) proximal femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/628) basioccipital
(GSI K27/630) pedal ungual (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/631) pedal ungual (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/633; manual ungual in Huene and Matley, 1933) pedal ungual II (60 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/634) pedal ungual III
(GSI K27/635) pedal ungual II
(GSI K27/636) pedal ungual (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/639) pedfal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSi K27/640) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/641) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/642) pedal phalanx IV-I (31 mm) (manual in Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/643) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/645) unknown element (originally identified as manual phalanx) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/649) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/650) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/651) pedal phalanx I-1 (70 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/652) pedal phalanx I-1 (70 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/655) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/656) distal metatarsal IV (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/657) distal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/660) metatarsal IV (240 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/661) metatarsal IV (180 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/662; lost) tibia (200 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/663) metatarsal IV (220 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/664) metatarsal IV (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K/27/668) carpal or tarsal (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/669) distal limb bone (originally identified as tibia) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/670) tibia (lost)
(GSI K27/672) incomplete proximal chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/673) distal chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/674) distal chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/675) mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/675A) mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/676) mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/677) distal chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/678) incomplete mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/679) mid chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/680) distal chevron (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/683) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/686) proximal ischium (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/687) basioccipital (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/688) unknown element (originally identified as ectopterygoid) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/689) ectopterygoid (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/691) distal quadrate (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/692) partial medial gastralium (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/693) surangular (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/694) pedal phalanx (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/698) ectopterygoid (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/699) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/700) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/701) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/702) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/703) tooth (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/707) partial lateral gastralium (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/708) unknown element (originally identified as partial lacrimal) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/711) angular fragment (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/712) distal caudal vertebra (55 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
Comments- Basioccipital GSI K27/687 shows the exoccipitals floored the foramen magnum, and has an elongate occipital condyle neck, unlike GSI K27/628. Cervical vertebra GSI K27/572 differs from abelisauroids in its axially elongate and transversely narrow neural spine and and poorly developed epipophyses. Sacral vertebrae GSI K27/533 and 554 resemble Masiakasaurus, Rajasaurus and material referred to Lametasaurus in their transverse width and clear contact between successive centra. At least one chevron has open haemal canals, like Aucasaurus, but unlike Carnotaurus and Ilokelesia. Femora GSI K/560, 563, 564, 569, 621 and 627 are slender, unlike the robust femora assigned to Abelisauridae. They may belong to Noasauridae. Much of the material above is probably indeterminate at levels higher than Abelisauroidea, but is retained in this section for simplicity and because all diagnostic Lameta Formation theropod material appears to belong to this clade.
References- Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.

undescribed possible abelisaurian (Bonaparte and Powell, 1980)
Late Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lecho Formation, Salta, Argentina

Material- teeth
Comments- Said to be similar to Genyodectes and Majungasaurus.
Reference- Bonaparte and Powell, 1980. A continental assemblage of tetrapods from the upper Cretaceous beds of El Brete, northwestern Argentina (Sauropoda-Coelurosauria-Carnosauria-Aves). Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France. Nouvelle Série 59, 19-28.

unnamed abelisaurian (Astibia et al., 1990)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Unit S3U1, Spain

Material- femur, proximal femur
Description- More robust than Tarascosaurus, with a less anteriorly oriented femoral head.
Comments- Referred to as cf. Tarascosaurus by Le Loeuff and Buffetaut (1991).
References- Astibia, Buffetaut, Buscalioni, Cappetta, Corral, Estes, Garcia-Garmilla, Jaeger, Jimenez-Fuentes, Le Loeuff, Mazin, Orue-Extebarria, Pereda-Superbiola, Powell, Rage, Rordriguez-Lazaro, Sanz and Tong, 1990. The fossil vertebrates from Laño (Basque Country, Spain); New evidence on the composition and affinities of the Late Cretaceous continental faunas of Europe. Terra Research. 2, 460-466.
Le Loeuff and Buffetaut, 1991. Tarascosaurus salluvicus nov. gen., nov. sp., theropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of southern France. Géobios - Paléontologie, Stratigraphie, Paléoécologie. 24, 585-594.

unnamed abelisaurian (Russell, 1996)
Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous
Kem Kem beds, Morocco

Material- (CMN 50403; bone taxon C) incomplete posterior dorsal vertebra (158 mm)
Comments- Chiarenza and Cau (2016) note the large and heart-shaped neural canal of bone taxon C is similar to Libyan abelisaur PRC.NF.1.21, so propose they are closely related.
References- Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Museum national d'Histoire naturelle. 18, 349-402.
Chiarenza and Cau, 2016. A large abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Morocco and comments on the Cenomanian theropods from North Africa. PeerJ. 4:e1754.

undescribed abelisaurian (Gonzalez Riga and Calvo, 1999)
Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Anacleto Formation of Rio Colorado Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Reference- Gonzalez Riga and Calvo, 1999. Unusual caudal series of Titanosauridae of the Late Cretaceous in the Rio Colorado Formation, Neuquen and Mendoza Provinces, Argentina. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 29-30.

undescribed abelisaurian (Smith, Lamanna, Dodson, Attia and Lacovara, 2001)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Baharija Formation, Egypt

Material- teeth (FABL 7.5 mm)
Reference- Smith, Lamanna, Dodson, Attia and Lacovara, 2001. Evidence of a new theropod from the Late Cretaceous of Egypt. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 21(3), 102A.

unnamed Abelisauria (Candeiro, 2002)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Marilia Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil
Material
- (CPP 002, 020-021, 121, 123, 129b, 129c, 131, 132, 134-136, 144, 150, 154, 158, 161/1, 198, 205-207, 211, 242, 372, 375/2, 446, 451/1, 452/1, 463, 476-478) thirty-two teeth
References- Candeiro, 2002. Dentes de Theropoda da Formacao Marylia (Santoniano-Maastrichtiano), Bacia Bauru, Regiao de Peiropolis, Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Masters thesis, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro. 136 pp.
Candeiro, Bergqvist, Novas and Currie, 2004. Theropod teeth from the Marilia Formation (Upper Maastrichtian), Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 204A.
Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006. Tetrapods from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian-Maastrichtian) Bauru Group of Brazil: A reappraisal. Cretaceous Research. 27(6), 923-946.
Candeiro, Currie and Bergqvist, 2012. Theropod teeth from the Marília Formation (Late Maastrichtian) at the paleontological site of Peirópolis in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Geociências. 42(2), 323-330.

unnamed abelisaurian (Rauhut, 2005)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Material- (MB.R 1750) tibia
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

(MB.R 1751) tibia (255 mm)
?(MB.R 1756) distal ischium
Comments- Originally described as 'coelurosaurier B and C', Rauhut (2005) has identified the tibiae as abelisauroids. MB.R 1750 differs from 1751 in having a sharp ridge extend proximally from the latera malleolus, slightly broader facet for the astragalar ascending process, and narrower lateral fibular facet. They may be from different taxa, especially as MB.R 1750 comes from earlier sediments. The ceratosaurian distal ischium comes from the same locality as MB.R 1751 and is of similar size and preservation, so may be the same taxon.
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. Supplement VII, 1-99.
Rauhut, 2005. Post-cranial remains of 'coelurosaurs' (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Tanzania. Geological Magazine. 142(1), 97-107.

unnamed Abelisauria (Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006)
Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Adamantina Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil
Material
- (MMR/UFU-PV 0006) tooth (Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006)
(MPMA-12-00D1-97) tooth (29.1x15x7 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D3-97) tooth (28.2x11x5.5 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D4-97) tooth (25x10.9x5.5 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D5-97) tooth (26.2x11.6x5.7 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D7-97) tooth (18.3x11.2x5.5mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D10-97) tooth (10.8x5.4x3.7 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D11-97) tooth (15.7x7.5x4.5 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(MPMA-12-00D12-97) tooth (13.6x7.7x4.8 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
?(MPMA-12-00D13-97) tooth (12.6x7.4x3 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
?(MPMA-12-00D14-97) tooth (15.7x8.4x3.6 mm) (Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014)
(UFRJ-DG 371-Rd) tooth (Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006)
(UFRJ-DG 374-Rd) tooth (Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006)
(UFRJ-DG 378-Rd) tooth (Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006)
Comments- Tavares et al. (2014) described eight teeth as abelisaurid and two as dromaeosaurid (MPMA-12-00D13-97 and 14-97), but in their morphometric analyses, these were closer to each other than they were to sampled abelisaurids and dromaeosaurids. This and the absence of any clear dromaeosaurid characters (e.g. 8-shaped basal section, high DSDI) suggests all of the described teeth may belong to one abelisaur taxon.
References- Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006. Tetrapods from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian-Maastrichtian) Bauru Group of Brazil: A reappraisal. Cretaceous Research. 27(6), 923-946.
Tavares, Branco and Santucci, 2014. Theropod teeth from the Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group, Upper Cretaceous), Monte Alto, São Paulo, Brazil. Cretaceous Research. 50, 59-71.

unnamed Abelisauria (Osi and Apesteguia, 2008)
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Csehbanya Formation, Hungary

Material- (MTM V 2008.43.1) pedal ungual (Osi and Apesteguia, 2008)
(MTM coll.) fragmentary femur (Osi et al., 2012)
References- Osi and Apesteguia, 2008. Nonavian theropod dinosaur remains from the Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) Csehbánya Formation (Iharkút, Bakony Mountains, Western Hungary). EAVP 2008. 78-79.
Osi, Rabl, Makadl, Szentesi, Botfalval and Gulyas, 2012. The Late Cretaceous continental vertebrate fauna from Iharkút (Western Hungary): A review. In Godefroit (ed.). Bernissart Dinosaurs and Early Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. Indiana University Press. 532-569.
Osi and Buffetaut, in press.

undescribed Abelisauria (Coria, Currie, Koppelhus, Braun and Cerda, 2010)
Late Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Mulichinco Formation, Neuquen, Argentina

Reference- Coria, Currie, Koppelhus, Braun and Cerda, 2010. First record of a Valanginian (Early Cretaceous) dinosaur association from South America. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2010, 75A.

unnamed abelisaurian (Azevedo, Simbras, Furtado, Candeiro and Bergqvist, 2012)
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Presidente Prudente Formation, Brazil
Material
- (UFRJ-DG 254-R) ilial fragment (Azevedo, Simbras, Furtado, Candeiro and Bergqvist, 2012)
(UFRJ-DG 487-R) tooth (Alves, Bergqvist and Brito, 2016)
(UFRJ-DG 598-R) tooth fragment (Alves, Bergqvist and Brito, 2016)
(UFRJ-DG 599-R) tooth fragment (Alves, Bergqvist and Brito, 2016)
References- Azevedo, Simbras, Furtado, Candeiro and Bergqvist, 2012. First Brazilian carcharodontosaurid and other new theropod dinosaur fossils from the Campanian-Maastrichtian Presidente Prudente Formation, São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil. Cretaceous Research. 40, 131-142.
Alves, Bergqvist and Brito, 2016. New occurrences of microvertebrate fossil accumulations in Bauru Group, Late Cretaceous of western São Paulo state, Brazil. Journal of South American Earth Sciences. doi: 10.1016/j.jsames.2016.03.003

unnamed Abelisauria (Valentin, Godefroit, Tabuce, Vianey-Liaud, Wenhao and Garcia, 2012)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Vitrolles-La-Plaine, Provence, France
Material
- (UP-VLP-98A-002) tibiotarsus
(UP-VLP-98C-001) femur
Reference- Valentin, Godefroit, Tabuce, Vianey-Liaud, Wenhao and Garcia, 2012. First Late Maastrichtian (Latest Cretaceous) vertebrate assemblage from Provence (Vitrolles-la-Plaine, Southern France). In Godefroit (ed.). Bernissart Dinosaurs and Early Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. Indiana University Press. 582-597.

unnamed abelisaurian (Mendez, Novas and Iori, 2014)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Sao Jose do Rio Preto Formation, Brazil
Material
- (MPMA 08-0016-95) partial axis
Reference- Mendez, Novas and Iori, 2014. New record of abelisauroid theropods from the Bauru Group (Upper Cretaceous), Sao Paulo state, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia. 17(1), 23-32.

undescribed abelisaurian (Woolley, Sertich, Forster, Munyikwa, Sampson, Curry Rogers and Rogers, 2015)
Cretaceous
Gokwe Formation, Zimbabwe
Material
- (medium-sized) material including teeth and vertebrae
Reference- Woolley, Sertich, Forster, Munyikwa, Sampson, Curry Rogers and Rogers, 2015. Titanosaurian and other vertebrate remains from the Cretaceous Gokwe Formation, central Zimbabwe. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2015, 241.

Noasauridae Bonaparte and Powell, 1980
Definition- (Noasaurus leali <- Carnotaurus sastrei) (Wilson et al., 2003)
Other definitions- (Noasaurus leali <- Coelophysis bauri, Carnotaurus sastrei, Passer domesticus) (Sereno, in press)
= Noasaurinae Bonaparte and Powell, 1980 sensu Paul, 1988
= Velocisauridae Bonaparte, 1991
= Velocisaurinae Bonaparte, 1991 sensu Agnolin, Novas and Apesteguia, 2003
= "Vitakrisauridae" Malkani, 2010a
= "Vitakrisaurinae" Malkani, 2010a
= Vitakrisauridae Malkani, 2010c
= Vitakrisaurinae Malkani, 2010c
= Noasauridae sensu Sereno, in press
Definition- (Noasaurus leali <- Coelophysis bauri, Carnotaurus sastrei, Passer domesticus)
Diagnosis- (after Carrano et al., 2002; Sereno et al., 2004) palatal process of maxilla simple; anteroventral border of antorbital fenestra demarcated by a raised ridge; interdental plates obscured medially; presacral vertebrae without posterior pleurocoels; cervical neural spines located in the anterior half of centra; distal condyle of metatarsal IV <50% width of metatarsal II distal condyle.
Comments- Neither Coelophysis nor Passer seem particularily useful as external specifiers in Sereno's (in press) redefinition, as noasaurids have been universally considered abelisaurians since Paul (1988) and Bonaparte et al. (1990), and were never placed anywhere else besides the polyphyletic pre-cladistic Coelurosauria.
Malkani (2010a) first proposed Vitakrisauridae for Vitakridrinda, Rajasaurus "and its close relative" within abelisaurs. As he did not name Vitakrisaurus itself until six months later, this was a nomen nudum (ICZN Article 13.2). It is further invalid in lacking a diagnosis (13.1.1; Malkani merely says it's due to "complex characters of Vitakridrinda sulaimani", "very far locations from South America", and "an endemic character of its associated Balochisauridae and Pakisauridae"). The same issues invalidate his proposed subfamily Vitakrisaurinae, for Vitakridrinda only. Malkani (2010b) later used Vitakrisauridae in the title of a paper on Vitakridrinda, but Vitakrisaurus was still unnamed. In 2010c, Malkani officially named Vitakrisaurus and used both Vitakrisauridae and Vitakrisaurinae. These again lack diagnoses, but since Vitakrisaurus itself was given one, are valid. Vitakrisaurus and Vitakridrinda do not share any preserved elements, and contra Malkani, cannot be assumed to be related due to geography alone. Indeed, Vitakrisaurus seems to be a noasaurid while Vitakridrinda was described as having abelisaurid characters (e.g. rugose maxilla). Rajasaurus does not share any obvious characters with either, and has a robust metatarsal II unlike Vitakrisaurus and other noasaurids. Both Virakrisauridae and Vitakrisaurinae are thus made synonyms of Noasauridae.
References- Malkani, 2010a. New Pakisaurus (Pakisauridae, Titanosauria, Sauropoda) remains, and Cretaceous Tertiary (K-T) boundary from Pakistan. Sindh University Research Journal (Science Series). 42(1), 39-64.
Malkani, 2010b. Vitakridrinda (Vitakrisauridae, Theropoda) from the Latest Cretaceous of Pakistan. Journal of Earth Science. 21(Special Issue 3), 204-212.
Malkani, 2010c. Stratigraphy and mineral potential of Sulaiman (Middle Indus) basin, Pakistan. Sindh University Research Journal (Science Series). 42(2), 39-66.
Malkani, 2011. Vitakridrinda and Vitakrisaurus of Vitakrisauridae Theropoda from Pakistan. Proceedings of the 6th Symposium of IGCP 507 on Paleoclimates of the Cretaceous in Asia and their global correlation. Beijing, China. 59-66.

unnamed Noasauridae (Huene and Matley, 1933)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Material- (GSI K20/337B) pedal phalanx IV-2 (24 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/337C) distal metatarsal IV (metatarsal I of Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/619) incomplete premaxilla (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K20/626B) pedal phalanx IV-1 (48 mm) (manual in Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/524) pedal phalanx II-1 (56 mm), pedal ungual IV (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/525) pedal phalanx III-1 (76 mm)
(GSI K27/526) tibia (330 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/587) mid caudal vertebra (80 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/589) mid caudal vertebra (90 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/599) mid caudal vertebra (85 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/629) pedal ungual III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/632) pedal ungual II or IV (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/637) pedal phalanx IV-4 (28 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/638) pedal phalanx IV-3 (38 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/644) pedal phalanx III-1 (46 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/646) pedal phalanx III-2 or 3 (36 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/647) pedal phalanx IV-4 (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/648) pedal phalanx IV-I (26 mm) (manual in Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/659) metatarsal IV (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/665) distal metatarsal III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/666) distal metatarsal IV (metacarpal in Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/667) distal metatarsal II (manual in Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/671) distal metatarsal II (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/681) metatarsal III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
....(GSI K27/697) metatarsal III (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/684; identified as an astragalus by Huene and Matley, 1933) quadrate (Huene and Matley, 1933)
material including dentary (Wilson, 2012)
Comments- The premaxilla GSI K20/619 is excluded from Abelisauridae due to the lack of external texturing. The quadrate GSI K27/684 is excluded due to the lack of fusion with the quadratojugal. These are provisionally assumed to be noasaurid based on the apparent presence of only abelisaurians in the Lameta Forrmation. The pedal elements closely resemble Velocisaurus, so maybe from a noasaurid more derived than Deltadromeus. Carrano et al. (2011) noted they were more robust than Masiakasaurus. Carrano et al. reidentified GSI K27/648 as IV-1 (not IV-3), 646 as III-2 or 3 (not 1), 644 as III-1 (not III-3) and 629 as pedal ungual III (not IV). Wilson (2012)m noted new noasaurid remains including a dentary with procumbant anterior teeth as in Masiakasaurus. The above material may be referrable to Laevisuchus, Jubbulpuria, Ornithomimoides and/or Coeluroides.
References- Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.
Wilson, 2012. Small theropod dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous of India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 194.

undescribed possible noasaurid (Novas, Cladera and Puerta, 1996)
Cenomanian-Early Coniacian, Late Cretaceous
Rio Neuquen Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina
Material
- proximal humerus
Comments- Novas et al. (1996) mentioned this as an ornithomimid based on the ball-shaped articular head and shallow deltopectoral crest. However, these character are also found in abelisauroids, which are common in Late Cretaceous South America, unlike ornithomimosaurs.
Reference- Novas, Cladera and Puerta, 1996. New theropods from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 16(3), 56A.

unnamed Noasauridae (Russell, 1996)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kem Kem beds, Morocco

Material- (CMN 41873; bone taxon H) distal humerus (48 mm wide) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50811; bone taxon B) (juvenile) posterior cervical centrum (34 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(ROM 64666) (<1 year old juvenile) femur (204 mm) (Evans, Barrett, Brink and Carrano, 2015)
Comments- The humerus is very similar to Masiakasaurus. The cervical was considered a possible indeterminate noasaurid by McFeeters (2013).
References- Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Museum national d'Histoire naturelle. 18, 349-402.
McFeeters, 2013. Bone "taxon" B: Reevaluation of a supposed small theropod dinosaur from the Mid-Cretaceous of Morocco. Kirtlandia. 58, 38-41.
Evans, Barrett, Brink and Carrano, 2015. Osteology and bone microstructure of new, small theropod dinosaur material from the early Late Cretaceous of Morocco. Gondwana Research. 27(3), 1034-1041.

unnamed noasaurid (Lindoso, Medeiros, Carvalho and Marinho, 2012)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Alcantara Formation, Brazil
Material
- (UFMA 1.20.554) nine teeth (6-16 mm)
Reference- Lindoso, Medeiros, Carvalho and Marinho, 2012. Masiakasaurus-like theropod teeth from the Alcântara Formation, São Luís Basin (Cenomanian), northeastern Brazil. Cretaceous Research. 36, 119-124.

undescribed Noasauridae (Canale, Apesteguia, Gallina, Haluza, Gianechini and Pazo, 2014)
Late Berriasian-Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Bajada Colorada Formation, Neuquen, Argentina
Material
- (MMCh-PV-67) (~2 m) axis
(MMCh-PV-68-2) tooth
(MMCh-PV-68-3) tooth
(MMCh-PV-68-4) tooth
(MMCh-PV-68-5) tooth
Reference- Canale, Apesteguia, Gallina, Haluza, Gianechini and Pazo, 2014. Theropod remains from the Bajada Colorada Formation (Berriasian-Valanginian) from Neuquen Province, Argentina. Reunion de Comunicaciones de la Asociacion Paleontologica Argentina, abstracts. Ameghiniana. 52(1) suplemento, 5.

undescribed noasaurid (Brum, Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2015)
Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Adamantina Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Material- (DGM 929-R) mid cervical vertebra
Reference- Brum, Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2015. The first record of Noasauridae (Theropoda) from the Adamantina Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian), Bauru Group, Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2015, 98.

Coeluroides Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Coeluroides" Huene, 1932
C. largus Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Coeluroides largus" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Syntypes- (GSI K27/562) proximal caudal vertebra (92 mm)
(GSI K27/574) proximal caudal vertebra
Referred- (AMNH 1957) caudal vertebra (Chatterjee, 1978)
?(GSI K27/695) partial vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2004) wide, almost horizontally oriented and well separated mid-caudal zygapophyses; expanded and triangular mid caudal transverse processes with deeply excavated dorsal surface; transversely robust and axially elongate mid caudal neural spines.
Comments- Novas et al. (2004) believe the specimens closely resemble AMNH 1957 and Jubbulpuria, so may be synonymous with the latter, Compsosuchus and/or Laevisuchus. However, Wilson (2012) believes this is synonymous with (both species of?) Ornithomimoides as they share autapomorphies and are distinct from Jubbulpuria. He proposed sinking Ornithomimoides into Coeluroides, as the latter has page priority, but this is not acknowledged by the ICZN. As first revisor (Article 24.2.2), his determination would have force under the ICZN once properly published though. The taxa are kept separate here pending publication of Wilson's detailed reasoning.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Wilson, 2012. Small theropod dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous of India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 194.

Compsosuchus Huene and Matley,1933
= "Compsosuchus" Huene, 1932
C. solus Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Compsosuchus solus" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Holotype- (GSI K27/578) atlas, axis (40 mm)
Referred- (ISI I91/1) atlas, axis (Chatterjee and Rudra, 1996)
Comments- Novas et al. (2004) concluded that Compsosuchus is an indeterminate abelisaurid, since there are apparently no major differences from an atlas-axis complex referred to Indosaurus by Chatterjee and Rudra (1996). However, the latter is not necessarily Indosaurus, and may be Compsosuchus, making this reason moot. Carrano et al. (2011) described the axis of Masiakasaurus and noted Compsosuchus' was very similar except for a slightly more upturned atlantal intercentrum and a proportionally less projected odontoid, thus placing the taxon in Noasauridae instead.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Chatterjee and Rudra, 1996. KT events in India: Impact, rifting, volcanism and dinosaur extinction. In Novas and Molnar (eds.). Proceedings of the Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium. Memiors of the Queensland Museum. 39(3), 489-532.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.

Jubbulpuria Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Jubbulpuria" Huene, 1932
J. tenuis Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Jubbulpuria tenuis" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Syntypes- (GSI K20/612 in part) mid caudal vertebra (18 mm)
(GSI K27/614; lost) mid caudal vertebra (42 mm)
Referred- (GSI K27/599) distal caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
Diagnosis- (after Wilson, 2012) in prep.
Comments- Novas et al. (2004) determined the vertebrae were distal caudals, not dorsals as suggested by Huene and Matley (1933). Carrano et al. (2011) refined their placement to mid caudals. Jubbulpuria may be synonymous with Coeluroides since both taxa possess large, triangular, dorsally excavated transverse processes. Both may be synonymous with the noasaurid Laevisuchus based on resemblence to Masiakasaurus and Ligabueino. Wilson (2012) proposed Jubbulpuria may be synonymous with Leavisuchus as they are of similar size and differ in features attributable to intracolumnar variation, though they lack overlapping remains. He also stated Jubbulpuria is diagnostic.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.
Wilson, 2012. Small theropod dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous of India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 194.

Ornithomimoides? barasimlensis Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Ornithomimoides barasimlensis" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Syntypes- (GSI K27/531) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/541) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/604) proximal caudal vertebra (55 mm)
(GSI K27/682) proximal caudal vertebra (50 mm)
Diagnosis- (After Wilson, 2012) Possible junior synonym of Coeluroides largus.
Comments- Novas et al. (2004) determined the vertebrae were proximal caudals, not dorsals as suggested by Huene and Matley (1933). They suggested the material is indistinguishable from Dryptosauroides and Ornithomimoides mobilis. Carrano et al. (2011) retained GSI K/531 and 541 as dorsals, but 604 as a mid caudal. Wilson (2012) synonymized this with Coeluroides (and presumably O. mobilis) based on shared autapomorphies and differences from Jubbulpuria, seemingly as noasaurids. He proposed sinking Ornithomimoides into Coeluroides, as the latter has page priority, but this is not acknowledged by the ICZN. As first revisor (Article 24.2.2), his determination would have force under the ICZN once properly published though. The taxa are kept separate here pending publication of Wilson's detailed reasoning.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.
Wilson, 2012. Small theropod dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous of India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 194.

Ornithomimoides Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Ornithomimoides" Huene, 1932
O. mobilis Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Ornithomimoides mobilis" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Syntypes- (GSI K20/610) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K20/614B) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/586) proximal caudal vertebra (85 mm)
(GSI K27/597) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/600) proximal caudal vertebra
Diagnosis- (After Wilson, 2012) Possible junior synonym of Coeluroides largus.
Comments- Novas et al. (2004) determined the vertebrae were proximal caudals, not dorsals as suggested by Huene and Matley (1933). They suggested the material is indistinguishable from Dryptosauroides and Ornithomimoides? barasimlensis. Wilson (2012) synonymized this with Coeluroides (and presumably O? barasimlensis) based on shared autapomorphies and differences from Jubbulpuria, seemingly as noasaurids. He proposed sinking Ornithomimoides into Coeluroides, as the latter has page priority, but this is not acknowledged by the ICZN. As first revisor (Article 24.2.2), his determination would have force under the ICZN once properly published though. The taxa are kept separate here pending publication of Wilson's detailed reasoning.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Wilson, 2012. Small theropod dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous of India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 194.

"Sidormimus" Lyon, unpublished
= "Dogosaurus" anonymous, unpublished
Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation, Niger

Material- (~1 m) partial skeleton including cervical ribs, dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, uncinate processes, sacral vertebrae, scapula, coracoid, sternal plates, sternal ribs, humerus, radius, ulna, carpus, manus including manual digit II, phalanges, manual unguals and manual claw sheath, pelvis including pubis and hindlimb including femur, tibia, metatarsus, pedal pdigit II, pedal digit III, pedal digit IV and pedal unguals
Comments- This specimen was discovered in 2000 and immediately announced on the Project Exploration website with a photograph and the unofficial name "Sidormimus", due to its discovery by Chris Sidor. The same photo of the specimen was labeled "Dogosaurus" on a dispatch from Project Exploration on the National Geographic website (currently offline but preserved by web.archive.org). Sereno et al. (2004) first announced the specimen in print, stating it is an articulated skeleton preserving numerous abelisaur and noasaurid characters (e.g. pneumatized presacral and sacral neural arches; elongate presacral centra). It is also listed in Sereno and Brusatte (2008) as "undescribed noasaurid" in a faunal list, and is noted to have a pubic boot with limited expansion. Sidor (pers. comm. 2005) confirms the "Sidormimus" specimen is the Elrhaz noasaurid. It has yet to be described in detail, however. This has more recently been commented on by Sereno (2010), who notes it has long and robust posterior cervical ribs, dorsal centra more than twice as long as tall, five uncinate processes (unique among non-maniraptoran theropods), posteriorly directed glenoid, an enlarged coracoid, ossified sternal plates and ribs, forelimb 18% of hindlimb length, robust deltopectoral crest and olecranon process, manual digit II longer than III, straight manual unguals, tibia longer than femur, pedal digits II and IV much shorter than III, and short flat pedal unguals.
References- Lyon, 2000. http://web.archive.org/web/20121024124915/http://www.projectexploration.org/niger2000/9_15_2000.htm
http://web.archive.org/web/20001208070300/http://www.nationalgeographic.com/dinoquest/profile_01_dispatch2b.html
Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings of the Royal Society, Series B. 271, 1325-1330.
Sereno and Brusatte, 2008. Basal abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods from the Lower Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation of Niger. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 53(1), 15-46.
Keillor, Sereno and Masek, 2010. Range of movement in a noasaurid forelimb: In situ data and joint reconstruction. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2010, 114A.
Sereno, 2010. Noasaurid (Theropoda: Abelisauroidea) skeleton from Africa shows derived skeletal proportions and function. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2010, 162A.

Vitakrisaurus Malkani, 2010
V. saraiki Malkani, 2010
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Vitakri Formation, Pakistan

Holotype- (MSM-303-2) distal metatarsal II, phalanx II-1 (~24 mm), phalanx II-2 (~25 mm), pedal ungual II, distal metatarsal III?, pedal digit III, two phalanges IV-? (~21 mm)
Diagnosis- provisionally indeterminate within Noasauridae.
Comments- Malkani proposed the name Vitakrisaurus saraiki in 2010 for a pes he had previously referred to juvenile Vitakridrinda in 2009. As interpreted by Malkani, it would have some unique features (three phalanges on digit I; four phalanges on digit II), but Malkani only explicitly diagnoses it relative to the sauropod Pakisaurus. Thus it is uncertain how Vitakrisaurus is supposed to differ from other theropods, and note it cannot be compared to any of the material referred to Vitakridrinda in any case. The photo differs markedly from the illustration, with the dorsal illustration mislabaling phalanx II-2 a claw and placing a phalanx as it appears in the medial view. The supposed metatarsal I (mislabeled 'metacarpal') is too robust and elongate, but could be a metatarsal II which would match the phalangeal count. The area above that digit (seemingly representing digits II and III) is too blurry to comment on, though the drawing would be perfectly congruent with them being complete digits III and IV. The illustrated isolated 'phalange' below the ungual in medial view may be from digit IV, since most of that digit isn't actually visible in the dorsal view. The illustration also includes a supposed scale, but whether this is supposed to derive from Vitakrisaurus or something else like a fish is never stated. Based on its size, Vitakrisaurus is more comparable to noasaurids than abelisaurids. The large ratio between phalanges II-2 and II-1 and proximally narrow metatarsal II (in dorsal view) also suggest noasaurid affinities. While II-2 is longer than Velocisaurus (compared to II-1), this varies within other species, and further comparison is not possible pending better description of this and other noasaurid pes.
References- Malkani, 2009. New Balochisaurus (Balochisauridae, Titanosauria, Sauropoda) and Vitakridrinda (Theropoda) remains from Pakistan. Sindh University Research Journal (Science Series). 41(2), 65-92.
Malkani, 2010. Stratigraphy and mineral potential of Sulaiman (Middle Indus) basin, Pakistan. Sindh University Research Journal (Science Series). 42(2), 39-66.
Malkani, 2011. Vitakridrinda and Vitakrisaurus of Vitakrisauridae Theropoda from Pakistan. Proceedings of the 6th Symposium of IGCP 507 on Paleoclimates of the Cretaceous in Asia and their global correlation. Beijing, China. 59-66.

Laevisuchus
Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Laevisuchus" Huene, 1932
L. indicus Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Laevisuchus indicus" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Syntypes- (GSI K27/588; lost) mid dorsal vertebra (35 mm)
(GSI K20/613; lost) seventh or eighth cervical vertebra (40 mm)
(GSI K20/614; lost) fifth cervical vertebra
(GSI K27/696) sixth cervical vertebra (42 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2004) differs from Noasaurus in- shallower antediapophyseal, diapophyseal and postdiapophyseal fossae in cervical vertebrae; wider and less ventrally directed cervical diapophyses; cervical neural spines less excavated anteriorly and posteriorly; shorter cervical prezygopophyses; postzygapophyses posteriorly rounded in dorsal view. Differs from Masiakasaurus in- less excavated space between postzygapophyses; thinner prezygapophyses; shallower infrapostzygapophyseal and infraprezygapophyseal fossae.
Comments- Carrano et al. (2011) identified the vertebral positions based on comparison to Masiakasaurus.
Wilson (2012) proposed Jubbulpuria may be synonymous with Leavisuchus as they are of similar size and differ in features attributable to intracolumnar variation, though they lack overlapping remains.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.
Wilson, 2012. Small theropod dinosaurs from the Latest Cretaceous of India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 194.

Austrocheirus Ezcurra, Agnolin and Novas, 2010
A. isasii Ezcurra, Agnolin and Novas, 2010
Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Pari Aike Formation, Santa Cruz, Argentina
Holotype
- (MPM-PV 10003) (~7-8 m; young adult) incomplete mid caudal centra, three partial mid caudal neural arches, incomplete metacarpal III (?), incomplete phalanx III-1(?), distal tibia, metatarsal II fragment, distal metatarsal III, three distal pedal phalanges
Diagnosis- (after Ezcurra et al., 2010) metacarpal III with dorsoventrally tapering shaft towards proximal end; posteriorly displaced collateral tendon fossae located at same level of the proximal end of distal condyles on metacarpal III; pedal phalanges with conspicuous longitudinal crest delimitating dorsal margin of distal collateral tendon fossae.
Comments- Varela (2011) revised the age and nomenclature of the formation Orkoraptor was found in. The holotype was discovered in 2002 and described in 2010 as an abelisauroid outside the Rugops+Abelisauridae clade by Ezcurra et al.. Rauhut (2012) later doubted its ceratosaurian identity as no megaraptorans or coelurosaurs were included in Ezcurra et al.'s analysis, and several supposedly ceratosaurian characters have a wider distribution within those clades. Further, he doubted the identification of metacarpal III and suggested the manual phalanx may be pedal. Rauhut thus placed Austrocheirus as Theropoda indet., but it is here tentatively retained as a valid abelisauroid as Cau's (online, 2010) larger unpublished analysis including megaraptorans and coelurosaurs still recovered it as an abelisauroid. Novas et al. (2013) defended the identity of metacarpal III and the manual phalanx. Most recently, Tortosa et al. (2014) recovered Austrocheirus as a noasaurid. As metatarsal II is unreduced in width, it is here placed basal to Velocisaurus, Masiakasaurus and Noasaurus.
References- Cau, online 2010. http://theropoda.blogspot.com/2010/05/austrocheirus-ezcurra-et-al-2010-una.html
Ezcurra, Agnolin and Novas, 2010. An abelisauroid dinosaur with a non-atrophied manus from the Late Cretaceous Pari Aike Formation of southern Patagonia. Zootaxa. 2450, 1-25.
Varela, 2011. Sedimentología y modelos deposicionales de la Formación Mata Amarilla, Cretácico de la cuenca austral, Argentina. PhD thesis, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 287 pp.
Rauhut, 2012. A reappraisal of a putative record of abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of England. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 123(5), 779-786.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.

Velocisaurus Bonaparte, 1991
V. unicus Bonaparte, 1991
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Bajo de la Carpa Formation of the Rio Colorado Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (MUCPv 41) (gracile) tibia (140 mm), astragalus, partial metatarsal II, phalanx II-1 (23 mm), phalanx II-2 (15 mm), metatarsal III (90 mm), phalanx III-1 (23 mm), phalanx III-2 (20 mm), phalanx III-3 (16 mm), partial metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1 (15 mm), phalanx IV-2 (12 mm), phalanx IV-3 (7 mm), phalanx IV-4 (5 mm), pedal ungual IV (15 mm)
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Bajo de la Carpa Formation of the Rio Colorado Subgroup, Rio Negro, Argentina

Referred- (MPCN-PV-370) (robust) incomplete femur (112.1 mm), incomplete tibia (142.7 mm), fibular fragment, partial metatarsal II, phalanx II-1 (21 mm), incomplete metatarsal III (85.7 mm), phalanx III-1 (16.8 mm), partial metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1 (12.4 mm), phalanx IV-2 (12 mm), pedal ungual Iv (11.2 mm) (Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013; described by Brissón Egli, Agnolin and Novas, 2016)
Diagnosis- (after Brisson Egli et al., 2016) femur with lateral and medial surfaces converging anteriorly and resulting in thick dorsoventral crest; tibia with distal end anteriorly flat, with large surface to accommodate tall and wide astragalar ascending process; pedal phalanx IV-1 medially curved (also in GSI K20/626B).
Other diagnoses- Brisson Egli et al. (2016) listed the strongly subtriangular cross-section of the proximal femur as diagnostic, but noted this is also present in Masiaksaurus (unknown in other noasaurids). The long and slender tibia is true of most small theropods. The rod-like metatarsal II and IV shafts are plesiomorphic compared to Masiakasaurus and Noasaurus. Masiakasaurus also has a pedal phalanx IV-1 which is transversely compressed, probably narrow dorsally (described as elliptical), and described as short.
Comments- Brisson Egli et al. (2014) note the side metatarsals are plesiomorphically rounded, unlike the strap-like elements in Masiakasaurus and Noasaurus, thus it is placed outside a clade formed by the latter here.
References- Bonaparte, 1991. Los vertebrados fósiles de la Formación Rio Colorado, de la Ciudad de Neuquén y Cercanías, Cretácico Superior, Argentina. Revista del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" e Instituto Nacional de Investigación de las Ciencias Naturales: Paleontología. 4(3), 17-123.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.
Brisson Egli, Agnolin and Novas, 2014. New specimen of Velocisaurus unicus (Theropoda, Abelisauroidea) from the Paso Cordova locality (Santonian), Rio Negro. Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontologia de Vertebrados. Ameghiniana. 51(6) suplemento, 5.
Brissón Egli, Agnolin and Novas, 2016. A new specimen of Velocisaurus unicus (Theropoda, Abelisauroidea) from the Paso Córdoba locality (Santonian), Río Negro, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2016.1119156

Masiakasaurus Sampson, Carrano and Forster, 2001
M. knopfleri Sampson, Carrano and Forster, 2001
Middle Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Anembalemba Member of Maevarano Formation, Madagascar

Holotype- (UA 8680) incomplete dentary
Paratypes- (FMNH PR 2108) pubis
(FMNH PR 2109) pubis
(FMNH PR 2110) mid caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2111) ?dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2112) (gracile) tibia (191.3 mm)
(FMNH PR 2113) dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2114) dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2115) (gracile) femur
(FMNH PR 2116) (robust) tibia (189.2 mm), partial fibula, astragalocalcaneum
(FMNH PR 2117) (robust) femur (189.4 mm)
(FMNH PR 2118) (gracile) tibia
(FMNH PR 2119) (robust) tibia
(FMNH PR 2120) (gracile) femur (190.8 mm)
(FMNH PR 2121) (gracile) tibia (171.5 mm)
(FMNH PR 2122) (robust) tibia, partial fibula, astragalocalcaneum
(FMNH PR 2123) (robust) femur (202.5 mm)
(FMNH PR 2124; mistakenly labeled 2183 by Carrano et al., 2002 in fig. 4) splenial
(FMNH PR 2125) mid caudal
(FMNH PR 2126) mid caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2127) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2128) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2129) pedal phalanx II-1
(FMNH PR 2130) pedal phalanx IV-3
(FMNH PR 2131) pedal phalanx IV-3
(FMNH PR 2132) manual phalanx I-1(?)
(FMNH PR 2133) proximal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2134) pedal ungual
(FMNH PR 2135) pedal ungual II/IV
(FMNH PR 2136) manual ungual, pedal phalanx II-2
(FMNH PR 2137) dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2138) dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2139) seventh cervical vertebra
(FMNH PR 2140) tenth cervical vertebra
(FMNH PR 2141) eighth cervical vertebra
(FMNH PR 2142) third-fifth sacral vertebrae
(FMNH PR 2143) incomplete humerus
(FMNH PR 2144) fourth dorsal neural arch
....(FMNH PR 2145) dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2146; mistakenly labeled 2147 by Carrano et al. (2002) in fig. 19) metatarsal III
(FMNH PR 2147) metatarsal II
(FMNH PR 2148) (gracile) femur
(FMNH PR 2149) (robust) femur
(FMNH PR 2150) (gracile) femur
(FMNH PR 2151) metatarsal II
(FMNH PR 2152) (gracile) distal tibia
(FMNH PR 2153) (gracile) femur
(FMNH PR 2154) metatarsal II
(FMNH PR 2155) metatarsal III
(FMNH PR 2156) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2157) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2158) pedal phalanx IV-1
(FMNH PR 2159) pedal phalanx III-1
(FMNH PR 2160) pedal phalanx II-1
(FMNH PR 2161) pedal phalanx II-1
(FMNH PR 2162) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2163) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2164) lateral tooth
(FMNH PR 2165) anterior tooth
(FMNH PR 2167) pedal phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2
(FMNH PR 2168) distal caudal vertebra
(FMNH PR 2169) manual ungual
(FMNH PR 2170) lateral tooth
(FMNH PR 2171) dorsal centrum
(FMNH PR 2172) pedal phalanx IV-1
(FMNH PR 2173) pedal phalanx III-2
(FMNH PR 2174) pedal phalanx IV-3
(FMNH PR 2175) distal metatarsal II
(FMNH PR 2176) pedal phalanx III-2
(FMNH PR 2177) dentary
(FMNH PR 2178) dentary
(FMNH PR 2179) dentary
(FMNH PR 2180) anterior tooth
(FMNH PR 2181) two lateral teeth
(FMNH PR 2182) lateral tooth
(UA 8681) (gracile) femur (202.5 mm)
(UA 8682) pedal phalanx (mistakenly listed as a dentary by Carrano et al., 2002- Caranno et al., 2011)
(UA 8683) distal metatarsal II
(UA 8684) (robust) femur (201.6 mm)
(UA 8685) (robust) tibia (205.4 mm)
(UA 8686) pedal phalanx IV-4
(UA 8687) (gracile) two vertebrae, tibia
(UA 8688) mid caudal vertebra
(UA 8689) distal caudal vertebra
(UA 8690) distal caudal vertebra
(UA 8691) distal caudal vertebra
(UA 8692) mid caudal vertebra
(UA 8693) humeral shaft
(UA 8694) humeral shaft
(UA 8695) distal caudal vertebra
(UA 8696) distal caudal vertebra
Referred- (FMNH PR 2100) lateral tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2101) lateral tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2183) maxilla (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2199) lateral tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2200) anterior tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2201) latreral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2202) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2203) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2205) pedal phalanx (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2206) metatarsal II (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2207) dorsal centrum (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2208) (robust) femur (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2214) (gracile) tibia (151.2 mm), metatarsal IV (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2215) (gracile) femur (180 mm) (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2216) pedal phalanx IV-2 (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2217) pedal phalanx II-2 (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2218) pedal phalanx III-1 (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2219) pedal phalanx III-2/3 (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2220) anterior tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2221) lateral tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2222) dentary (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2223) two pedal phalanges (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2224) manual phalanx I-1(?) (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2225) two manual phalanges (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2227) manual phalanx (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2229) dorsal centrum (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2230) proximal caudal centrum (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2234) proximal metatarsal IV (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2235) calcaneum (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2236) pedal ungual (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2453) partial premaxilla (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2454) prearticular (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2455) incomplete angular (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2456) postorbital (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2458) dorsal neural arch, partial fourth dorsal rib, mid caudal vertebra, distal caudal vertebra, scapula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2459) metatarsal IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2460) fused third to sixth sacral centra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2461) proximal pubis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2462) axis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2463) incomplete pubis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2464) cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2465) fifth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2466) axis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2467) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2468) partial ischium (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2469) proximal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2470) fused pubes (one incomplete, one distal) (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2471) dentary (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2472) ilium (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2473) partial lacrimal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2475) frontal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2476) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2477) atlantal intercentrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2478) rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2479) pedal phalanx IV-2/3 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2480) pedal phalanx III-2 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2481) hyoid, atlantal intercentrum (5 mm), ~fifth cervical neural arch, sixth cervical vertebra (32.7 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (29.4 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (26.5 mm), proximal fourth cervical rib, proximal tenth cervical rib, two proximal cervical ribs, fifth dorsal vertebra (26.9 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (28 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (28.7 mm), ~eleventh dorsal vertebra (29 mm), ~twelfth dorsal vertebra (29.6 mm), ~thirteenth dorsal vertebra (29.3 mm), ~fourteenth dorsal vertebra (28.9 mm), three partial dorsal ribs, three rib fragments, fused anterior gastralia, sacrum (148.8 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (29.3 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (29.1 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (29 mm), mid caudal vertebra (28.9 mm), proximal caudal neural arch, mid caudal vertebra (29.8 mm), distal caudal vertebra (30 mm), distal caudal vertebra (31.2 mm), distal caudal vertebra (31.1 mm), distal caudal vertebra, distal caudal vertebra (31 mm), distal caudal vertebra (29.2 mm), three caudals, chevron, scapulae (128.4, 128.2 mm), coracoids (one fragmentary; 38 mm), humerus (94.3 mm), ilia (187.2 mm), pubes (206 mm), femora (one distal; ~193.6 mm), tibiae (195.8, 196.9 mm), fibulae (one incomplete; 189.6 mm), astragali, distal tarsal III, metatarsals II (one distal; 93.2 mm), metatarsal III (112 mm), phalanx III-1 (28.2 mm), phalanx III-2/3 (18.2 mm) (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2482) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2485) fourth cervical vertebra (24.7 mm), ~sixth cervical vertebra (25.4 mm), ~seventh cervical vertebra (23.4 mm), fourth cervical rib, sixth cervical rib, proximal seventh cervical rib, second dorsal vertebra, fourth dorsal neural arch, two dorsal neural arches, ~fourth dorsal rib, dorsal rib, five rib fragments, first sacral centrum (22.2 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (28.3 mm), mid caudal vertebra (23.2 mm), distal caudal vertebra (25.4 mm), distal caudal vertebra (27.3 mm), distal caudal vertebra (25.5 mm), two caudals, vertebra, chevron, humerus (80.8 mm), incomplete ilium (146.3 mm), incomplete ischia, femora (160.7, 159.8 mm), tibiae (173.7, 171.7 mm), proximal fibulae, metatarsal III (96.4 mm), distal metatarsal IV, pedal phalanx (14.8 mm), pedal ungual II/IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2486) pedal ungual II/IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2490) caudal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2491) tenth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2492) three distal caudal vertebrae (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2493) pedal phalanx (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2495) ?laterosphenoid (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2496) partial quadrate (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2603) rib fragments (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2604) pedal phalanx II-2 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2605) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2606) scapula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2610) dorsal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2611) pedal phalanx (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2613) pedal phalanx III-? (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2614) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2616) pedal phalanx II-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2617) pedal phalanx III-? (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2618) neural arch (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2628) sixth cervical verterbra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2630) antlantal intercentrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2632) rib fragment (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2634) proximal rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2636) fourth dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2638) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2642) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2667) pedal ungual II/IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2672) tenth cervical or first dorsal rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2673) chevron (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2677) centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2679) distal metatarsal II (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2684) third dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2685) rib fragment (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2686) tibia (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2687) distal tarsal III, proximal metatarsal III (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2696) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2699) caudal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2700) caudal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2709) pedal phalanx II-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2817) tibia (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2818) anterior tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(FMNH PR 2837) first dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(MNHN.MAJ 249) tooth (Smith, 2007)
(MSNM V5378) fourth or fifth dentary tooth (13 mm) (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(UA 8700) pedal phalanx III-1 (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8701) dorsal centrum (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8702) distal caudal (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8703) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8710) (gracile) proximal tibia (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8711) (gracile) tibia (167.6 mm) (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8712) (robust) femur (168.3 mm) (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8713) pedal phalanx (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 8714) pedal phalanx (Carrano et al., 2002)
(UA 9090) postorbital (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9091) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9092) posterior dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9093) centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9094) pedal ungual III (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9095) frontal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9096) pedal phalanx IV-2 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9097) posterior dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9098) partial fifth sacral vertebra, sixth sacral vertebra, incomplete fibula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9099) proximal tibia (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9100) incomplete pubis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9101) metatarsal IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9102) distal tarsal III fused to metatarsal III (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9103) posterior dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9104) proximal ninth cervical rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9105) rib fragments, metatarsal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9106) fourth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9107) second dorsal neural arch (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9108) dorsal transverse process (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9109) neural arch (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9110) caudal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9111) seventh cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9112) proximal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9113) caudal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9115) first sacral vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9116) scapula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9117) pubic shaft (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9118) distal metatarsal ?I (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9119) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9120) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9121) third cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9122) metatarsal II (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9123) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9126) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9127) caudal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9128) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9130) axial neural arch (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9132) partial fibula, pedal phalanx (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9133) proximal ischium (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9134) proximal fibula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9135) distal femur (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9136) pubic shaft (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9137) pedal phalanx IV-2 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9138) distal metatarsal II (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9139) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9140) caudal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9142) distal tibia (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9143) partial fibula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9144) pedal ungual (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9145) dentary (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9146) proximal metacarpal ?IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9147) incomplete angular (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9148) caudal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9149) prearticular (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9150) ninth cervical vertebra, tenth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9151) caudal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9152) mid chevron (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9153) proximal pubis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9154) pedal phalanx II-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9155) proximal dorsal rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9156) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9157) pedal ungual III (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9158) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9159) lateral tooth, coracoid (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9160) proximal ~fourth dorsal rib, incomplete scapulocoracoid (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9162) proximal pubis (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9163) distal metatarsal IV (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9164) dorsal neural arch (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9165) proximal humerus (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9166) prearticular, articular (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9167) fibula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9168) ischium (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9169) proximal sixth cervical rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9170) partial ilium, femur (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9171) eighth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9172) ischium, incomplete fibula (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9173) proximal caudal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9174) caudal neural arch (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9175) posterior dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9176) posterior dorsal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9177) dentary (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9178) basioccipital (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9179) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9180) chevron (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9181) eighth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9182) chevron (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9183) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9185) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9186) pedal phalanx III-? (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9187) caudal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9188) pedal phalanx II-1 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9189) fourth cervical vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9190) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9192) pedal phalanx III-? (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9193) femur (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9194) manual phalanx (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9195) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9196) chevron (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9197) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9198) pedal ungual (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9199) pedal phalanx III-2/3 (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9613) distal tibia (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9734) lateral tooth (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9773) distal metatarsal (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9774) distal metatarsal II (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9857) distal caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9858) mid caudal vertebra (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9859) cervical centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9861) proximal rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9862) proximal ~fourth dorsal rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9863) proximal rib (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
Early Maastrichtian(?), Late Cretaceous
Masorobe Member of Maevarano Formation, Madagascar

(FMNH PR 2457) (subadult) posterior braincase (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
(UA 9184) caudal centrum (Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011)
Diagnosis- (after Carrano et al., 2002) anterior four dentary teeth procumbent, the first inclined at 108 above the horizontal and lying in an alveolus that is slung below the ventral margin of the dentary; first alveolus large and ventrally expanded, lying lateral to an anteroposteriorly long dentary symphysis; lower dentition markedly heterodont: the first four teeth are weakly spoon-shaped, elongate, and terminate in a posteriorly hooked, pointed apex; anterior dentary teeth bear two weakly serrated posterior carinae and have faint posterior ridges; more posterior teeth are transversely compressed, recurved, and have a serrated posterior carina.
Comments- Carrano et al. (2011) reidentified a number of elements from Sampson et al. (2001) and/or Carrano et al. (2002). The possible angular (FMNH PR 2166) is an unknown element from an unknown taxon. FMNH PR 2198, 2226 and 2228 are reidentified as juvenile Majungasaurus teeth, contra Carrano et al. (2002). FMNH PR 2204 is a crocodyliform proximal caudal vertebra. FMNH PR 2136 and 2217 are manual phalanges instead of pedal phalanges.
References- Sampson, Nyit, Forster, Suny, Krause and Suny, 1998. The Late Cretaceous dinosaurs of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 74A.
Sampson, Carrano, and Forster. 2000. A theropod dinosaur with bizarre dentition from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(3), 66A.
Sampson, Carrano and Forster, 2001. A bizarre predatory dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Nature. 409, 504-506.
Carrano, Sampson and Forster, 2002. The osteology of Masiakasaurus knopfleri, a small abelisauroid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 510-534.
Carrano, Sampson and Loewen, 2004. New discoveries of Masiakasaurus knopfleri and the morphology of the Noasauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 27A-28A.
Fanti and Therrien, 2007. Theropod tooth assemblages from the Late Cretaceous Maevarano Formation and the possible presence of dromaeosaurids in Madagascar. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 52(1), 155-166.
Smith, 2007. Dental morphology and variation in Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8. 103-126.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.
Lee and O'Connor, 2011. Variation in bone histology and growth of the noasaurid theropod Masiakasaurus knopfleri. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 142.

Noasaurus Bonaparte and Powell, 1980
N. leali Bonaparte and Powell, 1980
Late Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lecho Formation, Salta, Argentina

Holotype- (PVL 4061) maxilla (78 mm), quadrate (45 mm), fourth cervical neural arch, fourth cervical rib (48 mm), tenth cervical or first dorsal rib, dorsal centrum, manual phalanx III-? (17 mm), manual ungual ?II (37 mm), metatarsal II (113 mm)
....(MACN 622) (adult) anterior cervical vertebra (34.4 mm) (Frankfurt and Chiappe, 1999)
Referred- manual ungual ?II (Agnolin, Apesteguia and Chiarelli, 2004)
Diagnosis- (after Bonaparte and Powell, 1980) very deep and subtriangular ventral concavity on manual ungual ?II[pedal ungual II in original].
(After Agnolin et al., 2004) both sides of manual ungual ?II sub-parallel in dorsal view.
(after Angnolin and Chiarelli, 2009) median ventral ridge distal to proximoventral concavity on manual ungual ?II.
(after Caranno et al., 2011) compared to Masiakasaurus- narrower antorbital fossa; anterior margin of antorbital fenestra reaches to fifth alveolus; quadrate shaft more strongly curved; medial collateral ligament pit on metatarsal IV internally subdivided; more distinct distal intercondylar sulcus on metatarsal IV.
Comments- The squamosal originally identified is a cervical rib (Bonaparte, 1991), further identified as the tenth (or the first dorsal) rib by Carrano et al. (2011). Carrano et al. also identified the cervical neural arch and rib as the fourth based on comparison to Masiakasaurus. A cervical vertebra (MACN 622) discovered with the holotype was originally identified as an oviraptorosaur (Frankfurt and Chiappe, 1999), but reidentified by Agnolin and Martinelli (2007) as a noasaurid, and probably part of the Noasaurus holotype individual.
Noasaurus was originally described by Bonaparte and Powell (1980) as preserving a hyperextendable pedal phalanx II-2 and enlarged and trenchant pedal ungual II as in deinonychosaurs. However, Agnolin et al. (2004) and Agnolin and Chiarelli (2009) found a series of manual characters and abelisauroid synapomorphies in the phalanx and ungual. Similarly, Carrano et al. (2004; 2011) compared the phalanx favorably to manual phalanges FMNH PR 2136 and 2217 of Masiakasaurus, which has very different unguals on its pes. Agnolin et al. proposed the ungual was from digit II based on the symmetry of the proximal articular facets, but Agnolin and Chiarelli suggested it was from I or II based on its "strong curvature and general morphology", though their figure caption lists it as from II or III. Carrano and Sampson (2008) suggested Bonaparte and Powell had the phalanx upside down, but Agnolin and Chiarelli noted several characters indicating its manual identification and an abelisauroid synapomorphy that work using the original orientation, so that is preferred here. Carrano et al. (2011) suggested the proportions of the phalanx might indicate it was penultimate, but Agnolin and Chiarelli noted the short and broad proportions were like digit III and that contra the original description, it does not articulate well with the ungual.
References- Bonaparte and Powell, 1980. A continental assemblage of tetrapods from the upper Cretaceous beds of El Brete, northwestern Argentina (Sauropoda-Coelurosauria-Carnosauria-Aves). Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France. Nouvelle Série. 19, 19-28.
Bonaparte, 1991. The Gondwanian theropod families Abelisauridae and Noasauridae. Historical Biology. 5, 1-25.
Frankfurt and Chiappe, 1999. A possible oviraptorosaur from the Late Cretaceous of northwestern Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(1), 101-105.
Agnolin, Apesteguia and Chiarelli, 2004. The end of a myth: The mysterious ungual claw of Noasaurus leali. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 301A-302A.
Carrano, Sampson and Loewen, 2004. New discoveries of Masiakasaurus knopfleri and the morphology of the Noasauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2004. 28.
Agnolin and Martinelli, 2007. Did oviraptorosaurs (Dinosauria; Theropoda) inhabit Argentina? Cretaceous Research. 28(5), 785-790.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Agnolin and Chiarelli, 2010. The position of the claws in Noasauridae (Dinosauria: Abelisauroidea) and its implications for abelisauroid manus evolution. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 84, 293-300.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.

Abelisauridae sensu Wilson et al., 2003
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Noasaurus leali)
= Abelisauridae sensu Sereno, in press
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Coelophysis bauri, Noasaurus leali, Passer domesticus)
Diagnosis- (after Carrano et al., 2002) sculpturing on craniofacial elements; ventral extent of antorbital fossa absent; pneumatic nasal foramina; suborbital process on postorbital; postorbital contacts lacrimal above orbit; enlarged parietal nuchal crest; broad cervical prespinal fossa; posterior dorsal parapophyses and transverse processes joined by web.

"Carnosaurus" Huene, 1929
Late Cretaceous
east of Colhue Huapi Lake and north of Chico River, Chubut Group(?), Chubut, Argentina
Material-
(MACN coll.) tooth (23 x 12.5 x 6 mm)
Comments- Carnosaurus was listed by Huene (1929) in a faunal list for three specimens- a metapodial (MLP CS 1240) from the Allen Formation, a tooth (MACN coll.) perhaps from the Chubut group, and provisionally ("Cf. Carnosaurus") a tooth (MLP coll.) from the Plottier Formation. As Olshevsky (DML, 1999) noted, the name is probably a typographical error for Carnosauria made when translating the paper from German to Spanish. This is indicated by the fact he never attaches a name to these specimens in the description or plates, and indeed states on of the specimens is taxonomically indistinguishable from another named genus. Since "Carnosaurus" was apparently not meant as a valid name when it was published (ICZN Article 11.5), it is a nomen nudum. The metapodial is here identified as a sauropod or ankylosaur metatarsal, while the Plottier tooth was only questionably referred by Huene, thus leaving the Chubut tooth as the specimen best discussed under "Carnosaurus".
The Chubut tooth is merely described under the heading "tooth of a carnivorous saurischian from the Chico River". The mesial edge is slightly concave and the distal edge slightly convex. It has fine longitudinal ridges, and 30 serrations per 5 mm which are perpendicular to the edge. Huene stated there was no difference between it and teeth he referred to Loncosaurus except for the less curved mesial edge, which he felt could be explained by a different position in the jaw. It compares well with abelisaurids in all variables except the greater serration density, so may be a member of that clade.
References- Huene, 1929. Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html

Dryptosauroides Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Dryptosauroides" Huene 1932
D. grandis Huene and Matley, 1933
= "Dryptosauroides grandis" Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Syntypes- (GSI K20/334) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K20/609) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/549) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/601) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/602) proximal caudal vertebra
(GSI K27/626) proximal caudal vertebra
Diagnosis- Provisionally indeterminate at the level of Abelisauridae.
Comments- Novas et al. (2004) determined the vertebrae were proximal caudals, not dorsals as suggested by Huene and Matley (1933). They are indistinguishable from Ornithomimoides mobilis and O? barasimlensis.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley. 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.

Tarascosaurus Le Loeuff and Buffetaut, 1991
T. salluvicus Le Loeuff and Buffetaut, 1991
Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Fuvelian beds, France

Holotype- (FSL 330201) proximal femur (~350 mm)
Paratype- ....(FSL 330202) fragment of ~sixth dorsal vertebra, partial ~seventh dorsal vertebra (~45 mm)
Referred- ?(FSL 330203) caudal centrum (Le Loeuff and Buffetaut, 1991)
Diagnosis- (after Le Loeuff and Buffetaut, 1991) very cavernous internal structure of vertebrae; hyposphene-hypantrum articulations present; dorsal transverse processes very wide anteroposteriorly; dorsal infradiapophyseal laminae diverge beneath diapophyses; femoral neck particularly straight anteroposteriorly; femoral head directed anteromedially; limited dorsal projection of anterior trochanter.
Comments- Though initially assigned to Abelisauridae by Le Loeuff and Buffetaut (1991), it has more recently been assigned merely to Abelisauria (as Abelisauroidea- Carrano and Sampson, 2008). However, Tortosa et al. (2014) recovered it as closer to abelisaurids than noasaurids, and the improved version of that study done by Filippi et al. (2016) further resolved it as outside the Rahiolisaurus+Abelisaurus subclade of brachyrostrans.
References- Le Loeuff and Buffetaut, 1991. Tarascosaurus salluvicus nov. gen., nov. sp., theropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of southern France. Géobios - Paléontologie, Stratigraphie, Paléoécologie. 24, 585-594.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The Phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.
Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016. A new brachyrostran with hypertrophied axial structures reveals an unexpected radiation of latest Cretaceous abelisaurids. Cretaceous Research. 61, 209-219.

unnamed abelisaurian (Janensch, 1925)
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Material- (MB R 3621; = 68 of Janensch) femur (773 mm)
....(MB R 3626; = 69 of Janensch) tibia (~610 mm)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Material- (MB R 3725; = 37 of Janensch) tibia (567 mm)
Comments- Janensch (1925) stated these were similar to Ceratosaurus and thought they might be referrable to C. roechlingi, but Rauhut (2011) notes they are more similar to abelisaurids.
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.

unnamed Abelisauria (Huene and Matley, 1933)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Material- (AMNH 1733) premaxilla (Chatterjee, 1978)
(AMNH 1753) premaxilla, maxilla (Chatterjee, 1978)
(AMNH 1955) maxilla (Chatterjee, 1978)
(AMNH 1958) distal caudal vertebra (Chatterjee, 1978)
(AMNH 1960) anterior dentary tip (Chatterjee, 1978)
(AMNH 1960) proximal caudal neural arch (AMNH online)
(AMNH coll.) partial frontal, partial dentary (Dalman and Gishlick, 2011)
(GSI K19/579) tibia (600 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K 19/581) tibia (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/529; incorrectly labeled 527) dentary (260 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/532) distal caudal vertebra (110 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/538; incorrectly labeled 548) incomplete maxilla (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/539) metatarsal IV (250 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/544; incorrectly labeled 538) fragmentary maxilla (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/548) incomplete maxilla (~340 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/550) dentary (260 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/558; lost) femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/568; lost) tibia (540 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/570; lost) incomplete femur (~600 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/571) three sacral centra (centrum 70 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/575) squamosal fragment (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/577) jugal fragment (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/580) partial jugal (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/594) distal caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/595; syntype of Coeluroides largus) proximal caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/596) caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/618; lost ) distal femur (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/653) pedal phalanx III-2
(GSI K27/654) pedal phalanx II-1 (80 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/658) metatarsal III (254 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/705) distal caudal vertebra (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/709) dentary (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(GSI K27/710) premaxilla (80 mm) (Huene and Matley, 1933)
(ISI R 163) lacrimal, jugal, posterior dentary, angular (Chatterjee and Rudra, 1996)
six teeth (Mather and Srivastava, 1987)
Comments- Cranial elements showing external sculpturing, caudal vertebrae resembling Majungasaurus, and robust hindlimb elements are here referred to Abelisauria closer to abelisaurids than noasaurids. Jugal GSI K27/580 is distinct from GSI K27/577 in the large posterior notch in the ascending process (shared with Carnotaurus) and different pattern of rugosities. Sacral vertebrae GSI K27/571 resemble Carnotaurus by having transversely narrow centra with only slight intercentral expansion. Proximal caudal neural arch AMNH 1960 resembles Majungasaurus more than Aucasaurus or Carnotaurus in the laterally oriented transverse processes. It differs from Aucasaurus and Carnotaurus in the lack of hyposphene-hypantrum articulations. AMNH 1958, GSI K27/532, 589 (though note Carrano et al., 2011 listed it as noasaurid), 594, 596 and 705 have low ridgelike transverse processes and short rounded prezygopophyses, unlike noasaurids, but like Majungasaurus, Ornithomimoides, O? barasimlensis and Dryptosauroides. This material is likely referrable to Rajasaurus, Indosuchus and/or indeterminate Lameta abelisaurian taxa. Chatterjee (1978) and Chatterjee and Rudra (1996) have referred some of it to Indosuchus, but this cannot be confirmed until more material of the latter is discovered. Dalman and Gishlick (2011) reexamined the AMNH material, noting some previously unreported elements, and found that it resolves as a basal abelisaurid while Indosuchus weas carnotaurine. Mathur and Srivastava (1987) referred teeth to Majungasaurus, but these are more likely to belong to a separate taxon, as the teeth of the AMNH abelisaurid specimens strongly resemble those of Majungasaurus.
References- Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-74.
Chatterjee, 1978. Indosuchus and Indosaurus, Cretaceous carnosaurs from India. Journal of Paleontology. 52(3), 570-580.
Mathur and Srivastava, 1987. Dinosaur teeth from Lameta Group (Upper Cretaceous) of Kheda District, Gujarat. Journal of the Geological Society of India. 29, 554-566.
Chatterjee and Rudra, 1996. KT events in India: Impact, rifing, volcanism and dinosaur extinction. In Novas and Molnar (eds.). Proceedings of the Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium. Memiors of the Queensland Museum. 39(3), 489-532.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Dalman and Gishlick, 2011. Theropod material from Lameta, India, in the collection of the American Museum of Natural History and its bearing on the diagnosis and phylogenetic and taxonomic status of Indosuchus raptorius. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 95.

unnamed Abelisauria (Langston, 1953)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Ortega, Columbia
Material
- (UCMP 39649a) two incomplete lateral teeth
Comments- Initially identified as carnosaurian (Langston, 1953), these were described as abelisaurid by Ezcurra (2009).
References- Langston, 1953. Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrates from Colombia, South America. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America. 64, 1519.
Ezcurra, 2009. Theropod remains from the latest Cretaceous of Colombia and their implications on the palaeozoogeography of western Gondwana. Cretaceous Research. 30, 1339-1344.

unnamed Abelisauria (Salinas, Marshall and Sepulveda, 1991)
Santonian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Vinita Formation, Chile
Material
- (SGO.PV.329c) two incomplete teeth
Comments- These were identified as coelurosaurian by Salinas et al. (1991), but Soto-Acuna et al. (2015) reidentified them as abelisaurid.
References- Salinas, Marshall and Sepulveda, 1991. Vertebrados continentales del Paleozoico y Mesozoico de Chile. Actas del VI Congreso Geológico Chileno. 310-313.
Rubilar-Rogers, 2003. Registro de dinosaurios en Chile. Boletín Museo Nacional de Historia Natural. 52, 137-150.
Rubilar-Rogers, Otero, Yury-Yanez, Vargas and Gutstein, 2012. An overview of the dinosaur fossil record from Chile. Journal of South American Earth Sciences. 37, 242-255.
Soto-Acuna, Otero, Rubilar-Rogers and Vargas, 2015. Arcosaurios no avianos de Chile. Publicacion Ocasional del Museo Nacional de Historia Natural, Chile. 63, 209-263.

unnamed Abelisauria (Dalla Vecchia, 1995)
Hauterivian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Cabao Formation, Libya
Material
- (MPCM 13693) tooth (27.5x16.2x9.8 mm) (Dalla Vecchia, 1995)
(PRC.NF.1.21) (~7-9 m) incomplete posterior dorsal vertebra, proximal caudal centrum, proximal caudal neural arch fragment, distal femur (~800-1000 mm), partial tibia (Smith, Tshakreen, Rasmussen and Lamanna, 2006; described in Smith, Lamanna, Askar, Bergig, Tshakreen, Abugares and Rasmussen, 2010)
Comments- Dalla Vecchia (1995) described a theropod tooth supposedly from the Chicla Sandstone Formation (also called the Kiklah Formation), but which is probably from a Cabao Formation (Le Loeuff et al., 2010). This was described in detail and found to be abelisaurid by Smith and Dalla Vecchia (2006), grouping with Lameta material.
Smith et al. (2006) first suggested PRC.NF.1.21 "possesses femoral and tibial characters very similar to Masiakasaurus and is thus perhaps a large-bodied noasaurid", but once described in 2010 they said it "may be referable to Abelisauridae because the poorly differentiated lateral tibial condyle is located at the same proximodistal level as is the medial condyle." Smith et al. (2010) noted the proximally bifurcate fibular crest is distinctive, but did not name a new taxon.
References- Dalla Vecchia, 1995. Second record of a site with dinosaur skeletal remains in Libya (northern Africa). Natura Nascosta. 11, 16-19.
Smith and Dalla Vecchia, 2006. An abelisaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) tooth from the Lower Cretaceous Chicla formation of Libya. Journal of African Earth Sciences. 46, 240-244.
Smith, Tshakreen, Rasmussen and Lamanna, 2006. New dinosaur discoveries from the Early Cretaceous of Libya. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 126A.
Smith and Lamanna, 2009. Abelisauroid dinosaurs from the Early Cretaceous of Libya. Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs. 41, 242.
Le Loeuff, Métais, Dutheil, Rubinos, Buffetaut, Ois Lafont, Cavin, Moreau, Tong, Blanpied and Sbeta, 2010. An Early Cretaceous vertebrate assemblage from the Cabao Formation of NW Libya. Geological Magazine. 147(5), 750-759.
Smith, Lamanna, Askar, Bergig, Tshakreen, Abugares and Rasmussen, 2010. A large abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Libya. Journal of Paleontology. 84(5), 927-934.

unnamed abelisaurian (Bertini, 1996)
Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Adamantina Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Material- (DGM 927-R) partial ilium (Brum, Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2016)
(MCT 1857-R) distal femur (~504 mm) (Brum, Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2016)
(URC 44-R) premaxilla, tooth (Bertini, 1996)
References- Bertini, 1996. Evidencias de Abelisauridae (Carnosauria: Saurischia) do Neocreta´ceo da Bacia do Parana. Boletim do 4o Simposio sobre o Cretáceo do Brasil. 267-271.
Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006. Tetrapods from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian-Maastrichtian) Bauru Group of Brazil: A reappraisal. Cretaceous Research. 27, 923-946.
Candeiro, 2014. Descripcion de los caracteres de un premaxilar (Theropoda, Abelisauridae) de la formacion Adamantina (Grupo Bauru), Sao Paulo, Brasil. Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontologia de Vertebrados. Ameghiniana. 51(6) suplemento, 6-7.
Brum, Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2016. Morphology and internal structure of two new abelisaurid remains (Theropoda, Dinosauria) from the Adamantina Formation (Turonian-Maastrichtian), Bauru Group, Paraná Basin, Brazil. Cretaceous Research. 60, 287-296.

unnamed abelisaurian (Lamanna, Martinez and Smith, 2002)
Mid Cenomanian-Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Lower Bajo Barreal Formation, Chubut, Argentina
Material
- (UNPSJB-PV247) (~8-10 m) maxilla
Comments- This specimen resembles Rugops very closely in the distribution of external grooves and pits, elevated dental lamina, and fine striae on the latter (Sereno et al., 2004). It may be referrable to Xenotarsosaurus, from the same formation, though the latter was smaller and seemingly an adult.
References- Martinez, Maure, Oliva and Luna, 1993. Un maxilar de Theropoda (Abelisauria) de la Formacion Bajo Barreal, Cretacico Tardio, Chubut, Argentina. Ameghiniana. 30(1), 109-110.
Lamanna, Martinez and Smith, 2002. A definitive abelisaurid theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(1), 58-69.
Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B. 271(1546), 1325-1330.

unnamed abelisaurian (Novas and Bandyopadhyay, 2001)
Cenomanian-Early Coniacian, Late Cretaceous
Rio Limay Subgroup, Neuquen?, Argentina

Material- (MCA 56) cranial elements, distal caudal vertebrae, hindlimb elements, pedal unguals IV (65 mm)
Description- This has cranial sculpturing.
Reference- Novas and Bandyopadhyay, 2001. Abelisaurid pedal unguals from the Late Cretaceous of India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, Asociacion Paleontologica Argentina, Publicacion Especial 7. 145-149.

unnamed abelisaurian (Martinez, Novas and Ambrosio, 2004)
Mid Cenomanian-Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Lower Bajo Barreal Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material-(MPM-99) incomplete tenth cervical vertebra, incomplete first dorsal vertebra, mid dorsal centrum, ~eighth caudal vertebra, two mid caudal vertebrae
Comments- Martinez et al. (2004) describe this as an abelisaurid that differs from both Carnotaurus and Majungasaurus but is more similar to the former. Comparisons with Xenotarsosaurus from the same formation are limited to the poorly preserved second dorsal of the latter, which differs in minor ways that may be due to positional variation.
Reference- Martinez, Novas and Ambrosio, 2004. Abelisaurid remains (Theropoda, Ceratosauria) from Southern Patagonia. Ameghiniana. 41(4), 577-585.

unnamed Abelisauria (Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kem Kem beds, Morocco
Material
- (GZG.V.19996) tooth (19x9.8x4.8 mm) (Richter, Mudroch and Buckley, 2013)
(GZG.V.19999) tooth (14.1x5.6x3.6 mm) (Richter, Mudroch and Buckley, 2013)
(MPUR NS 153/01) partial maxilla (Porchetti et al., 2011)
(MPUR NS 153/02) partial maxilla (Porchetti et al., 2011)
(NMB-1672-R) tooth (21x9x4.5 mm) (Richter, Mudroch and Buckley, 2013)
(OLPH 025) (~1.85 tons) proximal femur (~770-920 mm) (Chiarenza and Cau, 2016)
(UCPC 10) partial maxilla (Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004; described by Mahler, 2005)
References- Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link Southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B. 271(1546), 1325-1330.
Mahler, 2005. Record of Abelisauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Cenomanian of Morocco. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(1), 236-239.
Porchetti, Nicosia, Biava and Maganuco, 2011. New abelisaurid material from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco. Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia. 117(3), 463-472.
Richter, Mudroch and Buckley, 2013. Isolated theropod teeth from the Kem Kem Beds (Early Cenomanian) near Taouz, Morocco. Palaontologische Zeitschrift. 87, 291-309.
Chiarenza and Cau, 2016. A large abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Morocco and comments on the Cenomanian theropods from North Africa. PeerJ. 4:e1754.

unnamed abelisaurian (Buffetaut, Escuillie and Pohl, 2005)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Couche 3, Morocco
Material
- (WDC-CCPM-005) lateral tooth (37x20x10 mm)
Reference- Buffetaut, Escuillie and Pohl, 2005. First theropod dinosaur from the Maastrichtian phosphates of Morocco. Kaupia. 14, 3-8.

unnamed Abelisauridae (Porfiri and Calvo, 2006)
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Bajo de la Carpa Formation of the Rio Colorado Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Material- (MAU-Pv-N-496/6) tooth (?x5.5x2.2 mm) (Filippi, Martinelli and Carrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-N-498) tooth (21.9x9.6x4.3 mm) (Filippi, Martinelli and Carrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-N-505) tooth (?x8.6x4.7 mm) (Filippi, Martinelli and Carrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-N-507) tooth (?x?x3.3 mm) (Filippi, Martinelli and Carrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-N-508) tooth (?x7.2x3.5 mm) (Filippi, Martinelli and Carrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-N-512) tooth (?x8.9x4.3 mm) (Filippi, Martinelli and Carrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-LI-547) sacrum, furcula, incomplete pelvis (Mendez, Filippi and Garrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-LI-549) dorsal centrum (Mendez, Filippi and Garrido, 2015)
(MAU-Pv-LI-550) dorsal centrum (Mendez, Filippi and Garrido, 2015)
(MUCPv 1125) six sacral vertebrae, pelvises (Porfiri and Calvo, 2006)
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Bajo de la Carpa Formation of the Rio Colorado Subgroup, Rio Negro, Argentina

(MACN-PV-RN 1012) incomplete ~fifth caudal vertebra (Ezcurra and Mendez, 2009)
Comments- Porfiri and Calvo (2006) briefly described a pelvis as a carnotaurine based on- elongated and low ilium with straight dorsal border; acute ventral notch on preacetabular process; posterior border of postacetabular process with marked concavity. Yet their concept of Carnotaurinae differs from that used here in including Genusaurus, Majungasaurus and Rajasaurus. Ezcurra and Mendez (2009) described a caudal which they referred to Carnotaurinae based on a character shared with Carnotaurus and Aucasaurus- transverse processes oriented at angle of 45° or more with regard to horizontal axis of the caudal. Filippi et al. (2015) described several teeth as Abelisauroidea indet..
References- Porfiri and Calvo, 2006. A new record of Carnotaurinae (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Neuquen, Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 111A-112A.
Ezcurra and Mendez, 2009. First report of a derived abelisaurid theropod from the Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous), Patagonia, Argentina. Bulletin of Geosciences. 84(3), 547-554.
Filippi, Martinelli and Garrido, 2015. Una nueva asociación de dientes vertebrados para la Formación Bajo de la Carpa (Santoniense, Cretácico Superior) en Rincón de los Sauces, Neuquén, Argentina. Revista Española de Paleontología. 30(2), 223-238.
Mendez, Filippi and Garrido, 2015. Nuevos hallazgos de dinosaurios teropodos provenientes del sitto la invernada (Formacion Fajo de la Carpa), Rincon de los Sauces, Neuquen. XXIX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontología de Vertebrados, resumenes. Ameghiniana. 52(4) suplemento, 28-29.

undescribed abelisaurian (Sertich, Manthi, Sampson, Loewen and Getty, 2006)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lapurr sandstone (= Turkana Grits), Kenya
Material
- (~11-12 m) multiple specimens including cranial material (including a partial skull, premaxilla, postorbital and braincase), axial material and appendicular material (including astragalocalcaneum)
Comments- This is based on unassociated material referred to one taxon "based on morphological consistency and on the recovery of specimens from a narrow stratigraphic and geographic area."
References- Sertich, Manthi, Sampson, Loewen and Getty, 2006. Rift Valley dinosaurs: A new Late Cretaceous vertebrate fauna from Kenya. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 124A.
Sertich, Seiffert and Manthi, 2013. A giant abelisaurid theropod from the Latest Cretaceous of Northern Turkana, Kenya. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2013, 211.

undescribed abelisaurian (Sertich, Manthi, Sampson, Loewen and Getty, 2006)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lapurr sandstone (= Turkana Grits), Kenya
Material
- teeth and appendicular elements
Comments- Sertich et al. (2006) noted two abelisaurids are present in the formation, this large one and another giant one.
Reference- Sertich, Manthi, Sampson, Loewen and Getty, 2006. Rift Valley dinosaurs: A new Late Cretaceous vertebrate fauna from Kenya. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 124A.

undescribed Abelisauria (Novas, Carvalho, Ribeiro and Mendez, 2008)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Marilia Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Material- (CPP 174) (~3-4 m) distal femur (~570 mm) (Novas, Carvalho, Ribeiro and Mendez, 2008)
?(CPP 692) pedal phalanx III-2 (60 mm) (Novas, Carvalho, Ribeiro and Mendez, 2008)
(CPP 893) (~4-5 m) incomplete ~fifth vertebra (80 mm) (Novas, Carvalho, Ribeiro and Mendez, 2008)
(MCT 1783-R) tibia (Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2011)
(MPMA 27-0001-02) partial ilium fused to pubic fragment and incomplete ischia (Mendez et al., 2014)
References- Novas, Carvalho, Ribeiro and Mendez, 2008. First abelisaurid bone remains from the Maastrichtian Marília Formation, Bauru Basin, Brazil. Cretaceous Research. 29(4), 625-635.
Machado, Campos and Kellner, 2011. A new abelisaurid tibia from the Late Cretaceous of Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 149.
Mendez, Novas and Iori, 2014. New record of abelisauroid theropods from the Bauru Group (Upper Cretaceous), Sao Paulo state, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia. 17(1), 23-32.

undescribed Abelisauridae (Goswami, Prasad, Benson, Verma and Flynn, 2012)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Kallamedu Formation, India
Material
- teeth
Reference- Goswami, Prasad, Benson, Verma and Flynn, 2012. New vertebrates from the Late Cretaceous Kallamedu Formation, Cauvery Basin, South India, including a troodontid dinosaur, a gondwanatherian mammal, and a Simosuchus-like notosuchian crocodyliform. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 102.

undescribed abelisaurian (Lamanna, Casal and Martinez, 2012)
Mid Cenomanian-Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Lower Bajo Barreal Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- (UNPSJB-PV 1003) posterior skull, dentaries, teeth, two dorsal ribs, partial sacrum, twenty-three caudal vertebrae, fiveteen chevrons, scapula, tarsus, incomplete pes including metatarsal III
Diagnosis- (after Lamanna et al., 2012) rounded prominence bordered posteriorly by mediolaterally-oriented groove on posterolateral part of dorsal surface of frontal; low, acute posteromedial tuberosity on dorsal surface of frontal bordering posterior median fossa; proximal caudal transverse processes abruptly expand proximodistally well medial to their lateral extremes.
Comments- Lamanna et al. (2012) referred this to basal Abelisauridae based on- minimal cranial ornamentation; fenestra between lacrimal, postorbital and frontal; dorsoventrally thin frontal; lack of awl-like, proximally-directed projection at lateral end of proximal caudal transverse process; mediolaterally slender metatarsal III. They note it cannot be compared to the contemporaneous Xenotarsosaurus, but that the first caudal vertebra does differ from MPM-99 from that formation.
Reference- Lamanna, Casal and Martinez, 2012. A new abelisaurid (Theropoda: Ceratosauria) skeleton from the Upper Cretaceous Bajo Barreal Formation of Chubut Province, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 124.

undescribed abelisaurid (Canale, Carballido, Otero, Canudo and Garrido, 2014)
Albian-Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Bayo Overo Member of the Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- tooth
Reference- Canale, Carballido, Otero, Canudo and Garrido, 2014. Carcharodontosaurid teeth associated with titanosaur carcasses from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) of the Chubut Group, Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina. Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontologia de Vertebrados. Ameghiniana. 51(6) suplemento, 6.

undescribed Abelisauria (Gallina, Apesteguia, Haluza and Canale, 2014)
Late Berriasian-Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Bajada Colorada Formation, Neuquen, Argentina
Material
- (MMCh-PV-66) (~7-8 m) tibia
(MMCH-PV-68-1) tooth
Reference- Canale, Apesteguia, Gallina, Haluza, Gianechini and Pazo, 2014. Theropod remains from the Bajada Colorada Formation (Berriasian-Valanginian) from Neuquen Province, Argentina. Reunion de Comunicaciones de la Asociacion Paleontologica Argentina, abstracts. Ameghiniana. 52(1) suplemento, 5.

unnamed abelisaurian (Fanti, Cau, Martinelli and Contessi, 2014)
Late Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Chenini or Oum Ed Diab Member of the Chenini Formation, Tunisia
Material
- (MGGC 21889) dentary fragment
(MGGCTUN coll.; Morphotype 6) nine teeth (16-35 mm) [check Fanti et al. for details]
(MGGCTUN coll.; Morphotype 8) (juvenile?) four lateral teeth (13-20 mm) [check Fanti et al. for details]
(ONM TM 02) dentary fragment
Reference- Fanti, Cau, Martinelli and Contessi, 2014. Integrating palaeoecology and morphology in theropod diversity estimation: A case from the Aptian-Albian of Tunisia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 410, 39-57.

unnamed abelisaurian (Mendez, Novas and Iori, 2014)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Sao Jose do Rio Preto Formation, Brazil
Material
- (MPMA 08-0069-13) fibula (400 mm)
Reference- Mendez, Novas and Iori, 2014. New record of abelisauroid theropods from the Bauru Group (Upper Cretaceous), Sao Paulo state, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia. 17(1), 23-32.

undescribed abelisaurian (Fuentes, 2015)
Cenomanian-Early Coniacian, Late Cretaceous
Rio Neuquen Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Material- (Museo Municipal "Argentino Urquiza" coll.) cranial elements, vertebrae, cervical ribs, dorsal ribs, appendicular elements
Reference- Fuentes, 2015. Trabajos de limpieza y consolidacion de un Abelisauridae procedente de Rincon de los Sauces, Neuquen. XXIX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontología de Vertebrados, resumenes. Ameghiniana. 52(4) suplemento, 18.

undescribed abelisaurian (Gasparini, Sterli, Parras, O'Gorman, Salgado, Varela and Pol, 2015)
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
La Colonia Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- (MPEF-PV 10826) specimen including maxilla, nasal, postorbital, metatarsals including III, pedal phalanges, pedal unguals
Comments- Gasparini et al. (2015) referred this to Abelisauridae based on- maxillary and nasal ornamentation; pedal ungual with lateral groove bifurcated proximally; ventral side of pedal ungual with very conspicuous circular depression. They distinguished it from the contemporaneous Carnotaurus based on- ornamentation is slight elongated grooves; dorsal surface of postorbital anteroposteriorly elongated and less curved.
Reference- Gasparini, Sterli, Parras, O'Gorman, Salgado, Varela and Pol, 2015. Late Cretaceous reptilian biota of the La Colonia Formation, central Patagonia, Argentina: Occurrences, preservation and paleoenvironments. Cretaceous Research. 54, 154-168.

unnamed abelisaurian (Gianechini, Apesteguia, Landini, Finotti, Valieri and Zandonai, 2015)
Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Anacleto Formation of Rio Colorado Subgroup, Rio Negro, Argentina

Material- (MPCN-PV 69) (~3-5 m) (subadult or adult) incomplete premaxilla, three partial ?dorsal vertebrae, five partial fused sacral centra, proximal humeri (~250 mm), distal pubis, incomplete pedal ungual, fragments
Reference- Gianechini, Apesteguia, Landini, Finotti, Valieri and Zandonai, 2015. New abelisaurid remains from the Anacleto Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Patagonia, Argentina. Cretaceous Research. 54, 1-16.

Kryptops Sereno and Brusatte, 2008
K. palaios Sereno and Brusatte, 2008
Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation, Niger
Holotype-
(MNN GAD1; in part) incomplete maxilla (~250 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Sereno and Brusatte, 2008) a deep secondary wall in the anteroventral corner of the antorbital fossa that completely obscures the antorbital fossa and that has a scalloped and fluted dorsal margin; external texture on the maxilla, which is composed of short linear grooves.
Comments- This was mentioned by Sereno et al. (2004) as an undescribed abelisaurid from Gadoufaoua. It was later described in detail and named by Sereno and Brusatte (2008). Carrano et al. (2012) noticed the postcrania (MNN GAD1; in part- three dorsals, two ribs, sacrum and pelves) was incongruous for an abelisaurid, found in situ 15 meters away from the maxilla, and suggested it was carcharodontosaurid instead. While traditionally a basal abelisaurid sensu lato, in Farke and Sertich's (2013) analysis it cannot be placed more exactly than the Rugops+Abelisauridae clade using only the maxilla.
References- Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings: Biological Sciences. 71(1546), 1325-1330.
Brusatte and Sereno, 2006. Basal abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods from the Elrhaz Formation (Aptian-Albian) of Niger. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 46A.
Sereno and Brusatte, 2008. Basal abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods from the Lower Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation of Niger. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 53(1), 15-46.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.
Farke and Sertich, 2013. An abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Turonian of Madagascar. PLoS ONE. 8(4), e62047.

undescribed basal abelisaurian (Canale, Haluza and Novas, 2015)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Candelaros Formation of Rio Limay Group, Neuquen, Argentina

Material- (MMCh-PV 69) (14 year old adult, ~4 m, ~240 kg) incomplete frontal, two dorsal rib fragments, two fused sacral centra, incomplete pelvis, partial femur, distal metatarsal II, incomplete metatarsal III
Comments- Canale et al. (2016) added the specimen to a version of Carrano and Sampson's ceratosaur matrix and found it to be sister to Abelisauridae, more closely related than Rugops.
References- Canale, Haluza and Novas, 2015. Histologia osea de un nuevo ejempar de Abelisauridae (Dinosauria, Theropoda) del Cenomaniano de la Provincia de Neuquen, Argentina. XXIX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontología de Vertebrados, resumenes. Ameghiniana. 52(4) suplemento, 10.
Canale, Cerda, Novas and Haluza, 2016. Small-sized abelisaurid (Theropoda: Ceratosauria) remains from the Upper Cretaceous of northwest Patagonia, Argentina. Cretaceous Research. 62, 18-28.

Rugops Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004
R. primus Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Echkar Formation, Niger

Holotype- (MNN IGU1) partial skull including premaxilla, incomplete maxilla, nasal, lacrimal, prefrontal, frontal, parietal, prootic and teeth
Diagnosis- (after Sereno et al., 2004) small fenestra in the skull roof between the prefrontal, frontal, postorbital and lacrimal; row of seven small invaginated depressions on the dorsal surface of each nasal.
Comments- This taxon is placed basal to abelisaurids by Sereno et al. (2004). It is very similar to an unnamed maxilla (UNPSJB-PV247) described by Lamanna et al. (2002) from the Bajo Barreal Formation of Argentina. The nasal fossae are intruded by vascular grooves, and may have served as a base for sensory or display structures.
References- Lamanna, Martinez and Smith, 2002. A definitive abelisaurid theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(1), 58-69.
Sereno, Conrad and Wilson, 2002. Abelisaurid theropods from Africa: Phylogenetic and biogeographic implications. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 106A.
Sereno, Wilson and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings: Biological Sciences. 271(1546), 1325-1330.

Abelisauridae Bonaparte and Novas, 1985
Definition- (Abelisaurus comahuensis + Carnotaurus sastrei + Indosaurus matleyi + Indosuchus raptorius + Majungasaurus crenatissimus + Xenotarsosaurus bonapartei) (Novas, 1997)
Other definitions- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Elaphrosaurus bambergi) (modified from Rowe et al., 1997)
(Abelisaurus comahuensis + Carnotaurus sastrei) (Tykoski and Rowe, 2004; modified from Sereno, 1998)
(Carnotaurus sastrei <- Noasaurus leali) (Wilson et al., 2003)
(Carnotaurus sastrei <- Coelophysis bauri, Noasaurus leali, Passer domesticus) (Sereno, in press)
Diagnosis- (after Carrano et al., 2002) long axis of postorbital slanted anteroventrally/posterodorsally; frontals fused to parietals; quadratojugal fused to quadrate; interdental plates striated medially.
Comments- For the same reason noted above for Noasauridae, the inclusion of Coelophysis and Passer as specifiers seems useless in Sereno's (in press) redefinition. Abelisaurus comahuensis should be the internal specifier (Phylocode 11.8), so I don't accept this definition. If Abelisaurus is a carcharodontosaurid, a possibility suggested by Lamanna et al. (2002), it would leave Abelisauridae without Abelisaurus.
References- Thompson, 2011. Comparative analysis of abelisaurid skulls indicates dietary specialization. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 204.
Burch, 2013. The myological consequences of extreme limb reduction: New insights from the forelimb musculature of abelisaurid theropods. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2013, 97.

unnamed Abelisauridae (Hendrickx and Mateus, 2014)
Late Kimmeridgian-Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Lourinha Formation, Portugal
Material
- (ML 327) lateral tooth (31.8x20.1x10.7 mm)
(ML 966) lateral tooth (46.4x23.7x13 mm)
Reference- Hendrickx and Mateus, 2014. Abelisauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal and dentition-based phylogeny as a contribution for the identification of isolated theropod teeth. Zootaxa. 3759(1), 1-74.

Majungasaurinae Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014
Definition- (Majungasaurus crenatissimus <- Carnotaurus sastrei) (after Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014)
= "Rajasaurinae" Malkani, 2010
= "Majungasaurinae" Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2013 online
Comments-
Malkani (2010) proposed Rajasaurinae for Rajasaurus, apparently within his new invalid family "Vitakrisauridae." However, it was not given a diagnosis (ICZN Article 13.1.1) or explicitly stated to be new (ICZN 16.1), so is a nomen nudum. It could be used for the Rajasaurus+Majungasaurus+Indosaurus clade that appears in some recent analyses. Tortosa et al. (2014) also found this group, and proposed to name it Majungasaurinae.
References- Malkani, 2010. New Pakisaurus (Pakisauridae, Titanosauria, Sauropoda) remains, and Cretaceous Tertiary (K-T) boundary from Pakistan. Sindh University Research Journal (Science Series). 42(1), 39-64.
Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.

Arcovenator Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014
= "Arcovenator" Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2013 online
A. escotae Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014
= "Arcovenator escotae" Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2013 online
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Lower Argiles Rutilantes Formation, Var, France
Holotype
- (MHNA-PV-2011.12.1) postorbital, braincase
....(MHNA-PV-2011.12.2) squamosal
....(MHNA-PV-2011.12.3) tibia (510 mm)
....(MHNA-PV-2011.12.4) fibula (490 mm)
....(MHNA-PV-2011.12.5) proximal caudal vertebra
....(MHNA-PV-2011.12.15) tooth
Paratypes- (MHNA-PV-2011.12.20) tooth
(MHNA-PV-2011.12.187) tooth
(MHNA-PV-2011.12.198) proximal caudal vertebra
(MHNA-PV-2011.12.213) proximal caudal vertebra
(MHNA-PV-2011.12.297) tooth
Diagnosis- (after Tortosa et al., in press) frontals with slight median thickening; median dorsal foramen between frontals; low depression with small fenestra in skull roof between frontal, postorbital and lacrimal; postorbital forming strong, rugose, dorsolaterally developed supraorbital brow; thin bony expansion between ventral and posterior rami of postorbital; lateral tuberosity on ventral ramus of postorbital; paroccipital processes bounded dorsally and ventrally by two horizontal bars, forming depression lateral to foramen magnum; basipterygoid process laterally directed; slightly proximally anterodorsally curved fibular crest; lateral tibial condyle more developed posteriorly than medial condyle.
Comments- The type materials were discovered in 2011 and described by Tortosa et al. (2014) as a new taxon of abelisaurid. Their phylogenetic analysis is shown as recovering "Arcovenator" in a clade with Majungasaurus, Indosaurus, Rajasaurus and Rahiolisaurus which they name "Majungasaurinae", yet the matrix is misprinted and when fixed actually finds the new genus as a "majungasaurine" or a basal abelisaurid. Although electronic publication of names was allowed by the ICZN in 2013, Tortosa et al. did not register their name with Zoobank (ICZN 8.5.3), making it unofficial until physical published in 2014.
Reference- Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.

unnamed majungasaurine (Allain and Pereda Suberbiola, 2003)
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Begudian beds, Bouches-du-Rhone, France
Material
- (La Boucharde taxon) tibia (~400 mm)
Comments- Assigned to Neoceratosauria indet. by Allain and Suberbiola (2003), this was identified as abelisaurid by Carrano and Sampson (2008), which was confirmed in the ceratosaur analysis of Tortosa et al. (2014). Most recently, Filippi et al. (2016) used a version of that matrix to recover it as a majungasaurine sister to Arcovenator.
References- Allain and Pereda Suberbiola, 2003. Dinosaurs of France. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2, 27-44.
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The Phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.
Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.
Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016. A new brachyrostran with hypertrophied axial structures reveals an unexpected radiation of latest Cretaceous abelisaurids. Cretaceous Research. 61, 209-219.

Genusaurus Accarie, Beaudoin, Dejax, Fries, Michard and Taquet, 1995
G. sisteronis Accarie, Beaudoin, Dejax, Fries, Michard and Taquet, 1995
Middle Albian, Early Cretaceous
Bevons Beds, France

Holotype- (MNHN, Bev.1) (3.16 m) seven dorsal centra, sacral centrum, incomplete ilium, proximal pubis, femur (380 mm), proximal tibia, proximal fibula, tarsal
Comments- This has been recently recovered as both a noasaurid and an abelisaurid.
Reference- Accarie, Beaudoin, Dejax, Fries, Michard and Taquet, 1995. Découverte d'un Dinosaure théropode nouveau (Genusaurus sisteronis n. g., n. sp.) dans l'Albien marin de Sisteron (Alpes de Haute-Provence, France) et extension au Crétacé inférieur de la lignée cératosaurienne. Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences à Paris, série IIa. 320, 327-344.

Indosaurus Huene, 1931 vide Huene, 1932
I. matleyi Huene, 1931 vide Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Holotype- (GSI K27/565) frontals, parietals, braincase
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2004) Provisionally indeterminate relative to Indosuchus raptorius (pending publication of Dalman and Gishlick's 2011 analysis).
Comments- Though traditionally thought to be more Allosaurus- or Carnotaurus-like than the tyrannosaurid- or Abelisaurus-like Indosuchus, Novas et al. (2004) found that poor preservation made the two taxa impossible to distinguish. In particular, there is no evidence of frontal horns or sagittal crest shape differences. Other minor differences may be individual variation, based on the high amount observed in Majungasaurus. Dalman and Gishlick (2011) however noted in an abstract that the genera resolved in different positions in their phylogenetic analysis.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologia Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas and Bandyopaphyay, 1999. New approaches on the Cretaceous theropods from India. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, abstracts. 46-47.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Dalman and Gishlick, 2011. Theropod material from Lameta, India, in the collection of the American Museum of Natural History and its bearing on the diagnosis and phylogenetic and taxonomic status of Indosuchus raptorius. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 95.

Indosuchus Huene, 1931 vide Huene, 1932
I. raptorius Huene, 1931 vide Huene, 1932
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Lectotype- (GSI K27/685) frontals, parietals,
Paralectotypes- (GSI K20/350) (subadult?) partial lacrimals, frontals, parietals
(GSI K20/690) skull roof
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2004) frontonasal suture placed anteriorly compared to lacrimal.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the central provinces of India. Palaeontologia Indica. 21, 1-74.
Novas, Agnolin and Bandyopadhyay, 2004. Cretaceous theropods from India: A review of specimens described by Huene and Matley (1933). Revista del Museo Argentino del Ciencias Naturales. 6(1), 67-103.
Dalman and Gishlick, 2011. Theropod material from Lameta, India, in the collection of the American Museum of Natural History and its bearing on the diagnosis and phylogenetic and taxonomic status of Indosuchus raptorius. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 95.

Majungasaurus Lavocat, 1955
= Majungatholus Sues and Taquet, 1979
M. crenatissimus (Deperet, 1896) Lavocat, 1955
= Megalosaurus crenatissimus Daperet, 1896
= Majungatholus atopus Sues and Taquet, 1979
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Maevarano Formation, Madagascar

Neotype- (MNHN.MAJ 1) (subadult) incomplete dentary, two teeth (Lavocat, 1955)
Referred- ?(FSL 92.289; syntype of Megalosaurus crenatissimus) incomplete caudal vertebra (Deperet, 1896)
?(FSL 92.290; syntype of Megalosaurus crenatissimus) partial pedal ungual (Deperet, 1896)
(FSL 92.306a; syntype of Megalosaurus crenatissimus) posterior dentary tooth (Deperet, 1896)
(FSL 92.306b; syntype of Megalosaurus crenatissimus) fourth premaxillary tooth (Deperet, 1896)
?(FSL 92.343; syntype of Megalosaurus crenatissimus) sacral centrum (Deperet, 1896)
?(FSL 92.???; syntype of Megalosaurus crenatissimus) sacral centrum (Deperet, 1896)
(MNHN.MAJ 4; holotype of Majungatholus atopus) lacrimal fragment, frontals, parietals, mesethmoid, laterosphenoids (Sues and Taquet, 1979)
(MNHN 1911a-d) anterior premaxillary tooth, middle maxillary or dentary tooth, posterior maxillary or dentary tooth, posterior dentary tooth (Piveteau, 1926)
?(MNHN coll.; lost?) vertebra, limb bone fragments (Boule, 1896)
?(MNHN coll.; lost) teeth (Boule, 1900)
?(MNHN coll.; lost) tooth, vertebrae including a caudal vertebra, fragmentary limb bones (Thevenin, 1906)
?(MNHN coll.; lost) teeth, bones (Lavocat, 1955)
(UA Bv 532) pedal ungual I (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA Bv 1658) pedal ungual I (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA Bv 1260) pedal phalanx II-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA Bv 1265) pedal phalanx III-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA coll.) numerous teeth, three fragmentary femora or tibiae (Ravoavy, 1991)
Early Maastrichtian(?), Late Cretaceous
Masorobe Member of Maevarano Formation, Madagascar

Referred- teeth (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
Middle Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Anembalemba Member of Maevarano Formation, Madagascar

Referred- (FMNH PR 2008) premaxilla (72 mm) (Sampson, Krause, Dodson and Forster, 1996)
(FMNH PR 2099) (subadult) partial skull (Sampson, Witmer, Forster, Krause, O'Connor, Dodson and Ravoavy, 1998)
(FMNH PR 2100) incomplete skull (570 mm), mandibles, fifth caudal vertebra (84.9 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (95.7 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (98.1 mm), eighth caudal vertebra (98.1 mm), ninth caudal vertebra (97 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (~93.1 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (96 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (96.7 mm), thirteenth caudal vertebra (95.6 mm), fourteenth caudal vertebra (94.2 mm), fifteenth caudal vertebra (91.4 mm), sixteenth caudal vertebra (91.5 mm), seventeenth caudal vertebra (90.4 mm), eighteenth caudal vertebra (91.1 mm), nineteenth caudal vertebra (90.9 mm), twentieth caudal vertebra (88.7 mm), twenty-first caudal vertebra (86.6 mm), twenty-second caudal vertebra (83.5 mm), twenty-third caudal vertebra (81.6 mm), twenty-fourth caudal vertebra (79.2 mm), twenty-fifth caudal vertebra (79 mm), twenty-sixth caudal vertebra (76.6 mm), twenty-seventh caudal vertebra (74.6 mm), twenty-eighth caudal vertebra (70.8 mm), twenty-ninth caudal vertebra (67.5 mm), distal caudal vertebra (36.5 mm), eighteen chevrons (Sampson, Witmer, Forster, Krause, O'Connor, Dodson and Ravoavy, 1998)
....(UA 9089) four proximal caudal vertebrae (Ravoavy, 1991)
(FMNH PR 2198) (juvenile) lateral tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2226) (juvenile) anterior tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2228) (juvenile) lateral tooth (Carrano et al., 2002)
(FMNH PR 2278) (adult) premaxillae, maxillae, jugal, quadratojugal, ectopterygoid, quadrate, surangular, angular, prearticular, articular, two fragmentary cervical neural arches, three fragmentary dorsal vertebrae, one fragmentary caudal vertebra, scapulocoracoid, partial ilium, femur, tibiae (one fragmentary), fibulae (one partial; ~406 mm), astragalocalcaneum, metatarsal II (198.9 mm), phalanx II-1, metatarsal III (250 mm), metatarsal IV (207.7 mm), phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2293) axis (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2294) five caudal vertebrae, two chevrons (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2295) third cervical vertebra (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2423) humerus (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2424) tibia (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2425) astragalocalcaneum (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2426) pedal phalanx II-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2427) pedal phalanx II-2 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2428) distal pedal phalanx II-1, pedal ungual II, phalanx III-2 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2429) pedal phalanx III-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2430) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2431) pedal phalanx IV-3 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2432) pedal phalanx IV-4 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2433) pedal phalanx IV-4 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH PR 2434) pedal ungual IV (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(MSNM V3342) lateral tooth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V3360) anterolateral tooth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V3363) anterolateral tooth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V3368) anterolateral tooth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V5255) pedal phalanx III-1 (60 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V5256) pedal phalanx III-2 (36 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V5267) pedal ungual II (42 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V5276) pedal ungual IV (52 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V5368) anterior premaxillary tooth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V5509) pedal ungual IV (51 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V5510) pedal phalanx III-1 (74 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V5518) anterolateral tooth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V6418) pedal ungual III (~57 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V6419) pedal ungual I (29 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V6420) pedal ungual IV (61 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V6421) pedal ungual II (56 mm) (Maganuco et al., 2008)
(MSNM V coll.) 123 lateral teeth (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V coll.) 21 anterolateral teeth (16-35 mm) (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(MSNM V coll.) 19 anterior premaxillary teeth (15-30 mm) (Fanti and Therrien, 2007)
(UA 8678) (subadult) incomplete skull, splenial, prearticular, surangular, atlantal neurapophysis, axis (69.8 mm), third cervical vertebra (59.9 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (61.7 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (63.2 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (~65.5 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (~60.1 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (~56.1 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (57.9 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (58.4 mm), thirteen cervical ribs, first dorsal vertebra (59.3 mm), second dorsal vertebra (~51.9 mm), third dorsal vertebra (55.2 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (~51.6 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (58.9 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (59.7 mm), seventh dorsal neural arch, eighth dorsal vertebra (67.4 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (67.1 mm), tenth dorsal neural arch, eleventh dorsal vertebra (65.6 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra, thirteenth dorsal neural arch, fourteen dorsal ribs, second sacral vertebra, third sacral vertebra, fourth sacral neural arch, first caudal vertebra (71.3 mm), second caudal vertebra (69.6 mm), third caudal vertebra (70.8 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (73.2 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (75.2 mm), mid caudal vertebra, first chevron, ilia (585 mm) (Sampson, Witmer, Forster, Krause, O'Connor, Dodson and Ravoavy, 1998)
(UA 8709) incomplete skull, mandibles (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 8716) premaxilla (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 8717) premaxillae (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 8718) partial lacrimal (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 8719) partial skull roof (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 8782) distal quadrate (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9031) humerus (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9032) tibia (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9033) astragalocalcaneum (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9034) metatarsal II (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9035) metatarsal IV (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9036) pedal phalanx II-1 (88 mm) (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9037) pedal phalanx II-2 (45 mm) (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9038) pedal ungual II (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9039) pedal phalanx III-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9040) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9041) pedal phalanx IV-2 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9042) pedal phalanx III-2 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9043) pedal ungual IV (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9077) tibia, fibula (406.4 mm) (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9078) fibula (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9079) metatarsal III (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9081) pedal phalanx III-1 or III-2 (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA 9082) astragalus (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
(UA coll.) gastralia (O'Connor, 2007)
(FMNH and UA coll.) thousands of isolated teeth (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
specimen including scapulocoracoid, humerus, radius, ulna, metacarpal I, phalanx I-1, metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, metacarpal III, phalanx III-1 fused with III-2, metacarpal IV fused with phalanx IV-1 (Burch and Carrano, 2008)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Miadana Member of Maevarano Formation, Madagascar

Referred- teeth (Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007)
Late Cretaceous(?)
Madagascar
Referred- ?(MNHN.MAJ 242) premaxillary tooth (Smith, 2007)
Diagnosis- (after Krause et al., 2007) dorsoventrally deep, fused nasals that are strongly pneumatized via large, bilateral foramina; nasal processes of left and right premaxillae separated by a thin lamina of nasal; maxilla bearing 17 alveoli; frontals rounded rostrally rather than forming a double notch; frontals with a sculptured, median cornual process in adults that is variably pneumatic; pronounced median fossa on sagittal (frontoparietal) crest; dentary bearing 17 alveoli, virtually no extension caudal to last alveolus, and ventral position of lateral sulcus; teeth bearing weakly developed interdenticular sulci; long, falciform atlantal epipophysis; vertebral centra in cranial dorsal series with dorsoventrally elongate articular surfaces; cranial and caudal borders of midcervical transverse processes parallel in lateral view; dorsal and caudal vertebral neural spines dorsally expanded (transversely and craniocaudally); cervical ribs pneumatized via multiple, enlarged foramina on medial surface of shaft, and accessory foramina on cranial and caudal surfaces of capitulotubercular web.
Comments- Deperet (1986) never specified a holotype from his syntypes for Megalosaurus crenatissimus, which came from different localities. Lavocat (1955) described a dentary (MNHN.MAJ 1) he believed to be from the same species, but which he thought indicated generic difference from Megalosaurus. He designated this dentary the type specimen of Majungasaurus, making the new combination Majungasaurus crenatissimus. This was an improper procedure, as Deperet's syntypes remain the type specimens of crenatissimus regardless of which genus they are assigned to. Sampson et al. (1996) and Krause et al. (2007) claimed Lavocat implicitly designated the dentary the neotype of Majungasaurus crenatissimus, but the ICZN does not allow neotype designation without petition unless the type material is lost (Article 75). So Sampson et al.'s and Krause et al.'s use of the dentary as the type specimen for Majungasaurus crenatissimus was incorrect. Subsequently, Carrano et al. (2009) petitioned the ICZN to designate the dentary as the neotype because "the original Depret type specimens are indeed indeterminate as to genus and species", oddly citing Krause et al. who stated the two syntype teeth (FSL 92.306a-b) are identical to those in the dentary, and that Majungasaurus teeth are diagnostic among abelisaurids. The ICZN decided the case in 2011, declaring the dentary to be the neotype, despite the fact unknown to them that two of the syntypes are seemingly considered to be diagnostic by the petitioners themselves. Smith (2007) also found one of the syntype teeth to be confidently referrable to Majungasaurus.
An additional nomenclatural issue involves the holotype of Majungatholus atopus, which was originally identified as a pachycephalosaur (Sues and Taquet, 1979). Though a few authors expressed doubt at this identification (Rage, 1988; Giffen, 1989), it was not disproven until 1996 when the skull of FMNH PR 2100 was found (Sampson et al., 1998), showing a Majungatholus dome on an abelisaurid skull. Sampson et al. believed Deperet's and Lavocat's material to be undiagnostic, making the diagnostic Majungatholus specimen the holotype of the species. This also resulted in Majungatholus atopus being the valid name for this theropod from 1998 until 2007. 2007 saw the publication of an extensive monograph on the Maevarano abelisaurid (Sampson and Krause, eds.) which determined both Deperet's and Lavocat's material could be distinguished from other abelisaurids, making Majungasaurus crenatissimus the valid name after all.
Carrano et al. (2011) reidentified three supposed Masiakasaurus teeth from Carrano et al. (2002) as juvenile Majungasaurus- FMNH PR 2198, 2226 and 2228.
Several specimens from outside Madagascar have been referred to Majungasaurus, but these are all fragmentary and more likely to be other abelisaurid taxa, as dental apomorphies of Majungasaurus were only discovered in 2007. Such specimens include teeth and two unguals from Egypt (Gemmellaro, 1921), a tooth from India (Gemmerallo, 1921), teeth from the Lameta Formation of India (Mathur and Srivastava, 1987), and dentary fragments from the Gres Rouges Infracenomaniens of Morocco (Russell, 1996). The latter are carcharodontosaurid.
References- Deperet, 1896. Note on the sauropod and theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of Madagascar. Bulletin de la Societe Geologique de France, 3rd series. 24, 176.
Boule, 1896. Note préliminaire sur les débris de dinosauriens envoyés au Muséum par M. Bastard. Bulletin du Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris. 2, 347-351.
Boule, 1900. Note sur quelques fossiles de Madagascar parvenus récemment au laboratoire de Paléontologie. Bulletin du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle à Paris. 6, 201.
Thevenin, 1906. Note sur des fossils de Madagascar, recueillis par le Dr. Decorse. Bulletin du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle à Paris. 12, 334-336.
Thevenin, 1907. Dinosauriens (Paléontologie de Madagascar IV). Annales de Paléontologie. 2, 121-136.
Gemmellaro, 1921. Rettili maëstrichtiani d'Egitto: Giornale di Scienze Naturali ed Economiche. 32, 339-351.
Piveteau, 1926. Contribution à l’étude des formations lagunaires du Nord-Ouest de Madagascar. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France. (4) 26, 33-38.
Lavocat, 1955. Etude des gisements de Dinosauriens de la région de Majunga (Madagascar). Travaux du Bureau Géologique. 69, 1-19.
Lavocat, 1955. Sur une portion de mandibule de Théropode provenant du Crétacé supérieur de Madagascar. Bulletin du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle à Paris. 27, 256-259.
Lavocat, 1955. Les recherches de reptiles fossils à Madagascar. Le Naturaliste Malgache. 7(2), 203-207.
Lavocat, 1957. Sur les couches à dinosauriens de Madagascar. CCTA and Service Géologique de Madagascar, Comptes Rendus. Comités régionaux Centre, Est et Sud Conférence de Tananarive, Avril 1957, Geology, Second Volume. 363-364.
Russell, Russell, Taquet and Thomas, 1976. Nouvelles récoltes de Vertébrés dans les terrains continentaux du Crétacé supérieur de la région de Majunga (Madagascar). Comptes Rendu Sommaire Des Séances et Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France. 5, 205-208.
Sues and Taquet, 1979. A pachycephalosaurid dinosaur from Madagascar and a Laurasia-Gondwanaland connection in the Cretaceous. Nature. 279, 633-635.
Mathur and Srivastava, 1987. Dinosaur teeth from Lameta Group (Upper Cretaceous) of Kheda District, Gujarat. Journal of the Geological Society of India. 29, 554-566.
Rage, 1988. Gondwana, Tethys, and terrestrial vertebrates during the Mesozoic and Cainozoic. In Audley-Charles and Hallam (eds.). Gondwana and Tethys. Geological Society Special Publication 37. 255-273
Giffin, 1989. Pachycephalosaur paleoneurology (Archosauria: Ornithischia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 9(1), 67-77.
Ravoavy, 1991. Identification et mise en catalogue des vertébrés fossiles récoltes dans le Crétacé supérieur continental de la région de Berivotra (Majunga) fouille 1987. Université d’Antananarivo Mémoire de Recherche. Part II, 55-104.
Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18, 349-402.
Sampson, Krause, Dodson and Forster, 1996. The premaxilla of Majungasaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) with implications for Gondwanan Paleobiography. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 16(4), 601-605.
O'Connor, Suny and Sampson, 1998. The vertebral column of Majungatholus atopus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 67A.
Sampson, Witmer, Forster and Krause, 1998. The evolution and biogeography of Gondwanan theropod dinosaurs: New information from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of African Earth Sciences. Special Abstracts Issue, Gondwana 10: Event Stratigraphy of Gondwana. 27(1A), 167-168.
Sampson, Witmer, Forster, Krause, O'Connor, Dodson and Ravoavy, 1998. Predatory dinosaur remains from Madagascar: Implications for the Cretaceous biogeography of Gondwana. Science, 280, 1048-1051.
Carrano, Sampson and Forster, 2002. The osteology of Masiakasaurus knopfleri, a small abelisauroid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 510-534.
Witmer, Ridely and Sampson, 2004. The ear region, cerebral endocast, and cephalic sinuses of the abelisaurid theropod dinosaur Majungatholus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 27A.
Fanti, 2005. Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Cretaceous layers of Berivotra (Mahajanga, Madagascar): Paleobiogeographic implications. Masters thesis. University of Bologna. 375 pp.
Carrano, 2007. The appendicular skeleton of Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 164-179.
Fanti and Therrien, 2007. Theropod tooth assemblages from the Late Cretaceous Maevarano Formation and the possible presence of dromaeosaurids in Madagascar. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 52(1), 155-166.
Farke and O'Connor, 2007. Pathology in Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 180-184.
Krause, Sampson, Carrano and O'Connor, 2007. Overview of the history of discovery, taxonomy, phylogeny, and biogeography of Majungasaurus crenatissumus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) form the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 1-20.
O'Connor, 2007. The postcranial axial skeleton of Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 127-162.
Rogers, Krause, Curry Rogers, Rasoamiaramanana and Rahanarisoa, 2007. Paleoenivronment and paleoecology of Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 21-31.
Sampson and Witmer, 2007. Craniofacial anatomy of Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 32-102.
Smith, 2007. Dental morphology and variation in Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. In Sampson and Krause (eds.). Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. SVP Memoir 8, 103-126.
Burch and Carrano, 2008. Abelisaurid forelimb evolution: New evidence from Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Abelisauridae: Theropoda) from the late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 58A.
Hieronymus and Witmer, 2008. The facial skin of Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Abelisauridae: Saurischia): Pronounced dermal metaplasia as the cause of rugosity in abelisaurid skulls. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3), 90A.
Maganuco, Cau and Pasini, 2008. New information on the abelisaurid pedal elements from the Late Cretaceous of NW Madagascar (Mahajanga Basin). Atti Della Societa Italiana de Scienze Naturale Museo Civico de Storia Naturale in Milano. 149 (II), 239-252.
Carrano, Krause, O'Connor and Sampson, 2009. Case 3487 Megalosaurus crenatissimus Depéret, 1896 (currently Majungasaurus crenatissimus; Dinosauria, Theropoda): Proposed replacement of the holotype by a neotype. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 66(3), 261-264.
Carrano, Loewen and Sertich, 2011. New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleri Sampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95, 53 pp.
ICZN, 2011. Opinion 2269 (Case 3487) Megalosaurus crenatissimus Depéret, 1896 (currently Majungasaurus crenatissimus; Dinosauria, Theropoda): Designation of a neotype. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 68(1), 89-90.
Tsuihiji and O'Connor, 2012. Reconstruction of muscular and pneumatic systems in the neck and anterior trunk of Abelisauridae: Insights from Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 185.
Ratsimbaholison, O'Connor and Felice, 2013. Ontogenetic trends in the craniomandibular skeleton of Majungasaurus crenatissimus and derivation of the abelisaurid skull morphotype. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2013, 196.
Ratsimbaholison, Felice and O'Connor, 2014. Craniomandibular ontogeny in nonavian theropod dinosaurs: Insights from the abelisaurid Majungasaurus crenatissimus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2014, 211.
M? sp. indet. (Curry, 1997)
Coniacian?, Late Cretaceous
Ankazomihaboka Sandstones, Madagascar
Reference
- Curry, 1997. Vertebrate fossils from the Upper Cretaceous Ankazomihaboka Sandstones, Mahajanga Basin, Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 17(3), 40A.

Rajasaurus
Wilson, Sereno, Srivastava, Bhatt, Khosla and Sahni, 2003
= "Rajasaurus" Badam, 2003
R. narmadensis Wilson, Sereno, Srivastava, Bhatt, Khosla and Sahni, 2003
= "Rajasaurus narmadensis" Badam, 2003
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Holotype- (GSI No. 21141/1-33) (7-9 m) braincase, cervical centrum, partial dorsal vertebrae, sacrum, partial caudal vertebrae, partial scapula, partial ilia, proximal pubis, femora (one distal), distal tibia, proximal fibula, metatarsals II, metatarsal IV
Referred- (paralectotypes of Lametasaurus indicus; lost) sacrum (610 mm), ilia (960 mm), tibia (580 mm) (Matley, 1923)
(in cranial reconstruction online) premaxilla, maxilla, lacrimal, jugal, postorbital, quadratojugal, dentary, teeth
Diagnosis- (from Wilson et al., 2003) median nasofrontal prominence, with the frontals forming only the posterior rim of the prominence; anteroposteriorly elongate supertemporal fenestrae, with length approx. 150% transverse breadth of frontal; robust ilium with transversed ridge separating the brevis fossa from the acetabulum.
Comments- Collected in 1983 by Suresh Srivastava of the Geological Survey of India (GSI) and Ashok Sahni, a paleontologist at Panjab University. Matley (1923) described a sacrum, ilium, tibia and scutes as the thyreophoran Lametasaurus indicus. The postcrania were later recognized as theropod by Chakravarti (1935). The scutes may be crocodilian, sauropod or thyreophoran. Walker (1964) made them the lectotype of Lametasaurus, leaving the theropod elements without a name. Wilson et al. note they may belong to Rajasaurus.
References- Matley, 1923. Note on an armored dinosaur from the Lameta beds of Jubbulpore. Records of the Geological Survey of India. 55, 105-109.
Chakravarti, 1935. Is Lametasaurus indicus an armored dinosaur? American Journal of Science. 30(5), 138-141.
Walker, 1964. Triassic reptiles from the Elgin area: Ornithosuchus and the origin of carnosaurs. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B. 248, 53-134.
Badam, 2003. Scientists discover new carnivorous dinosaur species in India. Associated Press, 14 August.
Wilson, Sereno, Srivastava, Bhatt, Khosla and Sahni, 2003. A new abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lameta Formation (Cretaceous, Maastrichtian) of India. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology. 31(1), 1-42.

Brachyrostra Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, 2009
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Majungasaurus crenatissimus) (Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, 2009)
References- Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, 2009. New carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of NW Patagonia and the evolution of abelisaurid theropods. Naturwissenschaften. 96, 409-414.

Xenotarsosaurus Martinez, Gimenez, Rodriguez and Bochatey, 1987
X. bonapartei Martinez, Gimenez, Rodriguez and Bochatey, 1987
Cenomanian?, Late Cretaceous
Bajo Barreal Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Syntypes- (PVL 612) (4.8 m) femur (611 mm), tibia (592 mm), fibula, astragalocalcaneum (134 mm wide, 96 mm tall)
....(UNPSJB PV 184) two anterior dorsal vertebrae
References- Martínez, Gimenez, Rodríguez and Bochatey, 1986. Xenotarsosaurus bonapartei nov. gen. et sp. (Carnosauria, Abelisauridae), a new theropod from the Bajo Barreal Formation, Chubut, Argentina. Actas del Congreso Argentino de Paleontología y Bioestratigrafía. 4, 3-31.
Coria and Rodríguez, 1993. Sobre Xenotarsosaurus bonapartei Martínez, Giménez, Rodríguez, y Bochatey, 1986; un problematico Neoceratosauria (Novas, 1989) del Cretacico de Chubut. Ameghiniana. 30(3), 326-327.

Dahalokely Farke and Sertich, 2013
D. tokana Farke and Sertich, 2013
Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Ambolafaltsy Formation, Madagascar
Holotype
- (UA 9855) (~3.5 m subadult) fifth cervical vertebra (64.5 mm), first dorsal vertebra (44 mm), second dorsal vertebra (48.7 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (52.1 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (55.1 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (55.2 mm), incomplete ninth dorsal vertebra, second dorsal rib (339.9 mm), seven dorsal rib fragments
Diagnosis- (after Farke and Sertich, 2013) mid-cervical vertebrae have prezygoepipophyseal lamina with prominent convexity at midpoint nearly equal in length to centrum and prominent notches at either end separating convexity from epipophyses; prezygapophyses and centroprezygapophyseal lamina nearly vertical and linear in lateral view in dorsals 1 and 2, with cranial margin of prezygapophyses and cranial face of centrum nearly co-planar; postzygapophyses on dorsal 2 strongly concave; infraprezygapophyseal fossa divided through dorsal six.
Comments- The specimen was discovered in 2007 and announced by Farke and Sertich (2009) as an abelisaurid. It was later described by Farke and Sertich (2013), who found it to be a basal noasaurid. Only one extra step is needed for it to be a majungasaurine though, and two more for it to be a non-abelisaurian abelisauroid. The Tortosa et al. matrix recovered it as a non-furileusaurian brachyrostran.
References- Farke and Sertich, 2009. A medium-sized theropod from the Late Cretaceous (Turonian or Coniacian) of the Ambilobe Basin, Northernmost Madagascar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 94A.
Farke and Sertich, 2013. An abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Turonian of Madagascar. PLoS ONE. 8(4), e62047.

Rahiolisaurus Novas, Chaterjee, Rudra and Datta, 2010
= "Rahiolisaurus" Novas, Chaterjee, Rudra and Datta vide Mendez, Novas and Chatterjee, online 2010
R. gujaratensis Novas, Chaterjee, Rudra and Datta, 2010
= "Rahiolisaurus gujaratensis" Novas, Chaterjee, Rudra and Datta vide Mendez, Novas and Chatterjee, online 2010
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Holotype- (ISIR 550) (~8 m adult) ilium fused to proximal pubis
....(ISIR 554) incomplete pubis (~750-800 mm)
....(ISIR 557) femur (770 mm)
Paratypes- (ISIR 401) premaxilla
(ISIR 402-403)
(ISIR 404-407b) fused first to fifth sacral vertebrae
(ISIR 408-409) two mid and distal caudal vertebrae
(ISIR 410) proximal caudal vertebra
(ISIR 411-414) four mid and distal caudal vertebrae
(ISIR 415) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 416-429) fourteen mid and distal caudal vertebrae
(ISIR 430-431)
(ISIR 432) incomplete scapula
(ISIR 433)
(ISIR 435)
(ISIR 436) ilium (800 mm) fused to proximal pubis
(ISIR 437) ilium fused to proximal pubis
(ISIR 438) tibia (430 mm)
(ISIR 439) fused distal ischia
(ISIR 440) femur
(ISIR 441) femur
(ISIR 442) femur
(ISIR 443) femur
(ISIR 444) femur
(ISIR 445) tibia (600 mm)
(ISIR 446) tibia
(ISIR 447) tibiotarsus
(ISIR 449) tibia
(ISIR 450) metatarsal
(ISIR 451-454)
(ISIR 457) tibia
(ISIR 458) tibia
(ISIR 464) pubis
(ISIR 465) incomplete scapulocoracoid
(ISIR 474)
(ISIR 475) metatarsal IV
(ISIR 486-503)
(ISIR 504) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 505) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 506) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 506-507) fused first and second sacral vertebrae
(ISIR 508) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 509) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 510) posterior dorsal centrum
(ISIR 511-514) fused first to fifth sacral vertebrae
(ISIR 515) sixth cervical vertebra
(ISIR 516-517) fused fifth and sixth sacral vertebrae
(ISIR 518-545) twenty-eight mid and distal caudal vertebrae
(ISIR 546) chevron
(ISIR 547) proximal scapula
(ISIR 549) metatarsal
(ISIR 551) ilium fused to proximal pubis
(ISIR 552) pubis
(ISIR 553) pubis
(ISIR 555) fibula
(ISIR 556) femur
(ISIR 558) femur
(ISIR 559) femur
(ISIR 560) femur
(ISIR 561) femur
(ISIR 562) tibia
(ISIR 563) tibia
(ISIR 564) tibia
(ISIR 565) tibia
(ISIR 566-568)
(ISIR 569) metatarsal II
(ISIR 570) tibiotarsus
(ISIR 571) tibiotarsus
(ISIR 572)
(ISIR 573) metatarsal I(?), fused metatarsals II and III
(ISIR 574)
(ISIR 575) metatarsal
(ISIR 576) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 577) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 578) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 579) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 580)
(ISIR 581) metatarsal
(ISIR 582) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 583-584)
(ISIR 585) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 586) metatarsal
(ISIR 587) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 588) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 589) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 590) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 591) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 592) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 593) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 594) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 595) pedal phalanx
(ISIR 596-602)
(ISIR 634) ilium fused to proximal pubis
(ISIR 645) proximal scapula
(ISIR 649)
(ISIR 657) proximal humerus (~250 mm) (Mendez, Novas and Chatterjee, 2010)
(ISIR 658) axis
....(ISIR 659) third cervical vertebra
....(ISIR 660) fourth cervical vertebra
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2010) premaxillary interdental plates fused and lacking vertical ridges; dental foramina absent; premaxillary teeth with teardrop-shaped cross section; a faint mesial keel but a rounded distal edge; iliac blade with deep caudal notch on postacetabular process; metatarsal I rod-like; metatarsal II strongly narrow proximally.
Comments- Chatterjee and Rudra (1996) mentioned and schematically illustrated new abelisaurid material discovered in 1995 and 1997 which they referred to Indosuchus. Though they described it as having an unreduced forelimb, the humerus (ISIR 434) has been reassigned to Titanosauria by Novas et al. Similarly, the supposed radius (ISIR 549) is a broken metatarsal of Rahiolisaurus. Mendez et al. (2010) described a proximal humerus belonging to the taxon which is reduced as in other abelisaurs.
The name "Rahiolisaurus gujaratensis" was first listed in the bibliography of Mendez et al. (2010), which was published online before (February 3) the official description was published (June 28). However, Mendez et al.'s paper was not published on paper until the September issue, making the nomen nudum online only.
References- Chatterjee and Rudra, 1996. KT events in India: Impact, rifting, volcanism and dinosaur extinction. In Novas and Molnar (eds.). Proceedings of the Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium: Memiors of the Queensland Museum. 39(3), 489-532.
Mendez, Novas and Chatterjee, 2010. An abelisaurid humerus from the Upper Cretaceous of India. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 84(3), 421-425.
Novas, Chaterjee, Rudra and Datta, 2010. Rahiolisaurus gujaratensis, n. gen. n. sp., a new abelisaurid theropod from the Late Cretaceous of India. In Bandyopadhyay (ed). New aspects of Mesozoic biodiversity. Springer. Lecture Notes in Earth Science. 132, 185 pp.

"Bayosaurus" Coria, Currie and Carabajal, 2006
"B. pubica" Gasparini, Salgado and Coria, 2007
Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Lisandro Formation of the Rio Limay Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Material- (MCF-PVPH-237; Cerro Bayo Mesa taxon) eleventh dorsal vertebra (63 mm), anterior sacrum (91, 110, 62 mm), incomplete ilium, proximal pubes, proximal ischia
Comments- Coria et al. (2006) do not officially name this specimen, but the name "Bayosaurus" can be found in large font in their cladogram (figure 6), while the specimen number MCF-PVPH-237 is lacking. Thus, one can infer they intended to name the specimen "Bayosaurus", but the name was left in the figure accidentally. This is confirmed by Coria (pers. comm. to Auditore, 2007). Gasparini et al. (2007) reference "Bayosaurus pubica", citing Coria's chapter in the same volume, yet Coria never uses that name. This is apparently another prepublication mistake. Initially identified merely as an abelisaurian (abelisauroid in Coria et al.'s usage), Tortosa et al. (2014) recovered it as closer to abelisaurids than noasaurids, and Filippi et al. (2016; as the Cerro Bayo Mesa taxon) found it to be a brachyrostran closer to furileusaurians than Xenotarsosaurus, Dahalokely and Rahiolisaurus, but outside Carnotaurini.
References- Coria, Currie and Carabajal, 2006. A new abelisauroid theropod from Northwestern Patagonia. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 43, 1283-1289.
Gasparini, Salgado and Coria, 2007. Reptilian faunal succession in the Mesozoic of Patagonia: An updated overview. In Gasparini, Salgado and Coria (eds.). Patagonian Mesozoic Reptiles. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana. 335-358.
Tortosa, Buffetaut, Vialle, Dutour, Turini and Cheylan, 2014. A new abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of southern France: Palaeobiogeographical implications. Annales de Paléontologie. 100(1), 63-86.
Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016. A new brachyrostran with hypertrophied axial structures reveals an unexpected radiation of latest Cretaceous abelisaurids. Cretaceous Research. 61, 209-219.

Ilokelesia Coria and Salgado, 2000
= "Ilokelesia" Coria and Salgado vide Coria, 1999
I. aguadagradensis Coria and Salgado, 2000
Late Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Huincul Formation of Rio Limay Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (~5 m) postorbital, quadrate, occipital condyle, partial third cervical vertebra, fourth cervical vertebra, posterior dorsal vertebra, five mid caudal vertebrae, eight chevrons, eight pedal phalanges, two pedal unguals
Diagnosis- (after Coria and Salgado, 2000) quadrate with reduced lateral condyle; cervical vertebrae with very reduced diapopostzygopophyseal laminae; dorsal vertebrae with ventrally concave infraparapophyseal laminae and with ventrally oriented parapophyses; dorsal vertebrae lacking pleurocoels; mid caudal vertebrae with distally expanded transverse processes bearing anteriorly and posteriorly projecting processes; distal edge of caudal transverse processes exhibiting a gently sigmoid profile that is convex anteriorly and concave posteriorly.
Comments- Note issue 15 of GAIA is listed as December 1998 but was not actually published until October 2000.
References- Coria, 1999. Ornithopod dinosaurs from the Neuquén Group, Patagonia, Argentina: Phylogeny and biostratigraphy. In Tomida, Rich and Vickers-Rich (eds). Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium, National Science Museum Monographs 15. 47-60.
Coria and Salgado, 1999. A primitive abelisaur theropod from the Rio Limay Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(3), 39A.
Coria and Salgado, 2000. A basal Abelisauria Novas 1992 (Theropoda-Ceratosauria) from the Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina. Gaia. 15, 89-102.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.

Ekrixinatosaurus Calvo, Rubilar-Roger and Moreno, 2004
= "Ekrixinatosaurus" Juarez Valieri, Fiorelli and Cruz, 2004
E. novasi Calvo, Rubilar-Roger and Moreno, 2004
= "Ekrixinatosaurus novasi" Juarez Valieri, Fiorelli and Cruz, 2004
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Candelaros Formation of Rio Limay Group, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (MUCPv-294) (7-8 m, ~1.4 tons) (skull ~850 mm) partial maxillae, postorbital, squamosal, frontals, parietals, parasphenoid, occiput, incomplete dentaries, teeth, anterior cervical vertebra, mid-posterior cervical vertebra, dorsal centrum, dorsal ribs, sacrum, caudal vertebrae, chevrons, ilia, pubis, proximal ischia, femora (776 mm), tibiae (694 mm), proximal fibula, astragalus, calcaneum, metatarsals, phalanx II-1 (118 mm), phalanx III-1 (128 mm), phalanges, pedal ungual
Diagnosis- (after Calvo et al., 2004) fenestra between postorbital and frontal; posteriorly directed protuberance on contact of parietal and paroccipital process; anteroposteriorly compressed cervical vertebrae; cervical neural spines as tall as epipophyses; mid-posterior cervical centrum with flat venter; two wide foramina on mid-posterior cervical vertebrae; small prespinal depression with pneumatic excavation connected to neural canal in mid-posterior cervical vertebrae; small prespinal lamina on mid-cervical vertebrae; tibia with swelling at midshaft.
References- Juárez Valieri, Fiorelli and Cruz, 2004. Quilmesaurus curriei Coria, 2001. Su validez taxonómica y relaciones filogenéticas. XX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontología de Vertebrados, Resúmenes. 36-37.
Calvo, Rubilar-Roger and Moreno, 2004. A new Abelisauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from northwest Patagonia. Ameghiniana. 41(4), 555-563.
Juarez Valieri, Porfiri and Calvo, 2011. New information on Ekrixinatosaurus novasi Calvo et al 2004, a giant and massively-constructed abelisauroid from the "Middle Cretaceous" of Patagonia. In Calvo, Porfiri, Gonzalez Riga and Dos Santos (eds.). 2. Paleontología y Dinosaurios desde América Latina. 161-169.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.

Skorpiovenator Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, 2009
= "Skorpiovenator" Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, online 2008
S. bustingorryi Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, 2009
= "Skorpiovenator bustingorryi" Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, online 2008
Late Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Huincul Formation of Rio Limay Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (MMCH-PV 48) (~6 m, ~1.2 tons) skull, mandible, ten cervical vertebrae, cervical ribs, eleven dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, few gastralia, sacrum, caudal vertebrae 1-12, three distal caudal vertebrae, chevron, ulna, ilium, proximal pubis, proximal ischium, femora, tibiae, fibula, astragali, calcaneum, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanges III-2, phalanges III-3, pedal ungual III, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4
Diagnosis- (after Canale et al., 2009) ascending process of maxilla homogeneously wide anteroposteriorly; maxillary horizontal ramus dorsoventrally deep with subparallel dorsal and ventral margins; maxilla/jugal contact subvertical; 19 maxillary teeth; lacrimal anteriorly projected and with well-developed suborbital process; quadratojugal with pronounced posterodorsal notch; dentary with posteroventral process bifurcated to receive anterior end of angular; angular with anterior end dorsoventrally deep to fit between splenial and prearticular.
Comments- Canale et al.'s paper was published online in December 2008 before being officially published on paper in March 2009.
References- Canale, Scanferla, Agnolin and Novas, 2009. New carnivorous dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of NW Patagonia and the evolution of abelisaurid theropods. Naturwissenschaften. 96, 409-414.
Novas, Agnolin, Ezcurra, Porfiri and Canale, 2013. Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research. 45, 174-215.
Canale and Novas, 2015. New information about the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Skorpiovenator bustingorryi (Theropoda, Ceratosauria) from the Upper Cretaceous of Neuquen Province, Patagonia, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2015, 102.

Furileusauria Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Ilokelesia aguadagrandensis, Skorpiovenator bustingoryi, Majungasaurus crenatissimus) (Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016)
= Carnotaurinae sensu Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Skorpiovenator bustingorryi)
Reference- Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016. A new brachyrostran with hypertrophied axial structures reveals an unexpected radiation of latest Cretaceous abelisaurids. Cretaceous Research. 61, 209-219.

Pycnonemosaurus Kellner and Campos, 2002
P. nevesi Kellner and Campos, 2002
Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Adamantina Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Holotype- (DGM 859-R) five teeth, rib fragments, two incomplete caudal vertebrae, four caudal centra, caudal transverse process, distal pubis, tibia, distal fibula, fragments
Diagnosis- (after Kellner and Campos, 2002) hatchet-shaped cnemial crest; relatively small pubic foot; moderate distal expansion of caudal transverse processes.
References- Bittencourt and Kellner, 2002. Abelisauria (Theropoda, Dinosauria) teeth from Brazil. Boletim do Museu Nacional, Nova Série. 63, 1-8.
Kellner and Campos, 2002. On a theropod dinosaur (Abelisauria) from the continental Cretaceous of Brazil. Arquivos do Museu Nacional. 60(3), 163-170.

Quilmesaurus Coria, 2001
Q. curriei Coria, 2001
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Allen Formation, Rio Negro, Argentina

Holotype- (MPCA-PV-100) distal femur, tibia (520 mm)
Comments- Juarez Valieri et al. (2004) assigned Quilmesaurus to Abelisauridae based on the marked distal expansion of the cnemial crest and the asymmetrical distal end of the tibia, and to Carnotaurinae because of the downturned distal part of the cnemial crest. More recently, it has been recovered as a basal furileusaurian in the Tortosa et al. matrix.
Reference- Coria, 2001. New theropod from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. In Tanke and Carpenter (eds.). Mesozoic Vertebrate Life: New Research inspired by the Paleontology of Philip J. Currie. Indiana University Press, Bloomington & Indianapolis, Indiana. 3-9.
Juárez Valieri, Fiorelli and Cruz, 2004. Quilmesaurus curriei Coria, 2001. Su validez taxonómica y relaciones filogenéticas. XX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontología de Vertebrados (La Plata), Resúmenes: 36-37.

Viavenator Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016
V. exxoni Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Bajo de la Carpa Formation of the Rio Colorado Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (MAU-Pv-LI-530) postorbitals, squamosal, braincase, incomplete tooth, tooth fragments, hyoid, atlas, third cervical vertebra, fourth cervical vertebra, fifth cervical vertebra, seventh cervical vertebra, eighth cervical vertebra, ninth cervical vertebra, tenth cervical vertebra, cervical ribs, second dorsal vertebra, fourth dorsal vertebra, fifth dorsal vertebra, seventh dorsal vertebra, eighth dorsal vertebra, ninth dorsal vertebra, tenth dorsal vertebra, dorsal ribs, gastralial fragments, five proximal caudal vertebrae, five mid caudal vertebrae, two distal caudal vertebrae, chevron, scapulocoracoid, distal ischium
Diagnosis- (after Filippi et al., 2016) no frontal dorsal prominences; dorsal edge of postorbital does not expand, with jugal process anteriorly projected and anteroposteriorly narrow; parietal depression transversally
compressed; small paraoccipital processes with ventral edge located above level of dorsal occipital condyle edge; basioccipital-opisthotic complex, about two and a half times width of occipital condyle and almost twice height of occipital condyle in posterior view; high and well developed crest below the occipital condyle, diverging laterally toward the basal tubera, defining the ventral subcondylar recess; basisphenoid recess highly developed and deeply excavated, with subcircular contour opening ventrally, with well-defined borders, and its major axis transversely oriented; basipterygoid processes positioned horizontally relative to cranial roof, located on level slightly dorsal to basal tubera; anterior surface of cervical centra with poorly developed articular condyle; anterior projection of cervical epipophyses, well developed between fourth and seventh; mid and posterior cervical centra with slightly convex lateral and ventral surfaces; hyposphene-hypanthrum articulations present from second dorsal; interspinous accessory articulation system developed in mid and posterior dorsal vertebrae; pair of pneumatic foramina within proximal caudal prespinal fossa; proximal and mid caudal vertebrae with distal edge of transverse process convex, and strong development of anterior projection; distal scapula posteriorly recurved.
Comments- Filippi et al. (2016) added this to Tortosa et al.'s ceratosaur analysis and found it to be a basal furileusaurian.
Reference- Filippi, Mendez, Juarez Valieri and Garrido, 2016. A new brachyrostran with hypertrophied axial structures reveals an unexpected radiation of latest Cretaceous abelisaurids. Cretaceous Research. 61, 209-219.

Carnotaurini Coria, Chiappe and Dingus, 2002
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei + Aucasaurus garridoi) (Coria, Chiappe and Dingus, 2002)

Carnotaurinae Sereno, 1998
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Abelisaurus comahuensis) (Sereno et al., 2004; modified from Sereno, 1998)
Other definitions- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Skorpiovenator bustingorryi) (Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015)
References- Hendrickx, Hartman and Mateus, 2015. An overview of non-avian theropod discoveries and classification. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology. 12(1), 1-73.

Carnotaurus Bonaparte, 1985
C. sastrei Bonaparte, 1985
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
La Colonia Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Holotype- (MACN-CH 894) (8.11 m, 1.5 tons) almost complete skeleton including skull (596 mm), corpus, ceratobranchials, atlas (45 mm), axis (118 mm), third cervical vertebra (100 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (110 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (119 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (120 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (110 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (108 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (104 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (98 mm), cervical ribs 1-10, first dorsal vertebra (100 mm), second dorsal vertebra (101 mm), third dorsal vertebra (103 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (108 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (101 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (117 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (123 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (122 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (120 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (116 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (120 mm), dorsal ribs 1-11, gastralia, first sacral vertebra (132 mm), second sacral vertebra (115 mm), third sacral vertebra (112 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (~98 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (~71 mm), sixth sacral vertebra (118 mm), seventh sacral vertebra (124 mm), first caudal vertebra (~128 mm), second caudal vertebra (122 mm), third caudal vertebra (120 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (136 mm), fifth caudal neural arch, sixth caudal neural arch, twelfth caudal centrum, fragments of chevrons, scapulocoracoids (905, 900 mm), clavicle, sternal plates (180 mm long), humeri (285, 284 mm), radii (73, 80 mm), ulnae (78, 85 mm), metacarpal I (30 mm), metacarpals II (37, 36 mm), partial phalanx II-1, metacarpals III (29, 31 mm), partial phalanges III-1 (~40 mm), manual ungual III, metacarpals IV (84 mm), two pairs of carpals or manual phalanges, ilia (970 mm), pubes (880 mm), ischia, femora (1.03 m), proximal tibiae, skin impressions
Comments- Though originally reported as being from the Albian-Cenomanian Gorro Frigio Formation, it is actually from much later sediments (Lamanna et al., 2002).
References- Bonaparte, 1985. A horned Cretaceous carnosaur from Patagonia. National Geographic Research. 1, 149-151.
Bonaparte, Novas and Coria, 1990. Carnotaurus sastrei Bonaparte, the horned, lightly built carnosaur from the Middle Cretaceous of Patagonia. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Contributions in Science. 416, 41 pp.
Bonaparte, 1991. The Gondwanian theropod families Abelisauridae and Noasauridae. Historical Biology. 5, 1-25.
Lamanna, Martinez and Smith, 2002. A definitive abelisaurid theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(1), 58-69.
Senter and Parrish, 2006. Forelimb function in the theropod dinosaur Carnotaurus sastrei, and its behavioral implications. PaleoBios. 26(3), 7-17.
Cisilino, Calvo, Mazzetta and Blanco, 2009. FEA for understanding the cranial mechanics of a dinosaur from Patagonia. iacm expressions. 26, 12-17.
Paulina-Carabajal, 2009. El neurocráneo de los dinosaurios Theropoda de la Argentina: Osteología y sus implicancias filogenéticas. PhD thesis, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 554 pp.
Ruiz and Novas, 2009. New insights about the anatomy of the hand of Carnotaurus sastrei (Theropoda: Abelisauridae). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 173A.
Persons, 2010. Anatomy of a speed demon: The caudal musculature of Carnotaurus and the implications for abelisaurid locomotion and evolutionary trajectory. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2010, 145A.
Carabajal, 2011. The braincase anatomy of Carnotaurus sastrei (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 31(2), 378-386.
Persons and Currie, 2011. Dinosaur speed demon: The caudal musculature of Carnotaurus sastrei and implications for the evolution of South American abelisaurids. PLoS ONE. 6(10), e25763.
Ruiz, Torices, Serrano and Lopez, 2011. The hand structure of Carnotaurus sastrei (Theropoda, Abelisauridae): Implications for hand diversity and evolution in abelisaurids. Palaeontology. 54(6), 1271-1277.

Abelisaurinae Bonaparte and Novas, 1985 sensu Paul, 1988
Definition- (Abelisaurus comahuensis <- Carnotaurus sastrei) (modified from Sereno, 1998)

Abelisaurus Bonaparte and Novas, 1985
A. comahuensis Bonaparte and Novas, 1985
Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Allen or Anacleto Formation, Rio Negro, Argentina
(Leanza et al., 2004)
Holotype- (MC 11098) incomplete skull (856 mm)
References- Bonaparte and Novas, 1985. Abelisaurus comahuensis, n. g., n. sp., Carnosauria from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Ameghiniana. 21, 259-265.
Bonaparte, 1991. The Gondwanian theropod families Abelisauridae and Noasauridae. Historical Biology. 5, 1-25.
Paulina-Carabajal, 2009. El neurocráneo de los dinosaurios Theropoda de la Argentina: Osteología y sus implicancias filogenéticas. PhD thesis, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 554 pp.
Carabajal, 2011. Braincases of abelisaurid theropods from the Upper Cretaceous of North Patagonia. Palaeontology. 54(4), 793-806.
Gianechini, Apesteguia, Landini, Finotti, Valieri and Zandonai, 2015. New abelisaurid remains from the Anacleto Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Patagonia, Argentina. Cretaceous Research. 54, 1-16.

Aucasaurus Coria, Chiappe and Dingus, 2002
= "Aucasaurus" Dingus and Chiappe, 2001
A. garridoi Coria, Chiappe and Dingus, 2002
= "Aucasaurus garridoi" Dingus and Chiappe, 2001
= Abelisaurus garridoi (Coria, Chiappe and Dingus, 2002) Paul, 2010
Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Anacleto Formation of Rio Colorado Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Holotype- (MCF-PVPH-236) (adult) skull, mandible, cervical series, cervical ribs, dorsal series, dorsal ribs, gastralia, sacrum, first-thirteenth caudal vertebrae, distal caudal fragments, ten chevrons, scapulocoracoid, humerus, radius, ulna, metacarpal I, metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, metacarpal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, metacarpal IV, pelvis, femora, tibiotarsi, fibulae, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, pedal ungual I, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, pedal ungual II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, pedal ungual III, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4, pedal ungual IV, metatarsal V
Diagnosis- (from Coria et al., 2002) differs from Carnotaurus in- longer and lower rostrum and external antorbital fenestra; horizontal ventral margin of the antorbital fenestra; complete lateral exposure of the maxillary fenestra; frontal swells instead of horns; sigmoidal outline of the dentigerous margin of the maxilla; less developed coracoidal process; forelimb relatively longer; humerus with a slender and craniocaudally compressed shaft and well-defined condyles; proximal radius lacking a hooked ulnar process; chevrons with dorsally open haemal canals.
References- Coria, Chiappe and Dingus, 2000. A new abelisaur theropod from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(3), 36A-37A.
Dingus and Chiappe, 2001. Walking on Eggs: The Astonishing Discovery of Thousands of Dinosaur Eggs in the Badlands of Patagonia. Scribner. 219 pp.
Coria, Chiappe and Dingus 2002. A new close relative of Carnotaurus sastrei Bonaparte 1985 (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(2), 460-465.
Paulina-Carabajal, 2009. El neurocráneo de los dinosaurios Theropoda de la Argentina: Osteología y sus implicancias filogenéticas. PhD thesis, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 554 pp.
Paul, 2010. The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs. Princeton University Press. 320 pp.
Carabajal, 2011. Braincases of abelisaurid theropods from the Upper Cretaceous of North Patagonia. Palaeontology. 54(4), 793-806.
Paulina-Carabajal and Succar, 2015. The endocranial morphology and inner ear of the abelisaurid theropod Aucasaurus garridoi. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(1), 141-144.