= Ceratosauroidea sensu Sereno, 1998
Definition- (Carnotaurus sastrei <- Coelophysis bauri) (modified)
= Neoceratosauria sensu Padian et al., 1999
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis <- Coelophysis bauri) (modified)

Neotheropoda Bakker, 1986
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis + Passer domesticus) (modified from Padian et al., 1999)
Other definitions- (Coelophysis bauri + Passer domesticus) (Sereno, 2004; modified from Wilson et al., 2003; modified from Sereno, 1998)
(Ceratosaurus nasicornis + Allosaurus fragilis) (modified from Kischlat, 2000)
= Averostra sensu Ezcurra and Cuny, 2007
Definition- (Ceratosaurus nasicornis + Allosaurus fragilis)
Comments- Neotheropoda was named by Bakker (1986) in a figure for a clade containing ceratosaurs and tetanurines (his Dinoaves), but excluding coelophysids (his podokesaurs). In 1988, Bakker et al. used the name in the same manner. It was generally ignored for the following decade, as most workers followed Gauthier's phylogeny which placed coelophysids in Ceratosauria instead of basal to it. Sereno (1995) revived the name in an abstract for a clade containing ceratosaurs (including coelophysoids) and tetanurines but not Eoraptor or Herrerasaurus, making his concept different than Bakker's. Sereno later (1998) gave the first phylogenetic definition for the clade- "Coelophysis, Neornithes, their most recent common ancestor and all descendants." Wilson et al. (2003) specified Coelophysis bauri, while Sereno (2004) specified Passer domesticus. Padian et al. (1999) used a different definition- "The most recent common ancestor uniting Neornithes and Ceratosaurus, and all descendants of that common ancestor." I've modified it by using Ceratosaurus nasicornis and Passer domesticus as the internal specifiers. Kischlat (2000) used a similar definition, but substituted Allosaurus for Neornithes since Theropoda is based on Allosaurus (I modify his definition by using type species C. nasicornis and A. fragilis). Since birds were included in Bakker's Neotheropoda and there's no Phylocode rule that modifications of clade names have to be based on the same internal specifier as the original clade, I retain Padian et al.'s version. This class of definition encompasses the same group as Sereno's in Padian et al.'s preferred cladograms, but retains Bakker's membership for the clade if used in a topology similar to his. As Bakker's topology is becoming the consensus, the definition of Neotheropoda is important if we wish to retain his concept of the clade. However, most workers currently use Sereno's definition and increasingly use Averostra for Bakker's neotheropod clade if they name it at all.
References- Bakker, 1986. The Dinosaur Heresies. William Morrow, New York. 481 pp.
Bakker, Williams and Currie, 1988. Nanotyrannus, a new genus of pygmy tyrannosaur, from the latest Cretaceous of Montana. Hunteria. 1, 1-30.
Sereno, 1995. Theropoda: Early evolution and major patterns of diversification. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 15(3), 52A-53A.
Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 210, 41-83.
Padian, Hutchinson and Holtz, 1999. Phylogenetic definitions and nomenclature of the major taxonomic categories of the carnivorous dinosaurs Dinosauria (Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(1), 69-80.
Kischlat, 2000. Tecodoncios: A aurora dos Arcosaurios no Triassico. In Holz and De Rose (eds.). Paleontologia do Rio Grande do Sul. 273-316.
Wilson, Sereno, Srivastava, Bhatt, Khosla and Sahni, 2003. A new abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lameta Formation (Cretaceous, Maastrichtian) of India. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan. 31, 1-42.
Sereno, 2004. Phylogenetic nomenclature for stem crocodilians and birds, exclusive of Pterosauria. First International Phylogenetic Nomenclature Meeting, Abstracts. 26.

"Allosaurus" medius Marsh, 1888
= Antrodemus medius (Marsh, 1888) Hay, 1902
= Dryptosaurus medius (Marsh, 1888) Gilmore, 1920
= Labrosaurus medius (Marsh, 1888) Kuhn, 1939
Late Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Arundel Formation, Maryland, US

Holotype- (USNM 4972) tooth (75 mm)
Referred- ?(Chas Coffin coll.) tooth (Lull, 1911)
?(Goucher College 2521; lost) pedal phalanx III-1 (110 mm) (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 3121) tooth (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 3446) tooth (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 5685; not Goucher College, contra Lull) tooth (76 mm) (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 5693) tooth (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 8447) tooth (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 8502; = Goucher College 2534) anterior sacral centrum (90 mm) (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 8503; = Goucher College 2614) proximal caudal centrum (107 mm) (Lull, 1911)
?(USNM 8504; = Goucher College 2536) proximal half of pedal phalanx II-1 (Lull, 1911)
Diagnosis- Provisionally indeterminate relative to Acrocanthosaurus atokensis.
Comments- Lipka (pers. comm.) notes the holotype tooth is almost identical to Acrocanthosaurus atokensis, so these taxa may be synonymous. None of the referred material can be assigned to this taxon with certainty, as it is not comparable (postcrania) or has not been compared in detail (teeth). Lull (1911) originally believed USNM 8502 to be a posterior dorsal centrum.
References- Marsh, 1888. Notice of a new genus of Sauropoda and other new dinosaurs from the Potomac Formation. American Journal of Science. 35, 89-94.
Hay, 1902. Bibliography and Catalogue of the Fossil Vertebrata of North America. Bulletin of the United States Geological Survey. 179, 868 pp.
Lull, 1911. Systematic paleontology of the Lower Cretaceous deposits of Maryland: Vertebrata. Maryland Geological Survey. Lower Cretaceous, 183-211.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. United States National Museum Bulletin. 110, l-154.
Kuhn, 1939. Beitrage zur Keuperfauna von Halberstadt. Palaeontologische Zeitschrift. 21, 258-286.

Allosaurus? trihedrodon (Cope, 1877) Glut, 1997
= Laelaps trihedrodon Cope, 1877
= Dryptosaurus trihedrodon (Cope, 1877) Hay, 1902
= Creosaurus trigonodon (misspelling of trihedrodon) (Cope, 1877) Osborn, 1931
= Antrodemus trihedrodon (Cope, 1877) Kuhn, 1939
= Hypsirophus trihedrodon (Cope, 1877) Cope vide Chure, 2001
Kimmeridgian-Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Memberr of the Morrison Formation, Colorado, US

Holotype- (lost) dentary, eight teeth
Referred- ?(AMNH coll., lost) femur, tibia (Chure, 2001)
?(lost) skull fragments, other bones (Chure, 2001)
Comments- The holotype is lost and was not described in enough detail to support synonymy with Allosaurus or other large Morrison theropods. AMNH 5780 was referred to this taxon as well, but is probably an Allosaurus specimen.
References- Cope, 1877. On a carnivorous dinosaurian from the Dakota beds of Colorado. Bulletin of the United States Geological Survey. 3(33), 805-806.
Hay, 1902. Bibliography and Catalogue of the Fossil Vertebrata of North America. Bulletin of the United States Geological Survey. 179, 868 pp.
Osborn, 1931. Cope: Master Naturalist. Princeton: Princeton University Press, New York. 740 pp.
Kuhn, 1939. Beiträge zur Keuperfauna von Halberstadt [Contributions to the Keuper fauna of Halberstadt]. Palaeontologische Zeitschrift. 21, 258-286.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, North Carolina. 1076 pp.
Chure, 2001. On the type and referred material of Laelaps trihedrodon Cope 1877 (Dinosauria: Theropoda). In Tanke and Carpenter (eds.). Mesozoic Vertebrate Life: New Research Inspired by the Paleontology of Philip J. Currie. Indiana University Press, Bloomington & Indianapolis, Indiana. 10-18.

Calamospondylus Fox vide Anonymous, 1866
C. oweni Fox vide Anonymous, 1866
Early Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Wessex Formation, England

Holotype- (lost) sacrum (152 mm), ilial fragments
Comments- This is not the same specimen as the Aristosuchus pusillus holotype (Naish, 2002), nor is it definitively shown to be synonymous with Aristosuchus or Calamosaurus.
References- Anonymous, 1866. Another new Wealden reptile. The Athenaeum. 2014, 740.
Naish, 2002. The historical taxonomy of the Lower Cretaceous theropods (Dinosauria) Calamospondylus and Aristosuchus from the Isle of Wight. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 113, 153-163.

"Capitalsaurus" Kranz, 1998
"C." potens (Lull, 1911) new comb.
= Creosaurus potens Lull, 1911
= Dryptosaurus potens (Lull, 1911) Gilmore, 1920
Late Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Arundel Formation, Maryland, US

Holotype- (USNM 3049) (7-10 m) proximal caudal centrum (140 mm)
Referred- ?(USNM 8505) manual ungual I (Gilmore, 1920)
Diagnosis- proximal caudal centra slightly opisthocoelous; proximal caudal centra with single ventral keel.
Description- The holotype was collected by J. K. Murphy in a Washington D.C. sewer. Comparison with Allosaurus (Madsen, 1976) indicates that the holotype is probably from the fifth or sixth caudal vertebra. Based on this, it is probably from an animal 7-10 meters long. Although Gilmore (1920) referred the mid-portion of a large pedal ungual I (USNM 8505) to this taxon, this was only based on size and provenence. No valid criterion suggest such an assignment was warrented, so it will not be discussed further.
The specimen is a proximal caudal centrum missing the neural arch and spine. In addition, some of the posterior surface has been abraded. The centrum is slightly opisthocoelous, with the anterior articular surface slanted slightly posteroventrally. It is strongly compressed laterally (anterior face 130 percent as tall as wide) and roughly oval in anterior view, with flattened sides. The neural canal is broad, though constricted in the middle. Ventrally, the centrum shows a single median keel, with a chevron facet posteriorly. Additionally, the ventral edge is only very slightly concave in lateral view. It is cancellous internally and lacks pleurocoels.
Relationships- Comparison to other theropods is difficult due to both the fragmentary nature of the specimen and the few detailed descriptions of caudal centra in the literature. As "Capitalsaurus" was discovered in Cretaceous deposits, it is assumed that the centrum did not derive from a basal theropod such as a coelophysoid or Dilophosaurus, which are only known from the Triassic and Early Jurassic. This species has been referred to Allosaurus and Dryptosaurus in the past, but is stratigraphically closest to Acrocanthosaurus. It will be compared to these three genera first, then to other genera that may be similar. The proximal caudals of Allosaurus are amphiplatyan to slightly procoelous, the opposite of "Capitalsaurus". Also, they are about as wide as tall, sometimes wider, and the ventral edge is much more concave. The ventral surface has a slight groove instead of a keel. Those of Dryptosaurus share the straighter ventral edge and are slightly taller than wide (~1.05 times), but no further details can be discerned. Acrocanthosaurus has caudal pleurocoels (like Carcharodontosaurus, but not Giganotosaurus), a concave ventral margin and amphiplatyan or amphicoelous centra. The ventral surface is grooved and the centra are 1-1.2 times taller than wide. The only theropod described as having opisthocoelous caudals is the segnosaur Nothronychus. This taxon differs from "Capitalsaurus" in having a median ventral groove, pleurocoels, an autapmorphic posterolateral tubercle, larger chevron facets and being slightly wider (1.16 times taller than wide). Among other segnosaurs, at least Neimongosaurus and Segnosaurus lack opisthocoelous centra. Several theropods are known to lack ventral grooves on the proximal caudals. These include Elaphrosaurus, Carnotaurus, Eustreptospondylus, Suchomimus, Sinraptor dongi, "Alashansaurus", Ornithomimus? sedens and alvarezsaurids. Of these, only alvarezsaurids are known have ventral keels, though the condition in most others is uncertain in this regard. Although most other theropods (eg. Ceratosaurus, Torvosaurus, Monolophosaurus, Nedcolbertia, Sinraptor hepingensis, Tyrannosaurus, Archaeornithomimus, Gallimimus, Microvenator, Chirostenotes) are described as having a ventral groove, the condition in Sinraptor dongi at least changes from convex in the proximal caudals to grooved in the mid and posterior caudals. This suggests our knowledge of which theropods have convex ventral surfaces on their proximal caudals is extremely limited, and subject to change as specimens are described more fully. Although alvarezsaurids do have ventral keels, they are otherwise quite dissimilar to "Capitalsaurus" in having strongly procoelous centra. Several theropods are similar to "Capitalsaurus" in having centra over 1.2 times taller than they are wide, including Monolophosaurus, sinraptorids and Bagaraatan. Theropods known to have more circular centra are Ceratosaurus, Carnotaurus, Elaphrosaurus, Torvosaurus, Baryonyx, Piatnitzkyosaurus, Allosaurus, Acrocanthosaurus, Carcharodontosaurus, Dryptosaurus, ornithomimids and oviraptorosaurs (which are diagnosed in part by their wide caudal centra). Paravians have distinctively subrectangular centra, so "Capitalsaurus" can be excluded from this clade. The condition found in "Capitalsaurus", where the ventral edge of the centrum is nearly straight, is extremely rare in theropods, being otherwise noted in Dryptosaurus, tyrannosaurids and Bagaraatan. This can vary greatly with position in some taxa such as Bagaraatan, so undue emphasis shouldn't be placed on the character. While clearly not a derived oviraptorosaur or paravian, the current phylogenetic utility of proximal caudal centra does not allow placement more precise than assumed Neotheropoda incertae sedis. While currently unique compared to described theropod caudals, the amount of variation between caudal centra in single specimens is just starting to be revealed (Sinraptor dongi's ventral groove/keel; titanosaurid's articular surfaces varying from opisthocoelous to procoelous; Bagaraatan's ventral edge concavity). Because of this potentially high variation, I am extremely cautious as to the taxonomic utility of this caudal centrum and only doubtfully retain it as a valid taxon.
Comments- The genus "Capitalsaurus" was only used in a faunal list by Kranz (1998), though Kranz (pers. comm.) informs me it is meant as a replacement name for Creosaurus potens. As it has not been associated with a particular species or specimen in the literature, it is a nomen nudum.
References- Lull, 1911. The reptilian fauna of the Arundel Formation. Maryland Geological Survey. Lower Cretaceous, 173-178.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. United States National Museum Bulletin. 110, l-154.
Madsen, 1976. Allosaurus fragilis: A revised osteology. Utah Geological Survey Bulletin. 109, 1-163.
Kranz, 1998. Mostly dinosaurs: A review of the vertebrates of the Potomac Group (Aptian Arundel Formation), USA. In Lucas, Kirkland and Estep (eds.). New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 14, 235-238.

Chienkosaurus Young, 1942
C. ceratosauroides Young, 1942
Bathonian-Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Shangshaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China

Holotype- (IVPP V237) premaxillary tooth (73 mm)
Referred- ?(IVPP V190) partial mid caudal centrum (Young, 1942)
?(IVPP V192) partial dorsal centrum (Young, 1942)
?(IVPP V193) ulna (225 mm) (Young, 1942)
Comments- Three other teeth included in the holotype are from Hsisosuchus (Dong et al., 1983).
The tooth is similar to many large theropod teeth in general characters, but is from the premaxilla as evidenced by the twisted anterior carina and reduced extent of anterior serrations. It is currently undiagnostic compared to contemporaneous taxa like Sinraptor and Yangchuanosaurus.
The referred ulna is most similar to Piatnitzkysaurus, though it differs in not being bowed posteriorly, and the olecranon appears broken off. This is a more diagnostic specimen than the holotype, but is unfortunately not definitely referrable to the same individual or taxon.
The referred caudal centrum is from a different locality, so is definitely not referrable to the holotype individual, but was thought to be "probably belonging to Chienkosaurus" by Young in his plate. Comparison to Allosaurus suggests it is from somewhere around caudal twenty-five, but it is indeterminate. Both it and the dorsal centrum are stated to fit in size with Chienkosaurus, though the dorsal is unillustrated and not explicitly referred to the taxon.
References- Young, 1942. Fossil vertebrates from Kuangyuan, N. Szechuan, China. Bulletin of the Geological Society of China. 22(3-4), 293-309.
Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983. Dinosaurs from the Jurassic of Sichuan. Palaeontologica Sinica. Whole Number 162, New Series C, 23, 136 pp.

"Coelurosaurus" Huene, 1929
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Allen Formation, Rio Negro, Argentina
Material
- (MLP CS 1478) partial ungual (~19 mm)
Comments- Coelurosaurus was listed by Huene (1929) in a faunal list for MLP CS 1478, a partial ungual from the Allen Formation. As Olshevsky (DML, 1999) noted, the name is probably a typographical error for Coelurosauria made when translating the paper from German to Spanish. This is indicated by the fact he never attaches a name to the specimen in the description or plates (it's described under the heading "coelurosaur claw"). Since "Coelurosaurus" was apparently not meant as a valid name when it was published (ICZN Article 11.5), it is a nomen nudum.
The ungual consists of the distal half, which exhibits an interesting combination of features. It is highly curved and transversely compressed, suggesting it is a tetanurine manual ungual or a paravian pedal ungual (though note both Mapusaurus and alvarezsaurids differ in being straighter). The cross section at midlength is triangular (expanded ventrally), unlike the roughtly oval shape of most theropod manual unguals (e.g. Noasaurus, Fukuiraptor, Deinonychus) or the blade-like shape of Megaraptor's manual unguals and paravian sickle claws. Yet the shape is not similar to most theropod pedal unguals either, as the ventral surface is concave and the ventral transverse expansion does not flare past the sides of the ungual. Notably, the ungual is quite asymmetric, with one wall of the ventral groove projecting further ventrally. This is more prominent distally, where the groove faces more to the side than downward. The asymmetry and ventral groove are characteristic of abelisaurid pedal unguals, though these are more straight and broad. Noasaurid pedal unguals (as judged by Masiakasaurus) are also straight, are only slightly asymmetrical and are keeled ventrally. Noasaurus itself possesses a controversial ungual most recently thought to be manual which is curved and compressed like "Coelurosaurus", but is not very asymmetrical and has a ventral keel. Another possibility is that "Coelurosaurus" belongs to a bird, as many birds are comparably sized with highly curved pedal unguals. Unfortunately, comparable bird unguals (e.g. Patagopteryx, Soroavisaurus, MACN PV RN 1105) are not described in enough detail to be usefully compared. Huene considered it to be a manual ungual based on its curvature and believed it was a distinct specimen. It is here referred to Neotheropoda incertae sedis due to its Cretaceous age.
References- Huene, 1929. Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html

Diplotomodon Leidy, 1868
= Tomodon Leidy, 1865 (preoccupied Dumeril, 1853)
D. horrificus (Leidy, 1865) Leidy, 1868
= Tomodon horrificus Leidy, 1865
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Navesink or Hornerstown Formation, New Jersey, US

Holotype- (ANSP 9680; holotype of Tomodon horrificus) tooth
Comments- This taxon is often associated with Dryptosaurus aquilunguis, following Molnar (1990). However, the teeth of the latter taxon are not distinctive in their shape, and more detailed comparisons have yet to be made.
References- Leidy, 1865. Memoir on the extinct reptiles of the Cretaceous formations of the United States. Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. 14, 1-135.
Leidy, 1868. Remarks on Conosaurus of Gibbes. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 20, 200-202.
Molnar, 1990. Problematic Theropoda: "Carnosaurs". In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford. 306-317

"Elaphrosaurus" iguidiensis Lapparent, 1960b
= Elaphrosaurus "iguidiensis" Lapparent, 1957
Albain, Early Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Algeria

Syntypes- (MNNHN coll.; from Alrar) tooth
(MNNHN coll.; from Timimoun) incomplete mid caudal vertebra (65 mm)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation, Niger

Syntype- (MNNHN coll.; from El Rhaz) manual ungual (30 mm)
Referred- (MNN GDF coll.) (many individuals) dozen teeth, vertebrae, limb elements, metatarsals, phalanges (Taquet, 1976)
Berriasian-Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Irhazer Shales Formation, Niger

Syntypes- (MNNHN coll.; from Ebrechko) (many individuals) thirty-one teeth
(MNNHN coll.; from Ifayen Ignère) distal caudal vertebra (55 mm)
Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Tegama Group, Niger

Syntype- (MNNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) distal caudal centrum (80 mm)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Tunisia

Syntypes- (MNNHN coll.; from Guermessa) tooth
(MNNHN coll.; from Rémada: Kanboute) tooth
(from Dahar) three teeth (Lapparent, 1951)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Libya
(Giado)
Berriasian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Irhazer Shales Group, Niger
(In Tedreft)
Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Tegama Group, Niger
(Tiguidi: Zinder piste)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Tunisia
(Chenini)
Syntypes- (MNNHN coll.; from Chenini, Giado, In Tedreft, and Tiguidi: Zinder piste in addition to above localities) (many individuals) fifteen teeth, five distal caudal vertebrae (40, 40 mm; from Abangarit, Ifayen Ignère, and/or Timimoun), distal femur, incomplete tibia (350 mm)
Comments- Lapparent (1957) originally used Elaphrosaurus iguidiensis in three faunal lists- Southern Tunisia (Dahar cliff including Guermessa, Chenini, Remada and Dehibat, and Giado), Northern Sahara (including Alrar, In Akhamil, Djoua, Aoulef and Timimoun) and Southern Sahara (including Tamesna, Agades and Tiguidi). As no other information about iguidiensis was provided, this name fails ICZN Article 13.1.1 ("accompanied by a description or definition that states in words characters that are purported to differentiate the taxon") so was a nomen nudum. Among those localities, the only potential material of iguidiensis published earlier are three teeth "of another species of Megalosaurus" (besides saharicus) from Dahar cliff (either Guermessa, Chenini or Remada) mentioned by Lapparent (1951). Lapparent (1960a) later noted caudal vertebrae and fragments of two new Elaphrosaurus species were found in Timimoun and In Tedreft, though the species were left unnamed. Lapparent (1960b) officially named iguidiensis, basing it on remains from fifteen localities which may not belong to the same taxon. The locality of numerous remains was not stated in 1960, though there were four localities listed as having iguidiensis material (Chenini, Giado, In Tedreft, and Tiguidi: Zinder piste) when no material was specified as being from them. The caudals were stated to all be from Abangarit, Ifayen Ignère and Timimoun, so the five unspecified caudals must come from those areas. No holotype was designated, so all 1960b material are syntypes. which material should be made the lectotype is uncertain, though the species name references Tiguidi cliff where undetermined remains from Zinder piste were found.
Lapparent (1960b) only differentiated iguidiensis from Elaphrosaurus bambergi due to "constantly lesser size and some accentuated differences", and from Spinostropheus (then Elaphrosaurus) gautieri due to smaller size and "the form of the vertebrae". The figured teeth are recurved and labiolingually compressed with small distal serrations extending along the entire crown and similar-sized (DSDI ~.8) mesial serrations along the apical half in at least the figured Alrar specimen. Elongation ranges greatly between 1.15-~2.7 times FABL. Enamel is unornamented and the crowns are not separated from the roots by a constriction. The two illustrated caudals are elongated (2.23-2.86 times central height) and amphicoelous to amphiplatyan with no transverse processes. The manual ungual from El Rhaz is said to have vascular grooves that are "situated very high and have a very different shape from those of large theropods" and the hindlimb material is basically undescribed. No appendicular material is illustrated. None of the published data allows assignment to Ceratosauria, Coelurosauria, or other neotheropod groups.
References- Lapparent, 1951. Découverte de Dinosauriens, associés à une faune de Reptiles et de Poissons, dans le Crétacé inférieur de l'Extrême Sud tunisien [Discovery of dinosaurs associated with a reptile and fish fauna in the Lower Cretaceous of extreme southern Tunisia]. Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences à Paris. 232, 1430-1432.
Lapparent, 1957. The Cretaceous dinosaurs of Africa and India. Journal of the Palaeontological Society of India. 2, 109-112.
Lapparent, 1960a. Les dinosaures du Sahara central [The dinosaurs of the central Sahara]. Travaux de l'Institut de Recherches Saharienne.s 19(1-2), 7-24.
Lapparent, 1960b. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Memoirs of the Geological Society of France. 88A, 1-57.
Taquet, 1976. Géologie et Paléontologie du Gisement de Gadoufaoua (Aptien du Niger) [Geology and Paleontology of the Gadoufaoua Locality (Aptian of Niger)]. Cahiers de Paléontologie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris. 191 pp.

"Futabasaurus" Lambert, 1990
Coniacian, Late Cretaceous
Ashizawa Formation of the Futaba Group, Japan
Material
- (unknown collection; Futaba-ryu) (~1.5-2 m) partial tibia (~56 mm wide)
Comments- This specimen was originally mentioned by Hasegawa et al. (1987) in an abstract as Futaba-ryu, as dinosaur remains in Japan are often given nicknames ending in "ryu" (= dragon). Lambert (1990) inappropriately made it into a genus name, listing it as "Futabasaurus" in a childrens' book. It was mentioned as being a large carnosaur (sensu lato) from Japan that had yet to be described. Dong et al. (1990) referred to it as Tyrannosauridae gen. et sp. indet. and published a photograph. Olshevsky (1991) listed it as an allosaurid without comment, and later (DML, 2001) as a probable junior synonym of Tarbosaurus. Chure (2000) briefly discussed and illustrated the specimen, excluding it from Allosauridae based on a few differences from Allosaurus (lateral edge less elongated ventrally; medial edge not rounded and drawn out medially). While these mean "Futabasaurus" is not Allosaurus itself, they do little to pin down its relationships further. With only a low quality photocopy to go by, I can't make any phylogenetic judgements.
A genus of elasmosaurid plesiosaur was later named Futabasaurus by Sato et al. (2006), making the name unavailable for the theropod tibia.
References- Hasegawa, Watanabe, Oshida, Takizawa and Koda, 1987. Dinosaur assemblage from the Futaba Group, Fukushima. Abstract of the Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Japan. 4.
Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book. New York, Avon Books. 320 pp.
Dong, Hasegawa and Azuma, 1990. The Age of Dinosaurs in Japan and China. Fukui, Japan. Fukui Prefectural Museum. 65 pp.
Matsukawa and Obata, 1994. Dinosaurs and sedimentary environments, in the Japanese Cretaceous: A contribution to dinosaur facies in Asia based on molluscan paleontology and stratigraphy. Cretaceous Research. 15, 101-125.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Sato, Hasegawa and Manabe, 2006. A new elasmosaurid plesiosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Fukushima, Japan. Palaeontology. 49(3), 467-484.

Inosaurus Lapparent, 1960
I. tedreftensis Lapparent, 1960
Berriasian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Irhazer Group, Niger

Syntype- (MNNHN coll.; from In Tedreft) two anterior dorsal vertebrae (30 mm), two posterior dorsal vertebrae (33 mm), two sacral vertebrae, five mid-distal caudal vertebrae (50 mm), seven caudal vertebrae fragments, proximal tibia
Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Tegama Group, Niger

Syntypes- ?(MNNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) partial fourth sacral vertebra fused to fifth sacral vertebra (44 mm)
?(MNNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) proximal caudal centrum (40 mm)
?(MNNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) mid caudal vertebra (30 mm)
?(MNNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) distal caudal vertebra (12 mm)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Baharija Formation, Egypt

Referred- ?(IPHG 1912 VIII 63c) caudal vertebra (Stromer, 1934)
?(IPHG 1912 VIII 63e) caudal vertebra (Stromer, 1934)
?(IPHG 1912 VIII 63g) caudal vertebra (Stromer, 1934)
Comments- The associated individual from In Tedreft is the specimen Lapparent (1960) based Inosaurus' diagnosis and species name on, so should probably be made the lectotype if it is redescribed. He also based the taxon on three isolated caudals and a partial sacrum from In Abangarit. They were referred to Inosaurus because of their shorteness relative to their height. In addition, the mid caudal was said to "present some rather close characters" to the proximal caudal, while the sacral centrum proportions were said to be similar. Only the proximal caudal was illustrated. Finally, Lapparent found three caudals described by Stromer (1934) from the Baharija Formation to be similar, without further justification. The referral of the In Abangarit and Baharija specimens to a single taxon, let alone Inosaurus, is dubious.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharije-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 22, 1-79.
Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Memoirs of the Geological Society of France. 88A, 1-57.

"Katsuyamasaurus" Lambert, 1990
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Kitadani Formation of the Akaiwa Subgroup of the Tetori Group, Japan

Material- (unknown collection; Katsuyama-ryu) (~4 m) (?) mid caudal vertebra (68 mm), ulna (~200 mm)
Comments- This material was informally called "Katsuyama-ryu", as found in Azuma (1991). Lambert (1990) inappropriately made it into a genus name, listing it as "Katsuyamasaurus" in a childrens' book. Dong et al. (1990) published photos of the remains, labeling them Allosauridae indet.. They were later described by Chure (2000), who suggested the caudal may derive from an ornithopod. He noted it lacks lateral pleurofossae and was reminiscent of iguanodonts, which are known from the same quarry (Fukuisaurus, described by Kobayashi and Azuma, 2003). Olshevsky (DML, 2000) considered "Katsuyamasaurus" a likely junior synonym of Fukuiraptor, which was discovered later in the same quarry. However, the ulna differs from Fukuiraptor in being straight proximally, with a larger olecranon process and a more prominent and proximally projecting anteroproximal process. The large olecranon process excludes it from Maniraptoriformes, but more precise affinities within Theropoda are unknown at this time.
References- Dong, Hasegawa and Azuma, 1990. The Age of Dinosaurs in Japan and China. Fukui, Japan. Fukui Prefectural Museum. 65 pp.
Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book. New York, Avon Books. 320 pp.
Azuma, 1991. Early Cretaceous Dinosaur Fauna from the Tetori Group, central Japan. Research on Dinosaurs from the Tetori Group (1). Professor S. Miura Memorial Volume, 55-69.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Olshevsky, DML 2000. http://dml.cmnh.org/2000Dec/msg00399.html
Kobayashi and Azuma, 2003. A new iguanodontian (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Lower Cretaceous Kitadani Formation of Fukui Perfecture, Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23(1), 166-175.

Kelmayisaurus? "gigantus" Grady, 1993
Mesozoic
China
Material
- (22 m) complete axial column
Comments- This was mentioned by Grady (1993) in a popular book, as being an incomplete theropod axial column 22 meters long that is being worked on by Dong. Olshevsky (DML, 1995) stated he thought Grady had obtained the name Kelmayisaurus "gigantus" from one of Dale Russell's notebooks, but that Russell hadn't heard of it. If accurate, its length would be greater than any described theropod. However, the lack of description and illustration (making this a nomen nudum) makes the claim highly dubious, and it may be a mistake or a misidentified sauropod instead. Unfortunately, there has been no new information on the specimen.
References- Grady, 1993. The Dinosaur Project: The Story of the Greatest Dinosaur Expedition Ever Mounted. Edmonton: Ex Terra Foundation. Toronto: Macfarlane Walter & Ross. 61 pp.
Olshevsky, DML 1995. http://dml.cmnh.org/1995Sep/msg00668.html

"Labrosaurus" "huene" Huene vide Madsen and Welles, 2000
Late Jurassic
Szechuan, China
Material
- tooth
Comments- Madsen and Welles (2000) state this was a nomen nudum based on a tooth from the Jurassic of Szechuan mentioned by Huene (1956) on page 481, and later listed by him (1958; p. 205) as a nomen nudum.
However, the only thing Huene says about Labrosaurus in his 1956 paper is, "Labrosaurus Marsh Teeth, Grooves similar to Ceratosaurus from the Upper Jurassic of Wyoming, of Tendaguru and from Szechuan." This is on the very bottom of page 481, with "Huene, Palaeontologie" in smaller type below, which repeats every eight pages in the volume presumably to separate it into regular sections. Similarly, in his 1958 paper, Huene only mentions Labrosaurus on page 205, where he lists "Labrosaurus Marsh Upper Jurassic Szechuan, China" in his list of coelurosaurs. Thus Huene did not name Labrosaurus "huene", but did refer to Labrosaurus teeth from Szechuan. Chure (2000) states that Huene includes Szechuan in the distribution of Labrosaurus, "an apparent reference to medially ridged teeth described by Young (1942)." Young only mentions Labrosaurus stechowi on page 299, to compare it to Chienkosaurus, noting the latter lacks lingual fluting. Chienkosaurus and Szechuanosaurus are both listed separately by Huene, so he did not intend to sink either into Labrosaurus. Perhaps Huene was referring to fluted teeth from Szechuan (which could be ceratosaurid) or perhaps it was a mistake. It is clear that the species "huene" was a mistake by Madsen and Welles (2000) and never intended as a valid species by anyone.
References- Young, 1942. Fossil vertebrates from Kuangyuan, N. Szechuan, China. Bulletin of the Geological Society of China. 22(3-4), 293-309.
Huene, 1956. Palaontologie und Phylogenie der Niederen Tetrapoden. Jena, Gustav Fischer, 716 pp.
Huene, 1958. Pre-Tertiary saurians of China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 2(4), 201-207.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Madsen and Welles, 2000. Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) a revised osteology. Miscellaneous Publication 00-2 Utah Geological Survey. 80 pp.

"Megalosaurus" dunkeri Dames, 1884
= Prodeinodon dunkeri (Dames, 1884) Ruiz-Omenaca and Canudo, 2003
Berriasian, Early Cretaceous
Obernkirchen Sandstein, Germany

Holotype- (UM 84; lost) tooth (60x22x? mm)
Comments- Naish (2011) reports the holotype is lost.
This species is based on a single tooth described by Dames (1884) and illustrated by Koken (1887), initially distinguished from Megalosaurus bucklandii in being more transversely compressed and lacking mesial serrations.
Note abundant additional material was referred to Megalosaurus dunkeri by Dollo (1909) and Lydekker (1888), then Altispinax dunkeri by Huene (1926), but has not been described in detail so cannot be compared to the holotypes of either. BMNH 2559 and 2661 became the holotype and referred specimen of Megalosaurus oweni (Lydekker, 1889 and 1890 respectively), eventually separated as Valdoraptor. Most influential has been Huene's (1923) proposal of the genus Altispinax for "the species described as M. dunkeri by Lydekker (Dames)" ... "distinguished from Megalosaurus by its enormously high neural spines in the dorsal region" (referencing three high-spined dorsal vertebrae catalogued as BMNH R1828), which was misunderstood by future authors as proposing a new genus for Dames' (1884) Megalosaurus dunkeri. After decades of both tooth and vertebrae being called Altispinax dunkeri, Paul (1888) formally separated the vertebrae as the species altispinax, resulting in the recent consensus of Altispinax dunkeri for the tooth and Olshevsky's 1991 new combination Becklespinax altispinax for the vertebrae. The issue was resolved by Maisch (2016), who found the ICZN supported Altispinax dunkeri Huene, 1923 as a taxon based on vertebrae different from Megalosaurus dunkeri Dames, 1884 based on the tooth (see Altispinax entry for details). Thus the German tooth is the only specimen that can be referred to Megalosaurus dunkeri. The Hastings Beds specimens contemporaneous with Altispinax are listed under that entry, while the Weald Clay (Belgium, England) and Lower Greensand (England) material is listed as Neotheropoda here. Osi et al. (2010) referred two additional teeth from the Weald Clay.
Osi et al. (2010) found dunkeri to clade with "Megalosaurus" pannoniensis in a morphometric study, particularly when crown angle was compared to FABL. However, this was based on three teeth from the Weald Clay of England, not the holotype. Ruiz-Omenaca and Canudo (2003) proposed dunkeri was a species of Prodeinodon based on the false conclusion the mesial carina of the latter genus is unserrated, but it is actually serrated in both holotype and paratype (pers. obs.). The lack of mesial serrations in dunkeri may itself be due to wear.
References- Dames, 1884. Vorlegung eines Zahnes von Megalosaurus aus dem Wealden des Deisters. Sitzungsberichte der Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde zu Berlin. 1884, 186-188.
Koken, 1887. Die Dinosaurier, Crocodiliden und Sauropterygier des norddeutschen Wealden. Palaeontologische Abhandlungen. 3(5), 311-419.
Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Lydekker, 1889. On the remains and affinities of five genera of Mesozoic reptiles. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 45, 41-59.
Lydekker, 1890. Contributions to our knowledge of the dinosaurs of the Wealden and the sauropterygians of the Purbeck and Oxford Clay. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 46, 36-53.
Dollo, 1909. The fossil vertebrates of Belgium. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 19(4), 99-119.
Huene, 1923. Carnivorous Saurischia in Europe since the Triassic. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America. 34, 449-458.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York. 464 pp.
Olshevsky, 1991. A revision of the parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, excluding the advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Ruiz-Omenaca and Canudo, 2003. A new theropod dinosaur ("Prodeinodon" sp.) from the Lower Cretaceous of La Cantalera (Teruel, Spain). Geogaceta. 34, 111-114.
Osi, Apesteguia and Kowalewski, 2010. Non-avian theropod dinosaurs from the early Late Cretaceous of Central Europe. Cretaceous Research. 31(3), 304-320.
Naish, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs. In Batten (ed.). English Wealden Fossils. The Palaeontological Association. 526-559.
Maisch, 2016. The nomenclatural status of the carnivorous dinosaur genus Altispinax v. Huene, 1923 (Saurischia, Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of England. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen, 280(2), 215-219.

"Megalosaurus" insignis Eudes-Delongchamps and Lennier vide Lennier, 1870
= Streptospondylus insignis (Eudes-Deslongchamps and Lennier vide Lennier, 1870) Depéret and Savornin, 1928
= Erectopus insignis (Eudes-Deslongchamps and Lennier vide Lennier, 1870) Stromer, 1931
Early Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Saint-Adresse, Cap de La Hève, Haute-Normandie, France
Holotype- (Museum du Havre coll.) partial tooth (~120 mm)
Comments- The holotype tooth was first reported by Valenciennes (1863) as a megalosaur, then described as Megalosaurus insignis by Lennier (1870) and illustrated in Lennier (1887).
Sauvage (1874) referred four teeth from Fort de la Crèche (Musée de Boulogne coll.), three teeth from Portel (Beaugrand coll.), a sacral fragment and pedal ungual from Châtillon (Musée de Boulogne coll.) to Megalosaurus insignis. Lennier (1887) referred a pedal phalanx and pedal ungual (both Museum du Havre coll.), but these are sauropodan (Carrano et al., 2012). He also referred another supposed pedal phalanx (Museum du Havre coll.) and osteoderm (Poulain coll.), which are probably not theropod. Lydekker (1888) referred a tooth (BMNH 46388) from the Kimmeridge Clay and another (BMNH 35553a) from Ningle. Parent (1893) referred a pedal ungual (Lille Natural History Museum coll.) from Wimereux. Sauvage (1894) referred a pedal phalanx from Châtillon (Musée de Boulogne coll.), a tooth (Beaugrand coll.) from Moulin-Wibert, teeth from Mont-Lambert, teeth from Wimille, and remains from Pembel. Sauvage (1898) referred a tooth from the Oxfordian of Portugal. Lapparent (1943) referred seven teeth (MNHN coll.) from the Solvay Company quarry. Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957) referred numerous specimens (mostly in the Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.) from the Callovian-Tithonian of Portugal to M. insignis (including the holotype of Morosaurus marchei), much of the postcrania of which may not be theropod, with at least one caudal series being teleosaurian. As none of the theropod remains have been justified with shared derived characters, and the postcrania cannot be compared to the holotype, all of the material is here removed as Neotheropoda indet. pending further study.
References- Valenciennes, 1863. D'une espèce de Chélonien fossile d'un genre nouveau, trouvé dans la craie du cap la Hève par M. Lennier, du Havre, et décrit par M. A. Valenciennes [On a species of fossil chelonian of a new genus, found in the chalk of Cape Hève by Mr. Lennier, of Havre, and described by Mr. A. Valenciennes]. Compte Rendu des Séances de l'Académie des Sciences. 46(8), 317-322.
Lennier, 1870. Études Géologiques et Paléontologiques sur l'Embouchure de la Seine et les Falaises de la Haute-Normandie [Geological and Paleontological Studies on the Mouth of the Seine and the Cliffs of Haute-Normandie]. Imprimerie Eugène Costey, Havre. 1-245.
Sauvage, 1874. Mémoire sur les dinosauriens et les crocodiliens des terrains jurassiques de Boulogne-sur-Mer [Memoir on the dinosaurs and crocodilians of the Jurassic deposits of Boulogne-sur-mer]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 2. 10(2), 1-57.
Lennier, 1887. Études paléontologiques. Description des fossiles du Cap de la Hève. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de Normandie. 12, 17-98.
Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Parent, 1893. Le Wealdien du Bas-Boulonnais. Annales de la Societe Geologique du Nord. 21, 50-91.
Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.
Sauvage, 1898. Les Reptiles et les Poissons des terrains Mésozoïques du Portugal [The reptiles and fishes from the Mesozoic terrains of Portugal]. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e série. 26, 442-446.
Huene, 1926a. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata. 29, 35-167.
Depéret and Savornin, 1928. La faune de Reptiles et de Poissons albiens de Timimoun (Sahara algérien) [The Albian reptile and fish fauna of Timimoun (Algerian Sahara)]. Bulletin de la Societé Géologique de France, 4e série. 27, 257-265.
Stromer, 1931. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltier-Reste der Baharîjestufe (unterstes Cenoman). 10. Ein Skelett-Rest von Carcharodontosaurus nov. gen. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 9, 1-23.
Lapparent, 1943. Les dinosauriens jurassiques de Damparis (Jura) [The Jurassic dinosaurs of Damparis (Jura)]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France (Nouvelle Série). Mémoire 21(47), 1-21.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.
Mateus, 1999. Upper Jurassic dinosaurs from Lourinhã and Portuguese dinosaur - with review of collecting in Laos. Geologisk Tidskrift. 1, 33-32.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

"Megalosaurus" lonzeensis Dollo, 1903
= Ornithomimus lonzeensis (Dollo, 1903) Kuhn, 1965
= Struthiomimus lonzeensis (Dollo, 1903) Glut, 1997
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Glauconite of Lonzee, Belgium
Holotype
- (Musée royal d'histoire naturelle de Belgique coll.) ungual
Comments- Dollo (1883) originally distinguished this ungual from a supposed Megalosaurus ungual from the Weald Clay because it had a less concave proximal articulation with a reduced median ridge, and lacked ventral striations. Although some authors such as Russell (1972) and Molnar (1990) have stated Dollo named the species in his 1883 paper describing the holotype, he only referred to it as the "dinosaurien carnivore de Lonzee". He later (1903) named it as a new species of Megalosaurus, M. lonzeensis. Huene (1923) considered the specimen an ornithomimid without specifying why, labeling it Ornithomim.gen.Belgium in his phylogram. In 1926, Huene referred to the taxon as Ornithomimidorum gen. A, which has been interpreted as a genus name by some authors (e.g. Glut, 1997). Yet it is only the Latinized way of saying "ornithomimid genus A", to indicate Huene thought a new ornithomimid genus was necessary for lonzeensis, but did not wish to name it. Kuhn (1965) formally transferred the species to Ornithomimus. Russell (1972) considered Megalosaurus lonzeensis an indeterminate possible ornithomimid, but without published reasons. Molnar (1989 pers. comm. to Glut, 1997) believed it was not an ornithomimid, however. Glut (1997) incorrectly stated the species had been renamed ?Struthiomimus lonzeensis, but that combination doesn't appear in any prior work. Carrano et al. (2012) considered it a coelurosaur manual ungual based on "small size, mediolaterally narrow dimensions and details of the vascular traces."
If the specimen is a pedal ungual, it is most probably from a basal coelurosaur or paravian, as other theropods have pedal unguals which are less curved and broader. Among manual unguals, it resembles Masiakasaurus most closely, as other theropods' are generally deeper and more strongly curved. Of Carrano et al.'s coelurosaur-like features, noasaurids are also small and have mediolaterally compressed unguals (though the amount has not been reported), though the blood groove is deeper proximally and more ventral distally in Masiakasaurus. Traditional megalosaurids like Poekilopleuron and Dubreuillosaurus are similar to other theropods in these aspects. Ornithomimosaur pedal unguals are straight and broader, and further differ in having lateral and medial 'spurs' instead of a flexor tubercle. Ornithomimosaur manual unguals differ in having a distally placed flexor tubercle (except the deep, highly curved unguals of Deinocheirus). They are also characteristic in having a transversely expanded area ventral to the vascular grooves which ends far from the proximal end of the ungual. This is not seen in "Megalosaurus" lonzeensis. These comparisons indicate the taxon is neither a basal tetanurine nor an ornithomimosaur, but may be a noasaurid manual ungual or a deinonychosaur pedal ungual III or IV.
References- Dollo, 1883. Note sur les restes de dinosauriens rencontrés dans le Crétacé supérieur de la Belgique [Note on the dinosaur remains found in the Upper Cretaceous of Belgium]. Bulletin du Musée Royal d'Histoire Naturelle de Belgique. 2, 205-221.
Dollo, 1903. Les dinosauriens de la Belgique. Comptes Rendus de l' Académie des Sciences de Paris. 136, 565-567.
Huene, 1923. Carnivorous Saurischia in Europe since the Triassic. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America. 34, 449-458.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous Formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.
Kuhn, 1965. Saurischia (Supplementum 1). In Fossilium Catalogus 1. Animalia. 109, 1-94.
Russell, 1972. Ostrich dinosaurs of the Late Cretaceous of Western Canada. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 9, 375-402.
Molnar, 1990. Problematic Theropoda: "Carnosaurs". In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford. 306-317.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076 pp.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

Megalosaurus? monasterii (Muenster, 1836) Windolf, 1997
= Saurocephalus monasterii Muenster, 1836
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Korallenkalk Formation, Hanover, Germany
Holotype
- tooth
Comments- Originally referred to the saurodontid fish genus Saurocephalus by Muenster (1846), Windolf (1997, 1998) recognized it as theropod and used the new combination Megalosaurus monasterii. Carrano et al. (2012) stated the tooth could not be identified past Theropoda indet..
References- Muenster, 1836. Ueber die im Korallenkalk das Lindner Berges bei Hannover vorkommenden Ueberreste von Fischen, mit Beschreibung und Abbildung einiger neuen Arten [On the remains of fishes occurring in the Coral Chalk of Lindner Mountain in Hannover, with description and images of some new forms]. in Muenster and Wissman (eds.). Beitrage zur Petrefacten-Kunde. 7, 36-50.
Windolf, 1997. Theropoden-Zahne aus dem Oberen Jura Niedersachsens [Theropod teeth from the Upper Jurassic of Niedersachsen]. In Sachs, Rauhut and Weigert (eds.). Terra Nostra. 1. Treffen der deutschsprachigen Paläoherpetologen. Extended Abstracts. Duesseldorf, Germany. 33-34.
Windolf, 1998. Dinosaurierfunde in Niedersachsen [Dinosaur finds in Lower Saxony]. Arbeitskreis Paläontologie Hannover. 26, 1-7.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

"Megalosaurus" pombali Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Pombal, Leiria, Portugal
Syntype
- (Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.?; suggested lectotype) incomplete tooth
Middle-Late Jurassic
Ribamar, Portugal
Syntype
- ?(Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.?) tooth
Late Kimmeridgian-Early Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Lourinha Formation, Portugal
Syntype
- ?(Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.?) incomplete tooth (~110 mm)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Torrinha (Batalha), Portugal
Syntype
- ?(Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.?) anterior dorsal vertebra (90 mm)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Porto de Barcas, Lisboa, Portugal

Syntypes- ?(Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.) partial anterior dorsal vertebra (85 mm), partial proximal caudal vertebra (75 mm)
?(Torres Vedras Museum coll.) posterior dorsal vertebra (130 mm)
?(Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.) two mid caudal vertebrae (160 mm), mid caudal vertebra (130 mm), two mid caudal vertebrae (120, 130 mm)
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Albergaria, Leiria, Portugal

Syntype- ?(Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.?) distal caudal vertebra (135 mm)
Comments- Megalosaurus pombali was founded on several different specimens from numerous localities in Middle-Late Jurassic Portugal. Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957) distinguished it from M. insignis by its larger size (untrue), greater labiolingual thickness, and mesial carina restricted to the apical third. The vertebrae are supposedly united by their strong transverse and ventral constriction. As these characters have yet to be compared to the wide variety of generic neotheropod teeth now known, they are unlikely to be diagnostic, and the remains could be from multiple taxa. No lectotype has been selected, but the tooth from Pombal is the obvious choice given the tooth-based diagnosis and the species' etymology.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

Megalosaurus? "tibetensis" Zhao, 1985
Early Jurassic
Middle Daye Group, Tibet, China

Comments- This specimen was first reported by Zhao (1983) who while discussing the evolution of dinosaurs in China noted "primitive carnosaurs (Megalosaurus Buckland)" in the Early Jurassic. It might be surmised Zhao was referring to an undescribed Chinese specimen of Megalosaurus, which is strengthened by the later mention of a new Megalosaurus species from the same deposits as other Early Jurassic taxa Zhao mentions (Lufengosaurus? "changduensis", "Damalasaurus", ?Scelidosaurus). As with other new Tibetan taxa listed by Zhao (1983), it was probably supposed to be described by Zhao in the published version of his doctoral dissertation "The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China", in the second Palaeontology of Xizang volume. Yet this volume is only referenced by Zhao (1983; which was submitted in September 1981) and seems never to have been printed, though the previous volume was published by the IVPP in 1980 and the third by the NIGP in 1981. Olshevsky (DML, 1999) notes the IVPP rejected the paper as unpublishable. Zhao (1985) and Zhao and Cheng (1985) list the new species Megalosaurus tibetensis from the Early Jurassic Middle Daye Group of Qamdo, Tibet. It is listed as undescribed ?megalosaurid from the Early Jurassic Daye Group of Xizang Zizhiqu by Weishampel (1990). Zhang and Li (1997) list this theropod as being from the Middle Daye Formation of Daye, Qamdo County, Xizang. The Daye Formation itself seems to be Early Triassic, so a referral to a Daye Group seems more likely. Weishampel et al. (2004) list it as undescribed theropod from the Daye Group of Xizang. It is listed as the megalosaurid Megalosaurus tibetensis Zhao sp. nov. (MS) in Fang et al. (2006), suggesting Zhao's monograph was indeed never published and is still a manuscript. It is probably not referrable to Megalosaurus based on the older age, but has not been described or figured so remains a nomen nudum.
References- Zhao, "1983" [unpublished]. The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China. The Series of the Scientific Expeditions to the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Palaeontology of Xizang. 2, 1-200.
Zhao, 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 28(1-2), 295-306.
Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Zhao and Cheng, 1985. The Qamdo-Simao Subregion. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 174-179.
Weishampel, 1990. Dinosaurian distribution. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press. 63-139.
Zhang and Li, 1997. Mesozoic Dinosaur Localities in China and Their Stratigraphy. In Wolberg, Sump and Rosenberg (eds.). Dinofest International, Proceedings of a Symposium sponsered by Arizona State University. A Publication of The Academy of Natural Sciences. 265-273.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 517-606.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

"Morosaurus" marchei Sauvage, 1898
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Ourem, Santarem, Portugal

Holotype- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) distal caudal vertebra (90 mm)
Comments- Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957) refer the holotype to Megalosaurus insignis, though a referred tooth is sauropod. However, it cannot be compared to the holotype of M. insignis and may not be theropod either.
References- Sauvage, 1897-1898. Vertebres Fossiles du Portugual, Contributions a l'etude des poissions et des reptiles du Jurassique et du Cretaceous. Direction des Travaux Geologiques Portugal. 1-46.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

"Ornithocheirus" hilsensis Koken, 1883
Berriasian, Early Cretaceous
Obernkirchen Sandstein, Germany
Holotype
- distal pedal phalanx II-2 (~105-145 mm)
Diagnosis- Indeterminate within Neotheropoda.
Comments- Koken (1883) originally identified this as a distal metacarpal IV belonging to the pterosaur genus Ornithocheirus. Meyer and Dames (1884) disagreed, noting that in pterosaurs the distal condyles are much larger than the shaft and that the sides do not have ligament pits. Meyer further believed "O." hilsensis' bone was pneumatic, which he viewed as similar to theropods. Koken and Kayser (1885) replied, stating the morphology could still be congruent with a pterosaurian identity. Williston (1885, 1886) firmly supported a theropod identity, based on his observations of material at the YPM.
Based on Koken's (1883) figure, the specimen is the distal half of a theropod left pedal phalanx II-2. It is 59 mm long as preserved, probably ~105-145 mm when complete based on proportions in other taxa. It is 32.3 mm broad with condyles 37 mm tall. The articular surface is deeply ginglymoid, with both extensor and flexor grooves, the latter more extensive. There is a slight extensor pit. The lateral condyle is broader than the medial condyle and slightly higher in distal view, though both are equal in distal and ventral extent. The condyles are more pointed dorsodistally than ventrodistally and possess large ligament pits on both sides.
It can be identified as pedal phalanx II-1 because other phalanges are either more transversely flared distally (making their distal profiles wide) and/or more stout. Mayer and Dames were correct to note it strongly differs from pterosaurs such as Pteranodon in having smaller condyles which have prominant ligament pits. These condyles are also slightly dorsally displaced, unlike the strongly ventrally displaced condyles in Pteranodon. It is extremely similar to such taxa as Majungasaurus and Neovenator. The size is much larger than nearly all coelurosaurs except tyrannosauroids, meaning it is unlikely to belong to this clade, and it does not show the dorsally displaced ligament pits of dromaeosaurids. It may be from any variety of large theropod (neoceratosaur, spinosauroid, carnosaur, tyrannosauroid) and shows no distinctive characteristics, leaving it a nomen dubium.
References- Koken, 1883. Die Reptilien der norddeutschen unteren Kreide. Zeitschrift der deutschen Geologischen Gesellshaft. 35, 735-827.
Meyer and Dames, 1884. Ueber Ornithocheirus hilsensis Koken und über Zirkonzwillinge. Zeitschrift der deutschen Geologischen Gesellshaft. 36, 664-665.
Koken and Kayser, 1885. Über Ornithocheirus hilsensis, Koken. Zeitschrift der deutschen Geologischen Gesellshaft. 37, 214-215.
Williston, 1885. Uber Ornithocheirus hilsensis, Koken. Zoologischer Anzeiger. 8, 628-629.
Koken, 1886. Ueber Ornithocheirus hilsensis Koken. Zoologischer Anzeiger. 9, 21-23.
Williston, 1886. Über Ornithocheirus hilsensis Koken. Zoologischer Anzeiger. 9, 282-283.
Dames, 1886. [Comments on Meyer and Dames 1884, Koken and Kayser 1885, Williston 1885, Koken 1886 and Williston 1886]. Neues Jahrbuch fur Mineralogie, Geologie und Palaeontologie. 1886(3), 113-114.

Orthogoniosaurus Das-Gupta, 1931
O. matleyi Das-Gupta, 1931
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Lameta Formation, India

Holotype- (GI coll.) posterior tooth
Comments- The type tooth of Orthogoniosaurus matleyi was discovered in 1924.
References- Das-Gupta, 1931. On a new theropod dinosaur (Orthogoniosaurus matleyi, n. gen. et n. sp.) from the Lameta beds of Jubbulpore. Journal and Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. 26, 367-369.
Huene and Matley, 1933. The Cretaceous Saurischia and Ornithischia of the Central Provinces of India. Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India. Palaeontologica Indica. 21, 1-72.
Romer, 1956. Osteology of the Reptiles. University of Chicago Press. 772 pp.
Walker, 1964. Triassic reptiles from the Elgin area: Ornithosuchus and the origin of carnosaurs. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B, Biological Sciences. 248, 53-134.
Romer, 1966. Vertebrate Paleontology, 3rd edition. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. 468 pp.
Molnar, 1990. Problematic Theropoda: "Carnosaurs". in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford. 306-317.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076 pp.
Tykoski and Rowe, 2004. Ceratosauria. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press, Berkeley. 47-70.

Orthogoniosaurus? rawesi (Lydekker, 1890) Olshevsky, 1991
= Massospondylus rawesi Lydekker, 1890
= Megalosaurus rawesi (Lydekker, 1890) Vianey-Liaud, Jain and Sahni, 1987
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Takli Formation, India

Holotype- (BMNH R4190) tooth
Comments- Considered non-dinosaurian by Galton (pers. comm. to Glut, 1989, in Glut 1997). However, Carrano et al. (2012) considered it theropod and noted the fine serrations and stout proportions resembled abelisaurids.
References- Lydekker, 1890. Note on certain vertebrate remains from the Nagpur District. Records of the Geological Survey of India. 23, 20-24.
Vianey-Liaud, Jain and Sahni, 1987. Dinosaur eggshells (Saurischia) from the Late Cretaceous intertrappeans and Lameta Formation (Deccan, India). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 7(4), 408-424.
Olshevsky, 1991. A revision of the parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, excluding the advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076 pp.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

Ozraptor Long and Molnar, 1998
= "Austroraptor" Pigdon, DML 1997
O. subotaii Long and Molnar, 1998
Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Colalura Sandstone, Western Australia, Australia

Holotype- (UWA 82469) (~1.6-2 m) distal tibia (~170-200 mm, 40 mm wide)
Other diagnoses- The diagnostic characters listed by Long and Molnar (1998) (high rectangular ascending process with straight dorsal margin; centrally placed vertical ridge in astragalar facet; weakly developed medial condyle) are also found inar least Velocisaurus and Austrocheirus. However, differences in the extent and width of the central ridge and other features may provide a valid diagnosis with further study.
Comments- This was originally found in 1967 and identified as chelonian by the BMNH. It was later repared and reidentified as theropod by Long in 1990s. Rauhut (2005) noted Ozraptor shared a centrally placed vertical ridge in the astragalar facet with unnamed Tendaguru abelisauroid MB R 1750, so referred it to that clade. More recently, Rauhut (2012) found that non-ceratosaurs such as Chuandongocoelurus, Aerosteon and Juratyrant also have well-developed ridges, with fainter ridges present in several coelurosaurs. Furthermore, Rajasaurus, Majungasaurus, Pycnonemosaurus, Quilmesaurus and Masiakasaurus lack the ridge, leaving it only known in Velocisaurus and Austrocheirus among named ceratosaurs. Rauhut (2012) placed Ozraptor in Theropoda indet., but here it is in Neotheropoda incertae sedis pending further study, as no non-neotheropods survived until the Middle Jurassic or have tall astragalar ascending processes.
References- http://dml.cmnh.org/1997Sep/msg00942.html
Long and Molnar, 1998. A new Jurassic theropod dinosaur from Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum. 19(1), 221-229.
Rauhut, 2005. Post-cranial remains of 'coelurosaurs' (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Tanzania. Geological Magazine. 142(1), 97-107.
Ezcurra and Agnolin, 2012. An abelisauroid dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Laurasia and its implications on theropod palaeobiogeography and evolution. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 123(3), 500-507.
Rauhut, 2012. A reappraisal of a putative record of abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of England. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 123(5), 779-786.

"Prodeinodon" kwangshiensis Hou, Yeh and Zhao, 1975
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Xinlong Formation, Guangxi, China

Syntypes- (IVPP V4795) tooth (73x28x13 mm), three teeth
Referred- ?(NP01) tooth (Amoit et al., 2010)
?(NP02) tooth (Amoit et al., 2010)
?(NP06) tooth (Amoit et al., 2010)
? teeth (Mo et al., 2015)
Comments- This taxon was discovered in 1973 and described as a new species of Prodeinodon by Hou et al. (1975), though the paper has yet to be translated from Chinese. Thus the rationale for referring kwangshiensis to Prodeinodon, the purported diagnostic characters, and the descriptive details remain unknown to Western authors. Note the Xinlong Formation used to be called the Napai Formation (Mo et al., 2015). One of the four teeth described by Hou et al. is ~25-45% larger than the others, so may belong to a different individual and make the hypodigm more correctly termed syntypes than a holotype. Okazaki (1992) proposed kwangshiensis might be referrable to Wakinosaurus based on the high labiolingual compression and rather straight distal edge. Mo et al. (2014) noted kwangshiensis differs from the Xinlong carcharodontosaurid tooth NHMG 10858 in being smaller, more elongate (height/FABL ratio 2.61 vs. 1.92), having apically angled distal serrations, and lacking longitudinal ridges along the distal edge. Yet the size and elongation are more variable in e.g. Tyrannosaurus, so these may not be important factors. Mo et al. (2015) stated "teeth generally similar to those described by Hou, Yeh & Zhao (1975) are fairly common in the Xinlong Formation", illustrating an example as a carcharodontosaurid. kwangshiensis may end up being a carcharodontosaurid, and/or could be synonymous with Datanglong from the same formation.
References- Hou, Yeh and Zhao, 1975. Fossil reptiles from Fusui, Kwangshi. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 13(1), 24-33.
Okazaki, 1992. A new genus and species of carnivorous dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Kwanmon Group, northern Kyusyu. Bulletin of the Kitakyushu Museum of Natural History 11, 87-90.
Amiot, Buffetaut, Lecuyer, Wang, Boudad, Ding, Fourel, Hutt, Martineau, Medeiros, Mo, Simon, Suteethorn, Sweetman, Tong, Zhang and Zhou, 2010. Oxygen isotope evidence for semiaquatic habits among spinosaurid theropods. Geology. 38, 139-142.
Mo, Huang, Xie and Buffetaut, 2014. A megatheropod tooth from the Early Cretaceous of Fusui, Guangxi, Southern China. Acta Geologica Sinica (English Edition). 88(1), 6-12.
Mo, Buffetaut, Tong, Amiot, Cavin, Cuny, Suteethorn, Suteethorn and Jiang, 2015. Early Cretaceous vertebrates from the Xinlong Formation of Guangxi (southern China): A review. Geological Magazine. doi:10.1017/S0016756815000394

Prodeinodon Osborn, 1924
P. mongoliensis Osborn, 1924
Early Cretaceous
Huhteeg Svita (=Oshih Formation), Mongolia

Holotype- (AMNH 6265) partial tooth
Paratype- (AMNH 6531) tooth (47 mm)
Referred- ? maxillary tooth, fragmentary tibia (~1 m; lost), fragmentary fibula (~1 m; lost) (Bohlin, 1953)
References- Osborn, 1924. Sauropoda and Theropoda of the Lower Cretaceous of Mongolia. American Museum Novitates. 128, 1-7.
Bohlin, 1953. Fossil reptiles from Mongolia and Kansu. Reports from the Scientific Expedition to the North-Western Provinces of China Under Leadership of Dr Sven Hedin. The Sino-Swedish Expedition. Publication 37(6), 113 pp.

"Scrotum" Brookes, 1763
"S. humanum" Brookes, 1763
Late Bajocian-Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
oolitic limestones of Cornwell, England

Material- (lost) distal femur
Comments- Originally described and illustrated by Plot (1677). Brookes (1793) later applied the name "Scrotum humanum" to the specimen, although probably not intending it as a Linnaean binomial. With the nomen oblitum clause of the ICZN no longer active, Halstead petitioned the ICZN to suppress the name in favor of Megalosaurus bucklandii. However, the ICZN felt that such action was uncessary since it is not necessarily a M. bucklandii specimen. Indeed, though often associated with Megalosaurus, there is no reason it couldn't be a contemporaneous form like Metriacanthosaurus instead.
References- Plot, 1677. The Natural History of Oxford-shire, being an essay towards the Natural History of England. Oxford. 358 pp.
Brookes, 1763. The Natural History of Waters, Earths, Stones, Fossils and Minerals, with their Virtues, Properties and Medicinal Use: To which is added, the methods in which Linnaeus has treated these subjects. Vol. 5. Newberry, London. 364 pp.
Halstead, 1970. Scrotum humanum Brookes 1763 - the first named dinosaur. Journal of Insignificant Research. 5, 14-15.
Halstead and Sarjeant, 1993. Scrotum humanum Brookes - the earliest name for a dinosaur? Modern Geology. 18, 220-224.

Szechuanosaurus Young, 1942
S. campi Young, 1942
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Kyangyan (Guangyuan) Series, Sichuan, China

Syntypes- (IVPP V235) two partial teeth
(IVPP V236) partial tooth
(IVPP V238) fragmentary teeth
(IVPP V239) tooth
Diagnosis- Provisionally indeterminate relative to at least Sinraptoridae.
Comments- The partial skeleton often referred to this species (Dong et al., 1983) has been found to belong to Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis by Carrano et al. (2012). Another fragmentary skeleton referred to the species (He, 1984) was found by Chure to be a basal tetanurine, and cannot be compared to the cotypes. The syntype teeth were collected from a wide area and may not belong to one taxon.
References- Young, 1942. Fossil vertebrates from Kuangyuan, N. Szechuan, China. Bulletin of the Geological Society of China. 22(3-4), 293-309.
Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983. Dinosaurs from the Jurassic of Sichuan. Palaeontologica Sinica. Whole Number 162, New Series C, 23, 136 pp.
He, 1984. The Vertebrate Fossils of Sichuan. Sichuan Scientific and Technical Publishing House, Chengdu, Sichuan. 168 pp.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.
S? sp. indet. (Young, 1963)
Late Jurassic
Tiekuling, Jiangxi, China

Material- (IVPP V2691) tooth
Reference- Young, 1963. Note on a new locality of dinosaurian remains from Taiho, Chiangsi, SE. China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 7(1), 48-51.
S? sp. indet. (Dong, 1977)
Late Jurassic
Huoyanshan Formation, Xinjiang, China

Material- (IVPP coll.) teeth
Comments- Contra Ford's Paleofile website, this material is not from Dong's 1979 paper, nor from the Xinminpa Formation, and does not include maxillary material.
Reference- Dong, 1977. On the dinosaurian remains from Turpan, Xinjiang. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 15(1), 59-66.
S? sp. indet. (Camp, 1935)
Cretaceous
Szechuan Beds, Szechuan, China

Material- (UCMP 32102) tooth (90 mm), ischial fragment, femoral fragment
Comments- Young (1942) referred this specimen to S. campi, but there is no reason for this assignment (Chure, 2000).
References- Camp, 1935. Dinosaur remains from the province of Szechuan. University of California Publications, Bulletin of the Department of Geological Sciences. 23(14), 467-471.
Young, 1942. Fossil vertebrates from Kuangyuan, N. Szechuan, China. Bulletin of the Geological Society of China. 22(3-4), 293-309.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
S? sp. indet. (Young, 1958)
Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Wangshi Group, Shantung, China

Material- (IVPP V756) tooth
(IVPP V757) tooth
(IVPP V758) tooth
(IVPP V759) tooth
(IVPP V760) tooth
(IVPP V761) tooth
(IVPP V764) tooth
(IVPP V765) tooth
(IVPP V766) tooth
(IVPP V783) tooth
(IVPP V784) tooth
(IVPP V785) tooth
Comments- Based on its age, these teeth are more likely tyrannosaurid or dromaeosaurid
Reference- Young, 1958. The dinosaurian remains of Liayang, Shantung. Palaeontologia Sincia. 142(16), 1-138.

Teinurosaurus Nopcsa 1928
= Saurornithoides Nopcsa, 1928 (preoccupied Osborn, 1924)
= Caudocoelus Huene, 1932
T. sauvagei (Nopcsa 1928) Olshevsky, 1978
= Saurornithoides sauvagei Nopcsa, 1928
= Caudocoelus sauvagei (Nopcsa, 1928) Huene, 1932
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
unnamed formation, France

Holotype- (MGB 500; destroyed) distal caudal vertebra (152 mm)
References- Nopcsa, 1928. The genera of reptiles. Palaeobiologica. 1, 163-188.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Olshevsky, 1978. The archosaurian taxa (excluding the Crocodylia). Mesozoic Meanderings. 1, 50 pp.

Wakinosaurus Okazaki, 1992
W. satoi Okazaki, 1992
Late Hauterivian, Early Cretaceous
Sengoku Formation of the Wakino Subgroup of the Kwanmon Group, Japan

Holotype- (KMNH VP 000,016) partial tooth (~70 mm)
Comments- Okazaki (1990) originally identified the holotype as Megalosauridae indet..
References- Okazaki, 1990. Discovery of dinosaur remain from the Kwanmon Group. Abstract of the Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Japan. 37
Okazaki, 1992. A new genus and species of carnivorous dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Kwanmon Group, Northern Kyushu. Bulletin of the Kitakyushu Museum of Natural History. 11, 87-90.

Walgettosuchus Huene, 1932
W. woodwardi Huene, 1932
= Megalosaurus woodwardi (Huene, 1932) Olshevsky, 1991
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Sandstone Member of the Griman Creek Formation, New South Wales, Australia

Holotype- (BMNH R3717) incomplete distal caudal vertebra (63 mm)
Comments- Huene (1932) compared the long prezygapophyses (based on the depth of their bases and the supposed posterior surface for them to articulate on) to Elaphrosaurus and Ornithomimus, both of which he viewed as coelurosaurs. He felt it "quite possible, if not probable" that Walgettosuchus was an ornithomimid. It has more recently been placed in Theropoda indet., as in Agnolin et al. (2010). As Elaphrosaurus is now considered a ceratosaur and only neotheropods are known from the Cretaceous, Walgettosuchus is here placed in Neotheropoda pending further study. While Olshevsky (1991) listed Megalosaurus woodwardi as a junior synonym, he included no responsible author, nor has an earlier work using that combination for the Walgettosuchus material (as opposed to European finds) been located.
References- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Olshevsky, 1991. A revision of the parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, excluding the advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Agnolin, Ezcurra, Pais and Salisbury, 2010. A reappraisal of the Cretaceous non-avian dinosaur faunas from Australia and New Zealand: Evidence for their Gondwanan affinities. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(2), 257-300.

Yangchuanosaurus? "longqiaoensis" Li, Zhang and Cai, 1999
Late Jurassic
Penglaizhen Formation, Sichuan, China

Comments- This is only published as a faunal listing, so it is unknown if the specimen is really referrable to Yangchuanosaurus.
Reference- Li, Zhang and Cai, 1999. The Characteristics of the Composition of the Trace Elements in Jurassic Dinosaur Bones and Red Beds in Sichuan Basin. Geological Publishing House, Beijing. 155 pp.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Mantell, 1927)
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Upper Weald Clay, England

Material- (BMNH 2141) posterior dorsal neural arch (Mantell, 1827)
(BMNH 2294) partial caudal vertebra (Lydekker, 1888)
....(BMNH 2295) partial caudal vertebra (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2315) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2332) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2482) pedal ungual (Mantell, 1827)
(BMNH 2501) pedal phalanx ?-1 (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2503) pedal phalanx III-2 (Mantell, 1827)
(BMNH 2513) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2553; cast) metacarpal (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2574) distal metatarsal III (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2680) metatarsal III (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 2828) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 3221) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 3222) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 3223-3224) four teeth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 3225) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 3333) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 3640) proximal pedal phalanx ?-1 (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 26012) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 28422) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 36495) partial metacarpal (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 36496) partial metacarpal (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 36551) proximal pedal phalanx ?-1 (Mantell, 1827)
(BMNH 36522) partial tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 36522a) three teeth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 36523) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 39197) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R235) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R1105) incomplete manual ungual ?III (Owen, 1857)
Comments- Most of this material was referred to Megalosaurus dunkeri by Lydekker (1888), then Altispinax dunkeri by Huene (1926), but has not been described in detail so cannot be compared to the holotypes of either. They may belong to Baryonyx, Altispinax, Valdoraptor, Neovenator, Calamosaurus, Eotyrannus or another Wealden theropod.BMNH 2141 and BMNH 2482 were initially illustrated as Iguanodon by Mantell (1827). BMNH R1105 and BMNH 2482 were described and illustrated by Owen (1857) as Megalosaurus bucklandii (plate X, fig. 1-4 and 5 respectively). BMNH R2559 was referred to M. dunkeri by Lydekker (1888), but was made the holotype of Megalosaurus oweni by the author the next year. BMNH 2574 and 2680 were referred to oweni by Lydekker (1890), though this has not been confirmed by recent studies. Note Ford (www.paleofile.com) mistyped BMNH 39197 as BMNH 39497, and BMNH 2513 as BMNH 35523.
References- Mantell, 1827. Illustrations of the Geology of Sussex: The Fossils of Tilgate Forest. Lupton Relfe, [pp].
Owen, 1857. Monograph on the Fossil Reptilia of the Wealden and Purbeck Formations. Part III. Dinosauria (Megalosaurus) (Wealden). Palaeontographical Society Monographs. 9, 1-26.
Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Lydekker, 1889. On the remains and affinities of five genera of Mesozoic reptiles. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 45, 41-59.
Lydekker, 1890. Contributions to our knowledge of the dinosaurs of the Wealden and the sauropterygians of the Purbeck and Oxford Clay. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 46, 36-53.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1874)
Middle Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Fort de la Crèche, Pas-de-Calais, France

Material- (Musée de Boulogne coll.) tooth (110 mm)
(Musée de Boulogne coll.) incomplete tooth (~70 mm)
(Musée de Boulogne coll.) incomplete tooth
(Musée de Boulogne coll.) tooth (>17 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis.
Reference- Sauvage, 1874. Mémoire sur les dinosauriens et les crocodiliens des terrains jurassiques de Boulogne-sur-Mer [Memoir on the dinosaurs and crocodilians of the Jurassic deposits of Boulogne-sur-mer]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 2. 10(2), 1-57.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1874)
Middle Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Portel, Boulogne, Pas-de-Calais, France

Material- (Beaugrand coll.) tooth (25 mm)
(Beaugrand coll.) tooth (~25 mm)
(Beaugrand coll.) tooth
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis.
Reference- Sauvage, 1874. Mémoire sur les dinosauriens et les crocodiliens des terrains jurassiques de Boulogne-sur-Mer [Memoir on the dinosaurs and crocodilians of the Jurassic deposits of Boulogne-sur-mer]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 2. 10(2), 1-57.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1874)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Châtillon, Pas-de-Calais, France

Material- (Musée de Boulogne coll.) two fused sacral centra
(Musée de Boulogne coll.) pedal ungual
(Musée de Boulogne coll.) pedal phalanx IV-?
Comments- The sacrals and ungual were referred to Megalosaurus insignis by Sauvage (1874). He referred a pedal phalanx to ?Iguanodon, but later (1894) reassigned it to M. insignis.
Reference- Sauvage, 1874. Mémoire sur les dinosauriens et les crocodiliens des terrains jurassiques de Boulogne-sur-Mer [Memoir on the dinosaurs and crocodilians of the Jurassic deposits of Boulogne-sur-mer]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 2. 10(2), 1-57.
Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Barrois, 1875)
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Grandpre, Ardennes, France

Material- (Musée de la Faculté des Sciences de Lille coll.) two teeth, centrum (65 mm) (Barrois, 1875)
(Peron coll.) distal fibula(?), distal metatarsal(?) (Sauvage, 1882b)
Comments- Barrois (1875) and Sauvage (1876) described two teeth and a centrum from Grandpre as Megalosaurus. Sauvage (1882b) referred the teeth to Megalosaurus superbus, and described a supposed distal metatarsal and proximal metapodial from Grandpre as also belonging to M. superbus. Huene (1926a, b) retained all of these in that species, which he had moved to the new genus Erectopus in 1923. He listed both limb bones as metatarsals on page 43, but on page 79 stated the proximal metapodial was a distal fibula. Huene (1932) later kept the teeth referred to superbus, while he kept the limb elements with the Erectopus type material as E. sauvagei. The illustrated tooth and limb bone fragment do not appear particularly diagnostic and may belong to any ceratosaur, basal tetanurine, carnosaur or basal coelurosaur. The centrum and supposed distal fibula may not even be theropodan.
References- Barrois, 1875. Les reptiles du terrain Crétacé du nord-est du Bassin de Paris. Bulletin scientifique, historique et littéraire du Nord. 6, 1-11.
Sauvage, 1876. Notes sur les reptiles fossiles no. 9. De la presence du type dinosaurien dans le Gault du nord de la France. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France. 4, 439-442.
Sauvage, 1882b. Recherches sur les reptiles trouvés dans le Gault de l'est du bassin de Paris [Research on the reptiles found in the Gault of the eastern Paris Basin]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 3. 2(4), 1-42.
Huene, 1926a. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata. 29, 35-167.
Huene. 1926b. On several known and unknown reptiles of the order Saurischia from England and France. Annals and Magazine of Natural History.17, 473-489.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), 361 pp.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Barrois, 1875)
Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Phosphate bearing beds of La Penthieve near Louppy-de-Chateau, Meuse, France
Material-
(Musée de la Faculté des Sciences de Lille coll.) tooth (Barrois, 1875)
(Pierson coll.) distal femur (Sauvage, 1882a)
Comments- Barrois (1875) and Sauvage (1876) described a tooth from Louppy-de-Chateau as Megalosaurus. Sauvage (1882a) briefly described a partial skeleton from there as a new species Megalosaurus superbus, referring a large distal femur found in the same area to the same taxon. He later (1882b) described both in more detail and indicated the tooth was also thought to be from that species. Huene (1926a, b) believed the distal femur to come from a different taxon of carnosaur from M. superbus, which he renamed Erectopus in 1923. Huene (1932) later kept the tooth referred to superbus. The tooth is typical of large theropods while the femur has never been illustrated, though both may indeed belong to Erectopus.
References- Barrois, 1875. Les reptiles du terrain Crétacé du nord-est du Bassin de Paris. Bulletin scientifique, historique et littéraire du Nord. 6, 1-11.
Sauvage, 1876. Notes sur les reptiles fossiles no. 9. De la presence du type dinosaurien dans le Gault du nord de la France. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France. 4, 439-442.
Sauvage, 1882a. Sur les Reptiles trouvés dans le gault de l'est de la France [On the reptiles found in the Gault of eastern France]. Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires des Seances de l'Académie des Sciences. 94, 1265-1266.
Sauvage, 1882b. Recherches sur les reptiles trouvés dans le Gault de l'est du bassin de Paris [Research on the reptiles found in the Gault of the eastern Paris Basin]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 3. 2(4), 1-42.
Huene, 1926a. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata. 29, 35-167.
Huene. 1926b. On several known and unknown reptiles of the order Saurischia from England and France. Annals and Magazine of Natural History.17, 473-489.

unnamed possible theropod (Seeley, 1876)
Late Albian, Early Cretaceous
Cambridge Greensand, England

Material- (SMC B55281) anterior sacrum
Comments- SMC B55281 was identified by Seeley (1876) as a partial sacrum of Enaliornis barretti, reidentified as a pterosaur notarium by Galton and Martin (2002a), then identified again as a possible theropod sacrum by Galton and Martin (2002b).
References- Seeley, 1876. On the British fossil Cretaceous birds. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 32, 496-515.
Galton and Martin, 2002a. Enaliornis, an Early Cretaceous hesperornithiform bird from England, with comments on other Hesperornithiformes. In Chiappe and Witmer (eds). Mesozoic birds: Above the heads of dinosaurs. Berkeley: University of California Press. 317-338.
Galton and Martin, 2002b. Postcranial anatomy and systematics of Enaliornis Seeley, 1876, a footpropelled diving bird (Aves: Ornithurae: Hesperornithiformes) from the Early Cretaceous of England. Revue de Paleobiologie. 21(2), 489-538.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1882b)
Early Cretaceous
Bar-le-Duc, Meuse, France

Material- (Pierson coll.) pedal phalanx II-1 (100 mm)
? (Pierson coll.) pedal phalanx (65 mm)
Comments- Sauvage (1882b) described two pedal phalanges as belonging to Erectopus superbus, specifying one came from Bar-le-Duc. Huene (1926a, b) retained that referral and listed both as deriving from that area. Chure (2000) states Huene (1926a) described this element as part of the type material, but the pedal phalanges Huene mentions in the type description are in figures 3.3 and 4.4 of Sauvage's paper (metacarpal I and pedal phalanx IV-?, both from the type), whereas this phalanx is in figure 4.3. The phalanges may belong to any large theropod, and are not comparable to Erectopus' type.
References- Sauvage, 1882b. Recherches sur les reptiles trouvés dans le Gault de l'est du bassin de Paris [Research on the reptiles found in the Gault of the eastern Paris Basin]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France, série 3. 2(4), 1-42.
Huene, 1926a. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata. 29, 35-167.
Huene. 1926b. On several known and unknown reptiles of the order Saurischia from England and France. Annals and Magazine of Natural History.17, 473-489.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.

undescribed neotheropod (Lydekker, 1888)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Kimmeridge Clay, Wiltshire, England

Material- (BMNH 46388) partial tooth
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but is neither described nor illustrated.
References- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Delair, 1973. The Dinosaurs of Wiltshire. Whiltshire Archaeology and Natural History Magazine. 68, 1-7.

undescribed neotheropod (Lydekker, 1888)
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Ningle, Pas-de-Calais, France

Material- (BMNH 35553a) tooth
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but is neither described nor illustrated.
Reference- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Lydekker, 1888)
Hauterivian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Weald Clay, England

Material- (BMNH 28958) partial posterior dorsal centrum (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 37691) dorsal centrum (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH 44806) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R139) two sacral fragments (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R141) dorsal centrum (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R210) tooth (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R1997) tooth (Osi et al., 2010)
(BMNH R15909) tooth (Osi et al., 2010)
Comments- Most of this material was referred to Megalosaurus dunkeri by Lydekker (1888), then Altispinax dunkeri by Huene (1926), but has not been described in detail so cannot be compared to the holotypes of either. They may belong to Baryonyx, Altispinax, Valdoraptor, Neovenator, Calamosaurus, Eotyrannus or another Wealden theropod. Osi et al. (2010) described two additional supposed Megalosaurus dunkeri teeth, finding them and BMNH R210 to clade with "Megalosaurus" pannoniensis in a morphometric study, but these are all from the Weald Clay of England, so may not belong to dunkeri in the first place.
References- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.
Osi, Apesteguia and Kowalewski, 2010. Non-avian theropod dinosaurs from the early Late Cretaceous of Central Europe. Cretaceous Research. 31(3), 304-320.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Lydekker, 1888)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Lower Greensand, England

Material- (BMNH 40455) partial distal caudal vertebra
(BMNH 42032) dorsal centrum
Comments- This material was referred to Megalosaurus dunkeri by Lydekker (1888), then Altispinax dunkeri by Huene (1926), but has not been described and is probably too late to be either species.
References- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.

unnamed neotheropod (Parent, 1893)
Early Cretaceous
Wealden Group(?), Wimereux, Pas-de-Calais, France

Material- (Lille Natural History Museum coll.) pedal ungual (~100 mm), elements
Comments- Parent (1893) and Sauvage (1894) both referred this ungual to Megalosaurus insignis.
References- Parent, 1893. Le Wealdien du Bas-Boulonnais. Annales de la Societe Geologique du Nord. 21, 50-91.
Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.
Buffetaut, Cuny and le Loeuff, 1991. French Dinosaurs: The best record in Europe? Modern Geology. 16(1-2), 17-42.

undescribed neotheropod (Sauvage, 1894)
Middle Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Moulin-Wibert, Boulogne, France
Material
- (Beaugrand coll.) tooth
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but neither described nor illustrated.
Reference- Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1894)
Middle Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Mont-Lambert, Boulogne, France
Material
- teeth
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis.
References- Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.
Sauvage, 1914. Catalogue des reptiles jurassiques du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société académique de Boulogne-sur-Mer. 10, 1-12.
Huene, 1926a. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata. 29, 35-167.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1894)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Wimille, Bouogne, France
Material
- teeth
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but neither described nor illustrated. Note while Huene (1926) lists Megalosaurus teeth from Wimille near Montagne Rouge, Sauvage (1894) does not list any from there, only Cumnoria teeth and eroded fragments.
References- Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.
Sauvage, 1900. Catalogue des Reptiles trouves dans le terrain jurassique-superieur du Boulonnais. Compte rendu de l’Association francaise pour l’avancement des sciences. 1899, 416-419.
Huene, 1926a. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata. 29, 35-167.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1894)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Alcobaça Formation, Crasto and Pembel or Pombal, Portugal
Comments
- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but is neither described nor illustrated.
References- Sauvage, 1894. Les dinosauriens du terrain jurassique supérieur du Boulonnais. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e serie. 22, 465-470.
Sauvage, 1898. Vertébrés fossiles du Portugal: Contributions à l'étude des poissons et des reptiles du jurassique et du crétacique. Direction des Travaux Geologiques du Portugal. Memoires. Comissão do Serviço Geológico de Portugal. 1-46.

undescribed neotheropod (Sauvage, 1898)
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Portugal

Material- tooth
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but is neither described nor illustrated.
Reference- Sauvage, 1898. Les Reptiles et les Poissons des terrains Mésozoïques du Portugal [The reptiles and fishes from the Mesozoic terrains of Portugal]. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 3e série. 26, 442-446.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1898)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Boca do Chapim, Portugal
Material
- teeth (Sauvage, 1898)
(Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) two tooth fragments (FABL 20 mm)
Comments- Sauvage (1898) referred teeth to Megalosaurus superbus. Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957) referred two tooth fragments from the Aptian of Portugal to the same species. but they could belong to any ceratosaur, basal tetanurine, carnosaur or basal coelurosaur.
References- Sauvage, 1898. Vertébrés fossiles du Portugal: Contributions à l'étude des poissons et des reptiles du jurassique et du crétacique. Direction des Travaux Geologiques du Portugal. Memoires. Comissão do Serviço Geológico de Portugal. 1-46.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Sauvage, 1898)
Late Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Viso, Coimbra, Portugal

Referred- ?(Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) partial tooth (~30x12x8 mm), tooth (26 mm), tooth fragment (Sauvage, 1898)
?(Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) incomplete manual ungual (~22 mm), incomplete manual ungual (~17 mm), incomplete manual ungual (~13 mm) (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Comments- The teeth were referred to Megalosaurus sp. by Sauvage (1898), then they and the unguals were referred to Megalosaurus pannoniensis by Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957). The unguals are not comparable to the holotype, though the measured tooth matches it in labiolingual compression and mesiodistal elongation. Whether any specimens were associated is unknown.
References- Sauvage, 1898. Vertébrés fossiles du Portugal: Contributions à l'étude des poissons et des reptiles du jurassique et du crétacique. Direction des Travaux Geologiques du Portugal. Memoires. Comissão do Serviço Geológico de Portugal. 1-46.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed theropod (Seeley, 1899)
Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Hastings Group, England
Material
- (lost) distal femur
Comments- Seeley (1899) described this as a bird most similar to grebes, though Galton and Martin (2002) thought it wasn't a bird. Naish (2000) thought it was very similar to Wessex Formation femur MIWG 6214 except for possessing an extensor/patellar groove. MIWG 6214 has most recently been referred to Ornithomimosauria by Allain et al. (2014).
References- Seeley, 1899. On evidence of a bird from the Wealden beds of Ansty Lane, near Cuckfield. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 55, 416-418.
Naish, 2000. A small, unusual theropod (Dinosauria) femur from the Wealden Group (Lower Cretaceous) of the Isle of Wight, England. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Monatshefte. 2000, 217-234.
Galton and Martin, 2002. Postcranial anatomy and systematics of Enaliornis Seeley, 1876, a footpropelled diving bird (Aves: Ornithurae: Hesperornithiformes) from the Early Cretaceous of England. Revue de Paleobiologie. 21(2), 489-538.
Allain, Vullo, Le Loeuff and Tournepiche, 2014. European ornithomimosaurs (Dinosauria, Theropoda): An undetected record. Geologica Acta. 12(2), 127-135.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Woodward, 1906)
Early Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Wonthoggi Formation of the Strzelecki Group, Victoria, Australia
Material
- (NMV P10058) incomplete ?pedal ungual (Woodward, 1906)
(NMV P186054) incomplete manual phalanx (90 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P186151) partial pedal phalanx (49 mm) (Cleeland, 2004)
?(NMV P186175) vertebra (Cleeland, 2004)
?(NMV P186218) (large) vertebra (Cleeland, 2004)
(NMV P199050) manual phalanx (95 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P199085) incomplete ?manual ungual (~34 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P203700) distal caudal vertebra (29 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P208512) incomplete manual ungual (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P209990) incomplete metatarsal ?IV (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P210090) incomplete distal caudal vertebra (32 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P212806) distal caudal vertebra (29 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P212840) mid caudal neural arch (Cleeland, 2004)
(NMV P216642) incomplete distal caudal vertebra (24 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV coll.) frontal (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
Comments- NMV P199085 is probably the ungual mentioned by Pigdon (online 2000) as being ornithomimosaurian on his Timimus page. Benson et al. (2012) described it as weakly curved with a low flexor tubercle and flattened ventral surface which is broader than the dorsal surface. The authors referred it to Theropoda indet., and there is no evidence it belonged to Timimus.
Rich (2003) reported identifying small theropod skull fragments, but Benson et al. (2012) state the only cranial element known is an unidentified frontal. Cleeland (2004) reported NMV P186175 and P186218, though neither are mentioned by Benson et al..
Kool (2004) reported two small recurved serrationless theropod teeth.
The Dinosaur Dreaming 2007 update notes several theropod teeth and a dorsal centrum were discovered.
References- Woodward, 1906. On a tooth of Ceratodus and a dinosaurian claw from the Lower Jurassic of Victoria, Australia. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 7th series. 103, 1-3.
Pigdon, online 2000. http://home.alphalink.com.au/~dannj/timimus.htm
Rich, 2003. Research update. Dinosaur Dreaming 2003 Report. 22-23.
Cleeland, 2004. A summary of the status of known Cretaceous vertebrate fossil localities on the Strzelecki Coast, Victoria, Australia. Dinosaur Dreaming 2004 Field Report. 10-13.
Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012. Theropod fauna from Southern Australia indicates high polar diversity and climate-driven dinosaur provinciality. PLoS ONE. 7(5), e37122.

undescribed neotheropod (Dollo, 1909)
Hauterivian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Weald Clay, Belgium

Material- tooth
Comments- This tooth was referred to Megalosaurus dunkeri by Dollo (1909), then Altispinax dunkeri by Huene (1926), but has not been described in detail so cannot be compared to the holotype of the former. It may belong to Altispinax, Valdoraptor, Neovenator, Calamosaurus, Eotyrannus or another Wealden theropod.
References- Dollo, 1909. The fossil vertebrates of Belgium. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 19(4), 99-119.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Janensch, 1925)
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Material- (MB R 1934; = MW 5) distal caudal centrum (119 mm)
(MB R 1935; = MW 3) (~7.8 m) partial proximal caudal centrum
(MB R 1940; = TL 45) proximal caudal vertebra (105 mm)
(MB R 2160; = MW 2) incomplete quadrate (transverse condylar width 140 mm)
(MB R lost; = EH 103) (adult) incomplete posterior dorsal vertebra (80 mm)
(MB R lost; = St 297) cervical neural arch
Comments- MB R 1934, 1935 and 2160 were syntypes of Ceratosaurus roechlingi (Janensch, 1925), but the latter is too large to belong to the lectotype individual and none of the specimens is diagnostic beyond Neotheropoda (Rauhut, 2011). Rauhut noted the caudal MB R 1940 shows similiarities to his new carcharodontosaurid Veterupristisaurus, but it derives from higher sediments than that genus.
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Madsen and Welles, 2000. Ceratosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) a revised osteology. Miscellaneous Publication 00-2 Utah Geological Survey. 80 pp.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Huene, 1929)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Mata Amarilla Formation (= Pari Aike Formation), Santa Cruz, Argentina
Material
- (Ameghino coll.) partial tooth (26 mm)
(Ameghino coll.) distal manual phalanx
(Ameghino coll.) long bone epiphysis
Reference- Huene, 1929. Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196.

unnamed neotheropod (Huene, 1929)
Late Coniacian, Late Cretaceous
Plottier Formation of the Rio Neuquen Group, Neuquen, Argentina
Material-
(MLP coll.) incomplete tooth (16 x 9.5 x 6.3 mm)
Comments- Carnosaurus was listed by Huene (1929) in a faunal list for three specimens- a metapodial (MLP CS 1240) from the Allen Formation, a tooth (MACN coll.) perhaps from the Chubut group, and provisionally ("Cf. Carnosaurus") a tooth (MLP coll.) from the Plottier Formation. As Olshevsky (DML, 1999) noted, the name is probably a typographical error for Carnosauria made when translating the paper from German to Spanish. This is indicated by the fact he never attaches a name to these specimens in the description or plates, and indeed states on of the specimens is taxonomically indistinguishable from another named genus. Since "Carnosaurus" was apparently not meant as a valid name when it was published (ICZN Article 11.5), it is a nomen nudum.
Huene described the Plottier tooth under the heading "tooth of a carnivorous saurischian", stating it was not his intention to decide whether it was a coelurosaur or carnosaur. The mesial edge is more convex than the distal edge, especially basally. There are 12.5 serrations per 5 mm, stated to be on both mesial and distal carinae. The tooth seems to be from a somewhat anterior position, as it has an asymmetrical section, with one side generally more convex except for a distally placed concavity. What are described as growth lines on the labial and lingual surfaces may be enamel wrinkles, which are apically concave in the distal half of one side. This tooth is difficult to place without further study of Gondwanan small theropod dentitions and is here assigned to Avepoda.
References- Huene, 1929. Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html

unnamed neotheropod (Lydekker, 1___ in Huene, 1929)
Cretaceous?
Neuquen, Argentina
Material
- dorsal vertebra (100 mm)
References- Lydekker, 1___.
Huene, 1929. Los saurisquios y ornitisquios del Cretacéo Argentino. Anales del Museo de La Plata (series 3). 3, 1-196.

unnamed possible theropod (Huene, 1934)
Santonian-Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Palacio Formation, Uruguay
Material
- tooth
Comments- This tooth was referred to Ornithomimidae by Huene (1934), but we now know that clade is toothless and restricted to the Northern hemisphere. If theropod, the tooth is more probably another type of small coelurosaur or abelisauroid.
Reference- Huene, 1934. Neue Saurier-Zähne aus der Kreide von Uruguay [New saurian teeth from the Cretaceous of Uruguay]. Centralblatt für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paläontologie, Abteilung B: Geologie und Paläontologie. 1934(4), 183-189.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Stromer, 1934)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Baharija Formation, Egypt

Material- (IPHG 1911 XII 29; destroyed) proximal femur
(IPHG 1911 XII 31; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (105 mm)
(IPHG 1911 XII 32; destroyed) distal femur
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 69; paratype of Deltadromeus agilis; destroyed) femur (1.22 m)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 60; destroyed) skull fragment, centrum (~140 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60; paratype of Deltadromeus agilis; destroyed) partial scapula, coracoid
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60a; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (~100 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60b; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (125 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60c; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (130 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60d; destroyed) partial proximal caudal vertebra (120 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60e; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (120 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60f; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (~125 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60g; destroyed) partial distal caudal vertebra (115 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 60h; destroyed) distal caudal vertebra (120 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 63; destroyed) proximal ?metatarsal
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63a; destroyed) proximal caudal centrum (~110 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63b; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (120 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63c; destroyed) incomplete proximal caudal vertebra (123 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63d; destroyed) proximal caudal vertebra (119 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63e; destroyed) distal caudal centrum (87 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63f; destroyed) distal caudal vertebra (78 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 63g; destroyed) distal caudal centrum (71 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 70; paratype of Deltadromeus agilis; destroyed) fibula (1.04 m)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 73; destroyed) incomplete astragalus (180 mm wide)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 75; destroyed) metatarsal IV (430 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 76; destroyed) tibia (575 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 77; destroyed) incomplete scapula, coracoid fragment
(IPHG 1912 VIII 78; paratype of Deltadromeus agilis; destroyed) proximal tibia
(IPHG 1912 VIII 81; paratype of Bahariasaurus ingens; paratype of Deltadromeus agilis; destroyed) pubes (550 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 82; destroyed) ischia (325 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 85; destroyed) distal femur
(IPHG 1912 VIII 88a; destroyed) (juvenile) incomplete dorsal vertebra (70 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 88b; destroyed) centrum (55 mm)
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 88c; destroyed) partial dorsal rib
....(IPHG 1912 VIII 88d; destroyed) distal pubis
(IPHG 1912 VIII 89; destroyed) pedal phalanx (58 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 90; destroyed) incomplete ?manual ungual
(IPHG 1912 VIII 92; destroyed) three incomplete chevrons
(IPHG 1912 VIII 177; destroyed) metatarsals II (523, 543 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 182; destroyed) incomplete humeri or metatarsals
(IPHG 1912 VIII 190; destroyed) (juvenile?) distal tibia
(IPHG 1912 VIII 192; destroyed) incomplete tibia
(IPHG 1912 VIII 193; destroyed) incomplete humerus
Comments- This material was mostly referred to Theropoda gen. et sp. indet. by Stromer (1934), and is retained together as Neotheropoda here for the moment, although study of individual specimens will no doubt allow referral to more precise clades. As with all of Stromer's Baharija material, the fossils themselves were destroyed in 1944.
The pubis IPHG 1912 VIII 81 was referred to Bahariasaurus by Stromer and stated to be "generally very similar to it", but differs several ways. Bahariasaurus has a less conspicuous and more proximally placed lateral flaring (15% down the shaft, compared to 21%). The distal end is not flared laterally. There is an extensive separation of the pubic shafts distally, and the interpubic foramen is more distally placed (80% down the shaft, vs. 71%). The proximally placed interpubic foramen suggests this is tetanurine, while the absent obturator foramen is like spinosaurids, allosaurians and most coelurosaurs. Sereno et al. (1996) referred it to Deltadromeus, but that genus should have an interpubic foramen placed distally in the pubic boot itself as in other ceratosaurs, making the referral unlikely. The specimens listed under IPHG 1912 VIII 60, 69 and 70 were tentatively referred to Bahariasaurus. IPHG 1912 VIII 60a-h is a series of caudals which Stromer wrote of as belonging to a single individual. a is separated proximally, and g-h are located far more distally. The centra are amphicoelous to amphiplatyan, g-h much broader than tall, a-d have a ventral groove which is missing in g-h, and a-c have pleurocoels but d-h do not. All vertebrae have neural spines, but g-h lack transverse processes. Stromer wrote these were associated with the pectoral girdle, though he doesn't state whether the skull fragment or larger centrum were associated more exactly than being from the same layer. The scapula IPHG 1912 VIII 60 is missing most of the acromion and the distal end, but was at least 7.6 times longer than the minimum blade width. There is a slight midshaft expansion anteriorly, and the glenoid faces completely ventrally. The associated coracoid is 84% as deep as it is long, excluding the well developed posteroventral process that is missing its distal end. No obvious coracoid tuber is present, nor is there a subglenoid fossa. Stromer states the pectoral girdle IPHG 1912 VIII 77 is very similar in size and shape, and shows the distal end of the scapula was unexpanded. He declined to officially refer the material to a named species because the pectoral girdle of Spinosaurus was unknown, and remains so today. Interestingly, the coracoid is very similar to Baryonyx, differing only in the more posteriorly positioned coracoid foramen and the lesser concavity below the glenoid. The scapulae are also similar, though Baryonyx's is expanded slightly at the distal end and has a less projected glenoid region. Note that the caudals are unlike spinosaurids' however, as the latter lack pleurocoels. Stromer tentatively referred femur IPHG 1912 VIII 69 to Bahariasaurus based on differences from Spinosaurus and Carcharodontosaurus and similarity in size with referred Bahariasaurus specimen IPHG 1912 VIII 62 which was discovered nearby. Fibula IPHG 1912 VIII 70 was referred to Bahariasaurus for the same reasons, though note Stromer considered it to belong to a larger individual than the femur although they were discovered in the same locality. The femur has an accessory trochanter, so is avetheropod. The anteromedially angled head excludes megaraptorans and carcharodontosaurids as derived as Concavenator, while the non-inclined head also excludes the latter family. The fibula's deep proximomedial fossa indicates it is probably from a ceratosaur or avetheropod, so it's possible they belong to the same taxon. Sereno et al. referred the scapulocoracoid IPHG 1912 VIII 60, femur IPHG 1912 VIII 69 and fibula IPHG 1912 VIII 70 discussed above to Deltadromeus. The scapulocoracoid is more similar to Baryonyx, the femur is avetheropodan so cannot belong to ceratosaurian Deltadromeus, but the fibula is rather similar and may belong to that genus.
IPHG 1912 VIII 78, 85 and 190 were referred to aff. Erectopus sauvagei by Stromer, while IPHG 1912 VIII 76 and 192 and possibly IPHG 1911 XII 29 were referred to cf. Elaphrosaurus bambergi. None of the aff. Erectopus elements (distal femur, proximal and distal tibia) are especially similar to Erectopus. They were all found in different deposits and may belong to different taxa. Sereno et al. referred the proximal tibia to Deltadromeus, and it is very similar to that genus so this may be correct. Of the cf. Elaphrosaurus materials, the proximal femur IPHG 1911 XII 29 has a prominent accessory trochanter unlike Elaphrosaurus, but like avetheropods. The two tibiae IPHG 1912 VIII 76 and 192 are tetanurine due to their distally placed fibular crests that are well separated from the lateral condyle, unlike Elaphrosaurus. They are roughly similar accounting for distortion, and share the same small cnemial crest which leads to an unusually broad proximal outline (76-81% of anteroposterior length), so may be conspecific.
Stromer misidentified IPHG 1912 VIII 82 as pubes, but the strong transverse tapering distally, obturator process and lack of an interpubic foramen all resemble ischia more. IPHG 1912 VIII 63 was identified as proximal femur, but resembles a metatarsal more. Similarly, IPHG 1912 VIII 177 was identified as a humerus but is a metatarsal II.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharije-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 22, 1-79.
Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996. Predatory dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous faunal differentiation. Science. 272(5264), 986-991.

unnamed possible neotheropod (Riabinin, 1937)
Late Barremian-Mid Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Mogoito Member of Murtoi Formation, Russia

Material- distal metapodial or phalanx
Comments- A distal phalanx was discovered in 1931 and referred to Theropoda indet. by Riabinin (1937). Nessov (1995) considered this to be a possibly sauropod metapodial or phalanx. Averianov et al. (2003) referred it to Therizinosauridae based on the unequally deep collateral ligament pits, but Zanno (2008) noted both sides having well defined pits (albeit better developed on one side) is unlike therizinosaurs. Whether this specimen is indeed a theropod at all is still uncertain.
References- Riabin, 1937. A new discovery of dinosaurs in Transbaikalia. Ezhegodnik Vsesoyuznogo Paleontologicheskogo Obshchestva. 11, 141-144.
Nessov, 1995. Dinosaurs of nothern Eurasia: New data about assemblages, ecology, and paleobiogeography. Institute for Scientific Research on the Earth's Crust, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg. 1-156.
Averianov, Starkov and Skutschas, 2003. Dinosaurs from the Early Cretaceous Murtoi Formation in Buryatia, Eastern Russia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23(3), 586-594.
Zanno, 2008. A taxonomic and phylogenetic reevaluation of Therizinosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda): Implications for the evolution of Maniraptora. PhD Thesis. The University of Utah. 329 pp.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lapparent, 1943)
Late Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Solvay Company quarry, Damparis, Jura, France

Material- (MNHN coll.) seven teeth (110, 22, 11, 10 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis.
Reference- Lapparent, 1943. Les dinosauriens jurassiques de Damparis (Jura) [The Jurassic dinosaurs of Damparis (Jura)]. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France (Nouvelle Série). Mémoire 21(47), 1-21.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Early Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Sobral Member of the Farta Pao Formation, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) nine teeth (60, 38, 25 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis and were not reported to be associated.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Foz do Arelho, Leiria, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) six teeth
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but are neither described nor illustrated. They were not reported to be associated.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Late Kimmeridgian-Early Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Lourinha Formation, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) five teeth
(Geology Laboratory of the Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.) two manual unguals (15, ~17 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis, though the teeth are neither described nor illustrated. The unguals cannot be compared to the holotype. None of the material was reported to be associated.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Pombal, Lieria, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) four teeth
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but are neither described nor illustrated. They were not reported to be associated.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Colmeias, Lieria, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) tooth
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but is neither described nor illustrated.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Ourem, Santarem, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) tooth, sacral centrum (90 mm), sacral centrum (80 mm), two partial distal caudal vertebrae, ulnar fragment
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis. The tooth is neither described nor illustrated, and the postcrania cannot be compared to the holotype and may not be theropod. The remains were not reported to be associated, and indeed the sacrals are different sizes.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Porto de Barcas, Lisboa, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) tooth
(Geology Laboratory of the Faculty of Sciences of Lisbon coll.) distal femur
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis. The tooth is neither described nor illustrated, and the femoral fragment cannot be compared to the holotype and may not be theropod. The remains were not reported to be associated.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed possible neotheropod (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Casal Labrusque / Areia Branca, Leiria, Portugal
Materia
l- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) posterior dorsal vertebra (50 mm)
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but cannot be compared to the holotype. The triangular centrum suggests it may not be theropod.
References- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed possible Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Fervença, Leiria, Portugal
Material
- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) distal caudal vertebra (54 mm), distal caudal vertebra (51 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but cannot be compared to the holotype. They were not reported to be associated and may not be theropod.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed possible neotheropod (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Cesareda, Leiria, Portugal
Material- (Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) mid caudal centrum (76 mm)
Comments- This was referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but cannot be compared to the holotype and may not be theropod.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed possible Neotheropoda (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic

Salir do Porto, Portugal
Material-
(Geological Services Museum of Portugal coll.?) three caudal vertebrae
Comments- These were referred to Megalosaurus insignis, but cannot be compared to the holotype. They were not reported to be associated and may not be theropod.
Reference- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lapparent, 1960)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation, Niger

Material- (MNN GDF coll.) posterior skull fragment, dentary fragment, dozen teeth, vertebrae, manual ungual (~290 mm), ilium, proximal femur, several metatarsals, phalanges, three unguals (Taquet, 1976)
(MNNHN Td. 2250) anterior tooth (70 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
Comments- Taquet (1976) notes the tooth MNNHN Td. 2250 is not referrable to Carcharodontosaurus, contra Lapparent.
References- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Memoirs of the Geological Society of France. 88A, 1-57.
Taquet, 1976. Géologie et Paléontologie du Gisement de Gadoufaoua (Aptien du Niger) [Geology and Paleontology of the Gadoufaoua Locality (Aptian of Niger)]. Cahiers de Paléontologie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris. 191 pp.

unnamed neotheropod (Huene, 1966)
Toarcian, Early Jurassic
Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Material
- partial dorsal centrum (80 mm)
Comments- This centrum was described by Huene (1966) as a megalosaurid. It has a convex anterior articular surface.
Reference- Huene, 1966. Ein Megalosauriden- Wirbel des lias aus norddeutschem Geschiebe. Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paläontologie. 1966(5), 318-319.

unnamed neotheropod (Hooijer, 1968)
Cenomanian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Qalamoun, Syria
Material
- (Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie coll.) distal tibia (110 mm transversely)
Comments- Hooijer (1968) believed this to probably come from Carcharodontosaurus or Erectopus, considering both to be megalosaurids. Carrano et al. (2012) referred it to Tetanurae based on the distal compression, but an equal amount is present in Elaphrosaurus and some abelisaurs.
References- Hooijer, 1968. A Cretaceous dinosaur from the Syrian Arab Republic. Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen - Amsterdam, Proceedings Series B. 71, 150-152.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Ostrom, 1970)
Late Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Cloverly Formation, Montana, US

Material- (YPM 5366) tooth
tooth (Maxwell, 1993)
Comments- These teeth were questionably referred to Microvenator by Ostrom, but they are unlikely to belong to an oviraptorosaur and are more probably from basal coelurosaurs similar to Nedcolbertia.
References- Ostrom, 1970. Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Bighorn Basin area, Wyoming and Montana. Peabody Museum of Natural Histoey, Yale University. Bulletin 35, 234 pp.
Maxwell, 1993. Neonate dinosaur remains and dinosaur eggshell from the Lower Cretaceous Cloverly Formation of Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 13(3), 48A.
Maxwell and Horner, 1994. Neonate dinosaurian remains and dinosaurian eggshell from the Cloverly Formation, Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 14(1), 143-146.
Makovicky and Sues. 1998. Anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of the theropod dinosaur Microvenator celer from the Lower Cretaceous of Montana. American Museum Novitates. 3240, 1-27.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Madsen, 1976)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Utah, US
(Cleveland-Lloyd quarry)
Material- (UUVP 30-727) tibia (374 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 40-264) femur (385 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 40-299) tibia (379 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 40-584) maxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 509) maxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1599) tibia (550 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1974) dentary (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1987) metatarsal III (265 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2308) metatarsal III (251 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2584) tibia (358 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2775) metatarsal III (145 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2909) astragalus (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2977) tibia (433 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2998) humerus (280 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3233) tibia (444 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3872) femur (350 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 4909) humerus (277 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
(Reed's Quarry 12)
(YPM 58268) distal ?tibia (Dalman, 2014)
(YPM coll.) proximal ?ulna (Dalman, 2014)
Comments- The Cleveland-Lloyd specimens were listed as Unidentified by Madsen (1976), and may belong to lesser known Morrison theropods like Stokesosaurus and Marshosaurus. Dalman (2014) referred YPM 58268 to Allosauroidea as a distal tibia, but the broad mediolateral expansion distally and apprent intercondylar notch suggests it may be a distal humerus instead. Similarly, Dalman has YPM coll. as a coelurosaurid [sic] proximal humerus, but Nair (pers. comm., 2015) correctly notes it resembles a proximal ulna more.
References- Madsen, 1976. Allosaurus fragilis: A revised osteology. Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Bulletin. 109, 1-163.
Dalman, 2014. New data on small theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Como Bluff, Wyoming, USA. Volumina Jurassica. 12(2), 181-196.

unnamed neotheropod (Mateer, 1987)
Berriasian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Sundays River Formation, South Africa

Material- (SAM K1475) pedal ungual (94 mm)
Comments- Mateer (1987) referred this ungual to either Megalosauridae or Allosauridae, while Nessov (1995) referred it to Therizinosauria or "groups most closely related to them" (which in his opinion consisted of spinosaurids and dryptosaurids). Neither of these opinions was made in the context of a modern understanding of theropod phylogeny however. Provisional comparisons suggest it more closely resembles pedal unguals of Sinraptor and Poekilopleuron than those of any therizinosaurs (Beipiaosaurus, Alxasaurus, Nothronychus, Erlikosaurus), which tend to be deeper and more curved.
References- Mateer, 1987. A new report of a theropod dinosaur from South Africa. Palaeontology. 30(1), 141-145.
Nessov, 1995. Dinosaurs of nothern Eurasia: new data about assemblages, ecology, and paleobiogeography. Institute for Scientific Research on the Earth's Crust, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg. 1-156.

unnamed neotheropod (Mateer, 1987)
Late Jurassic
Enon Conglomerate, South Africa

Material- (SAM 643) tooth (28 mm)
(SAM 649) tooth (>32 mm)
Comments- These teeth lack mesial serrations, and have 18-20 serrations per 5 mm on the distal carina. As no other details are available besides general shape in lateral view and absence of vertical striations (unlike some ceratosaurids), it is unlikely these teeth can be classified more precisely based on published data.
Reference- Mateer, 1987. A new report of a theropod dinosaur from South Africa. Palaeontology. 30(1), 141-145.

unnamed possible Neotheropoda (Werner, 1994)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Wadi Milk Formation, Sudan
Material
- (Vb-715) pedal ungual
(Vb-716) pedal ungual
Comments- These two unguals were referred to Ornithomimosauria by Werner (1994), but differ from known taxa in being more dorsoventrally compressed and broader, with no lateral grooves or flanges, almost no posterodorsal process, a low flexor tubercle instead of a fossa, and paired fossae posterior to this with a foramen in each. They may not be theropod.
Reference- Werner, 1994. Die kontinentale Wirbeltierfauna aus der unteren Oberkreide des Sudan (Wadi Milk Formation) [The continental vertebrate fauna of the lower Upper Cretaceous of Sudan (Wadi Milk Formation)]. In Kohring and Martin (eds.). Miscellanea Palaeontologica 3: Festschrift Bernard Krebs. Berliner Geowissenschaften Abhandlungen, Reihe E. 13, 221-249.

unnamed Neotheropoda (DeCourten, 1991)
Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Ruby Ranch Member of Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, US

Material- (UUVP 904) tooth (DeCourten, 1991)
ilum (Kirkland et al., 1997)
Comments- DeCourten (1991) assigned this tooth to Acrocanthosaurus, but Kirkland and Parrish (1995), Kirkland et al. (1997) and Harris (1998) disagreed, citing coarser serrations (1/mm as opposed to Acrocanthosaurus' 2/mm). Harris suggested the ilium may belong to the same individual or taxon, but noted it cannot be compared with Acrocanthosaurus.
References- Decourten, 1990. The Long Walk Quarry: A new horizon in dinosaur research. Canyon Legacy. 6, 15-22.
DeCourten, 1991. The Long Walk Quarry and tracksite: Unveiling the mysterious Early Cretaceous of the Dinosaur Triangle region. In Averett (ed.). Guidebook for dinosaur quarries and tracksites tour, Western Colorado and Eastern Utah. Grand Junction: Grand Junction Geological Society. 19-25.
Kirkland and Parrish, 1995. Theropod teeth from the Lower and Middle Cretaceous of Utah. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 15(3), 39A.
Kirkland, Britt, Burge, Carpenter, Cifelli, DeCourten, Eaton, Hasiotis and Lawton, 1997. Lower to Middle Cretaceous dinosaur faunas of the Central Colorado Plateau: A key to understanding 35 million years of tectonics, sedimentology, evolution, and biogeography. Brigham Young University Geology Studies. 42, 69-103.
Harris, 1998. Large, Early Cretaceous theropods in North America. In Lucas, Kirkland and Estep (eds.). New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 14, 225-228.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Tamara et al., 1991)
Late Cenomanian-Early Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Jobu Formation of Mifune Group, Japan

Material- (Kitakyusyu Museum of Natural History coll.) tooth
(Kitakyusyu Museum of Natural History coll.) two dorsal neural arches, fibula
(Mifune Board of Education laboratory coll.) four teeth, incomplete tibia, fibula, distal metatarsal II, distal metatarsal III
Comments- These remains were stated to be like Allosaurus by Tamara et al. (1991), though Chure (2000) thought they were different enough to be excluded from Allosauridae. A femur was associated with the dorsal neural arches and fibula, but Chure correctly notes it resembles pterosaurs more. The teeth differ from Allosaurus in being taller with straight posterior margins. The neural arches differ in having lower and thinner neural spines. The tibia and fibulae are too damaged to be useful. The distal metatarsals differ in being transversely wider, with larger rounder flexor depressions and less cranioproximally extensive distal articular surfaces.
References- Tamara, Okazaki and Ikegami, 1991. Occurence of carnosaurian and herbivorous dinosaurs from upper formation of Mifune Group, Japan, Memiors of the Faculty of Education, Kumamoto University. 40, 31-45.
Chure, Manabe, Tanimoto and Tomida, 1999. An unusual theropod tooth from the Mifune Group (Late Cenomanian to Early Turonian), Kumamoto, Japan. In Tomida, Rich, and Vickers-Rich (eds.). Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium. National Science Museum (Tokyo) Monographs. 15, 291-296.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.

unnamed neotheropod (Brokenshire and Clarke, 1993)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Lower Kimmeridge Clay, England

Material- (private coll.) two pedal phalanges
Comments- These were described as ornithomimid by Brokenshire and Clarke (1993), but Martill et al. (2006) could not place it more exactly than Theropoda indet..
References- Brokenshire and Clarke, 1993. Important recently collected dinosaurian remains from the Lower Kimmeridge Clay at Weymouth. Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society. 115, 177-178.
Martill, Naish and Earland, 2006. Dinosaurs in marine strata: Evidence from the British Jurassic, including a review of the allochthonous vertebrate assemblage from the marine Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Great Britain. In Colectivo Arqueológico-Paleontológico Salense (ed.). Actas de las III Jornadas sobre Dinosaurios y su Entorno. Salas de los Infantes (Burgos, España). 35-72.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Casanovas-Cladellas et al., 1993)
Tithonian-Berriasian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous
Villar del Arzobispo Formation, Spain
Material
- (BZ-3) partial tooth (Casanovas-Cladellas et al., 1993)
(FS-1) incomplete tooth (?x37.1x20.6 mm) (Suñer, Santisteban and Galobart, 2005)
(GAOO/CL/14) tooth (Barco and Ruiz-Omeñaca 2001a)
(LP-1) partial tooth (?x19.4x15 mm) (Suñer, Santisteban and Galobart, 2005)
(LV-1) tooth (67.5x24.7x11.1 mm) (Suñer, Santisteban and Galobart, 2005)
(MPZ01/97) proximal caudal centrum (Barco and Ruiz-Omeñaca 2001b)
(PM-1) partial pedal ungual (Suñer, Santisteban and Galobart, 2005)
tooth (Abella and Suñer, 2004)
three teeth, one bone (Suñer and Martín, 2009)
fifteen partial teeth (Gasco et al., 2012)
Comments- BZ-3 was assigned to Carnosauria by Casanovas-Cladellas et al. (1993), then to Theropoda indet. by Ruiz-Omeñaca and Canudo (2003).
References- Casanovas-Cladellas, Santafé-Llopis and Santisteban-Bové, 1993. First dinosaur teeth from the Lower Cretaceous of Benicatazara (Aras de Alpuente, Valencia). Revue de Paléobiologie. Special volume 7, 37-44.
Barco and Ruiz-Omeñaca, 2001a. Primeros dientes de terópodos (Dinosauria, Saurischia) en la Formación Villar del Arzobispo (Titónico-Berriasiense): Yacimientos Cuesta Lonsal y Las Cerradicas 2 (Galve, Teruel). Publicaciones del Seminario de Paleontología de Zaragoza. 5, 239-246.
Barco and Ruiz-Omeñaca, 2001b. Primeros restos postcraneales de terópodos (Dinosauria, Saurischia) en la Formación Villar del Arzobispo (Titónico-Berriasiense): Un centro vertebral caudal del yacimiento Carretera (Galve, Teruel). Publicaciones del Seminario de Paleontología de Zaragoza. 5, 247-254.
Ruiz-Omeñaca and Canudo, 2003. Dinosaurios (Saurischia, Ornithischia) en el Barremiense (Cretácico inferior) de la Península Ibérica. In Pérez-Lorente (Ed.). Dinosaurios y otros reptiles Mesozoicos en España. Ciencias de la Tierra. 26, 269-312.
Canudo and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2003. Los restos directos de dinosaurios teropodos (excluyendo Aves) en Espana. In Pérez-Lorente (Ed.). Dinosaurios y otros reptiles Mesozoicos en España. Ciencias de la Tierra. 26, 347-373.
Abella and Suñer, 2004. Un nuevo diente aislado de terópodo del yacimiento de El Chopo (Alpuente, Los Serranos, Valencia). Libro de Resúmenes del II Encuentro de Jóvenes Investigadores en Paleontología. 87-88.
Suñer, Santisteban and Galobart, 2005. Nuevos restos de Theropoda del Jurásico Superior-Cretácico Inferior de la Comarca de Los Serranos (Valencia). Revista Española de Paleontologia. N. Extra X, 93-99.
Suñer and Martín, 2009. Un nuevo yacimiento del tránsito Jurásico-Cretácico de Alpuente (Los Serranos, Valencia, España): Resultados preliminares. Paleolusitana. 1, 441-447.
Gascó, Cobos, Royo-Torres, Mampel and Alcalá, 2012. Theropod teeth diversity from the Villar del Arzobispo Formation (Tithonian-Berriasian) at Riodeva (Teruel, Spain). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. 92(2), 273-285.

unnamed neotheropod (Fiorillo and Currie, 1994)
Late Albian, Early Cretaceous
Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, US

Material- (CM 72651) tooth fragment
Comments- Fiorillo (1999) described a tooth fragment with labiolingually elongate serrations and no blood grooves, which he felt was very similar to specimens described as Theropod A by Fiorillo and Currie (1994).
Reference- Fiorillo and Currie, 1994. Theropod teeth from the Judith River Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of south-central Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 14, 74-80.
Fiorillo, 1999. Non-mammalian microvertebrate remains from the Robison Eggshell site, Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Emery County, Utah. In Gillette (ed.). Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. Utah Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Publication. 99-1, 259-268.

undescribed neotheropod (Metcalf and Walker, 1994)
Early Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Chipping Norton Formation, England
Material
- (GLRCM coll.; C) premaxillary tooth (3.4 mm)
Comments- This was labeled as "dromaeosaur-like" by Metcalf and Walker (1994).
It is a premaxillary tooth which is serrated on both carinae, though the mesial serrations do not extend as basally. Serrations are very flat and low with no blood pits. Serration density is 5-6/mm mesially and distally.
These are all fairly basal characters, suggesting the tooth may come from a basal tetanurine or carnosaur, or perhaps a very basal coelurosaur.
Reference- Metcalf and Walker, 1994. A new Bathonian microvertebrate locality in the English Midlands. In Fraser and Sues (eds.). In the Shadow of the Dinosaurs- Mesozoic Small Tetrapods. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. 322-332.

unnamed neotheropod (Long, 1995)
Cenomianian-Early Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Molecap Greensand, Western Australia
Material
- (WAM 92.7.1) (~4 m) pedal phalanx IV-1 (40.8 mm)
Comments- Long (1995) thought this was probably a carnosaur, but Carrano et al. (2012) believed it to be Theropoda indet.
References- Long, 1995. A theropod dinosaur bone from the Late Cretaceous Molecap Greensand, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum. 17, 143-146.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Nessov, 1995)
Mid-Late Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Bissekty Formation, Uzbekistan

Material- (CCMGE 450/12457) partial braincase (Nessov, 1995)
several braincase fragments (Sues and Averianov, 2004)
Comments- Nessov (1995) figured CCMGE 450/12457 as a "relatively large carnosaur". Sues and Averianov (2004) referred several braincases to Itemirus, but these were not mentioned in Sues and Averianov's (2014) resulting revision of the genus. Sues (pers. comm. 2014) stated these were fragments that showed few diagnostic features once prepared, so their identification remains uncertain. Nessov also tentatively referred a basisphenoid fragment (CCMGE 719/12457) to a segnosaur, but Sues and Averianov (2015) stated it was "too fragmentary for more precise taxonomic identification beyond Theropoda." Given the age and location, all of these are probably coelurosaurs.
References- Nessov, 1995. Dinosaurs of Northern Eurasia: New data about assemblages, ecology, and paleobiogeography. Institute for Scientific Research on the Earth's Crust, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg. 1-156.
Sues and Averianov, 2004. Dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) of Dzharakuduk, Kyzylkum Desert, Uzbekistan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 51A-52A.
Sues and Averianov, 2014. Dromaeosauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Bissekty Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Turonian) of Uzbekistan and the phylogenetic position of Itemirus medullaris Kurzanov, 1976. Cretaceous Research. 51, 225-240.
Sues and Averianov, 2015. Therizinosauroidea (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Uzbekistan. Cretaceous Research. 59, 155-178.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Currie, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 1996)
Late Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Eumeralla Formation of the Otway Group, Victoria, Australia
Material
- (NMV P180856) incomplete metatarsal ?II (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P180899) distal manual phalanx (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P185858) distal caudal vertebra (43 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P186386) surangular (Currie, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 1996)
(NMV P199783) distal caudal vertebra (44 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P223063) distal caudal vertebra (23 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
(NMV P229456) distal caudal vertebra (25 mm) (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
Comments- Though NMV P186386 was identified as an oviraptorosaur by Currie et al. (1996) based on its medially projecting coronoid process, Agnolin et al. (2010) noted the convex margin with no obvious external mandibular fenestra and lack of articular fusion differed from that clade.
References- Currie, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 1996. Possible oviraptorosaur (Theropoda, Dinosauria) specimens from the Early Cretaceous Otway Group of Dinosaur Cove, Australia. Alcheringa. 20(1-2), 73-79.
Agnolin, Ezcurra, Pais and Salisbury, 2010. A reappraisal of the Cretaceous non-avian dinosaur faunas from Australia and New Zealand: Evidence for their Gondwanan affinities. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(2), 257-300.
Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012. Theropod fauna from Southern Australia indicates high polar diversity and climate-driven dinosaur provinciality. PLoS ONE. 7(5), e37122.

unnamed neotheropod (Long and Cruickshank, 1996)
Hauterivian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Birdrong Sandstone, Western Australia
Material
- (WAM 96.5.1) (~5 m) incomplete mid caudal vertebra (~63 mm)
Comments- Long and Cruickshank (1996) referred this to Tetanurae without justification, and Carrano et al. (2012) believed it to be Theropoda indet..
References- Long and Cruickshank, 1996. First record of an Early Cretaceous theropod dinosaur bone from Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum. 18, 219-222.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Russell, 1996)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kem Kem beds, Morocco

Material- (CMN 41770; bone taxon N) metatarsal IV (430 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 41806; bone taxon E) coracoid fragment (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 41863; bone taxon D) partial distal caudal vertebra (86 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50382; bone taxon M) (3.78 kg, juvenile) femur (118 mm)
(CMN 50797; bone taxon D) incomplete distal caudal vertebra (65 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50807; bone taxon A) (adult) frontals (50 mm), parietals (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50808; bone taxon A) (adult) frontals (65 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 50810; bone taxon B) (~4 m) (subadult) axis (45 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50826; bone taxon P) partial pedal ungual (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50830; bone taxon O) metatarsal V (187 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50839a-e; bone taxon K) manual ungual fragments (~20-50 mm) (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50842a; bone taxon K) manual ungual fragment (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50842b; bone taxon L) partial manual ungual (Russell, 1996)
(CMN 50987; bone taxon P; cast) incomplete pedal ungual (Russell, 1996)
(ROM 65779) (>5 year old adult) incomplete femur (Evans, Barrett, Brink and Carrano, 2014)
Comments- Bone taxa G, I, J and M (in part) are here referred to Spinosaurus based on Ibrahim et al. (2014) for the first three and Chiarenza et al. (2016) for the last, bone taxon F to a Xuanhanosaurus-like tetanurine, and bone taxon H to a noasaurid. McFeeters (2013) could only identify CMN 50810 to Saurischia incertae sedis, though he noted it was possibly a non-abelisauroid ceratosaur if theropod (so maybe a juvenile Deltadromeus). Chiarenza and Cau referred bone taxon C to Abelisauria based on similarity to Libyan abelisaur PRC.NF.1.21.
References- Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Museum national d'Histoire naturelle. 18, 349-402.
McFeeters, 2013. Bone "taxon" B: Reevaluation of a supposed small theropod dinosaur from the Mid-Cretaceous of Morocco. Kirtlandia. 58, 38-41.
Evans, Barrett, Brink and Carrano, 2014. Osteology and bone microstructure of new, small theropod dinosaur material from the early Late Cretaceous of Morocco. Gondwana Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.gr.2014.03.016
Chiarenza and Cau, 2016. A large abelisaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Morocco and comments on the Cenomanian theropods from North Africa. PeerJ. 4:e1754.

undescribed possible Neotheropoda (Nessov, Zhegallo and Averianov, 1998)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Mizdah Formation, Libya
Material
- teeth
References- Nessov, Zhegallo and Averianov, 1998. A new locality of Late Cretaceous snakes, mammals and other vertebrates in Africa (western Libya). Annales de Paléontologie. 84(3-4), 265-275.
Rage and Cappetta, 2002. Vertebrates from the Cenomanian, and the geological age of the Draa Ubari fauna (Libya). Annales de Paléontologie. 88, 79-84.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Rodriguez de la Rosa and Cevallos-Ferriz, 1998)
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Cerro del Pueblo Formation, Mexico
Material
- (IGM-7714) partial caudal centrum
(IGM-7716) distal pedal phalanx
Comments- Rodriguez de la Rosa and Cevallos-Ferriz (1998) assigned IGM-7714 to Theropoda indet. and IGM-7716 to probable Dromaeosauridae, but the somewhat centrally placed collateral ligement pit and uncertain phalangeal identity make assignment more precise than Neotheropoda uncertain.
Reference- Rodriguez de la Rosa and Cevallos-Ferriz, 1998. Vertebrates of the El Pelillal locality (Campanian, Cerro del Pueblo Formation), southeastern Coahuila, Mexico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(4), 751-764.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Rodriguez-de la Rosa and Aranda-Manteca, 1999)
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
El Gallo Formation, Mexico
Material
- (FCM 06/053) tooth (~20x9.5x5.6 mm) (Rodríguez-de la Rosa and Aranda-Manteca, 1999)
(LACM 17696) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 17697) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 17701) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 17704) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 17714) teeth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 20879) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 20889) phalanx, distal phalanx (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 28993) teeth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 28997) teeth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42563) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42564) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42565) manual ungual (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42571) distal manual phalanx (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42574) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42631) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42638) manual phalanx (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42669) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42685) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42687) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42703) ungual (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42704) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 42705) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 52458) teeth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 57871) tooth fragment (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 101163) teeth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 101164) manual phalanx (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 101173) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 101182) caudal vertebra (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 101183) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(LACM 101184) teeth (Hilton, 2003)
(UCMP coll.) vertebrae, ribs (Hilton, 2003)
(UCMP coll.) tooth (Hilton, 2003)
(IGM coll.) tooth (Romo de Vivar, 2011)
(IGM coll.) tooth (Romo de Vivar, 2011)
(IGM coll.) tooth (Romo de Vivar, 2011)
Comments- FCM 06/053 (Rodríguez-de la Rosa and Aranda-Manteca, 1999, 2000) is a tooth notable for its high DSDI and distal serrations being located inside a groove. Note while one might be tempted to compare this to Sinornithosaurus, which also has a high DSDI and supposedly venom-related grooves, the grooves of the latter are located labially, not distally.
References- Rodríguez-de la Rosa and Aranda-Manteca, 1999. Theropod teeth from the Late Cretaceous El Gallo Formation, Baja California, Mexico. VII International Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems. 56.
Rodríguez-de la Rosa and Aranda-Manteca, 2000.Where there venomous theropods? Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(3), 64A.
Hilton, 2003. Dinosaurs and other Mesozoic Reptiles of California. University of California Press. 356 pp.
Romo de Vivar, 2011. Microvertebrados Cretácicos Tardíos del área de El Rosario, Baja California, México. MS thesis, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. 146 pp.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Manabe and Barrett, 2000)
Valanginian-Hauterivian, Early Cretaceous
Kuwajima Formation of the Tetori Group, Japan
Material
- (SBEI-156) incomplete tooth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
(SBEI-170) tooth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
(SBEI-171) tooth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
(SBEI-576) tooth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
(SBEI-814) incomplete tooth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
Comments- These small teeth were announced as velociraptorine in Barrett and Manabe's (2000) abstract, but Matsuoka et al. (2002) note none have high DSDIs, so merely refer to them as Theropod Type B.
References- Barrett and Manabe, 2000. The dinosaur fauna from the Earliest Cretaceous Tetori Group of Central Honshu, Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(3), 28A-29A.
Matsuoka, Kusuhashi, Takada and Setoguchi, 2002. A clue to the Neocomian vertebrate fauna: Initial results from the Kuwajima 'Kaseki-kabe' (Tetori Group) in Shiramine, Ishikawa, central Japan. Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Series of Geology and Mineralogy. 59(1), 33-45.

undescribed neotheropod (Rauhut, 2000)
Early Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Alcobaca Formation, Portugal
Material
- (IPFUB Gui Th 5) manual ungual
Reference- Rauhut, 2000. The dinosaur fauna from the Guimarota mine. In Martin and Krebs (eds.). Guimarota - A Jurassic Ecosystem. Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil. 75-82.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Hutt, 2001)
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Wessex Formation, England

Material- (IWCMS 1995.234) tooth
(IWCMS 1995.235) tooth
(IWCMS 1996.154) sacrum, fragments
(IWCMS 1997.152) premaxilla
(IWCMS 2000.1108) metatarsal
(MIWG 46) tooth
(MIWG 1473) humeral shaft
?(MIWG 1498) fragment
?(MIWG 1587) fragment
?(MIWG 3006) fragment
?(MIWG 3240) fragment
(MIWG 3644) fragment
(MIWG 5120) tooth
(MIWG 5121) tooth
(MIWG 5126) tooth
(MIWG 5129) teeth
(MIWG 5134) teeth
(MIWG 5181) jaw fragment
(MIWG 5182) jaw fragment
(MIWG 5185) tooth fragment
(MIWG 5229) rib
(MIWG 5139) tooth
(MIWG 5245) fragment
(MIWG 5251) rib
(MIWG 5309) rib
(MWIG 5358) teeth
(MWIG 5424) caudal vertebra
(MWIG 5439) tooth
(MIWG 5456) sacrum
(MIWG 5820) cervical vertebra
(MIWG 5823) dorsal vertebra
(MIWG 5924) centrum
(MIWG 5832) pectoral or pelvic elements
(MIWG 5962) teeth
(MIGW 6214) femur
(MIWG 6350) pubis, femur
(MIWG 6351) tooth
(MIWG 6515) cervical vertebra
(MIWG 6516) cervical vertebra
(MIWG 6479) caudal vertebra
(MIWG 6869) tooth
(MIWG 6913) ?dorsal vertebra
(MIWG 7049) tibia
Reference- Hutt, 2001. Catalogue of Wealden Group Dinosauria in the Museum of Isle of Wight Geology. In Martill and Naish (eds). Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight. The Palaeontological Association. 411-422.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Milner, 2002)
Berriasian, Early Cretaceous
Purbeck Limestone Group, England
Material
- ?(BMNH 48251 in part) nine teeth (Fowler, 2007 online)
(BMNH 44806) tooth (64 mm) (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R 2566a) tooth (28.5 mm) (Woodward, 1895)
(BMNH R 2566b) tooth (31.5 mm) (Woodward, 1895)
(BMNH R 2566c) tooth (26.5 mm) (Woodward, 1895)
(BMNH R 2567a) tooth (Milner, 2002)
(BMNH R 2567b) tooth (Milner, 2002)
(BMNH R 2821) tooth (56.8 mm) (Milner, 2002)
(BMNH R 6908; = DORCM G 80) partial metatarsal III (~280 mm) (Milner, 2002)
Early Berriasian, Early Cretaceous
Marly Freshwater Member of Lulworth Formation of Purbeck Limestone Group, England

(CAMSM J 13956) pedal phalanx III-1 (24 mm) (Milner, 2002)
Comments- Lydekker (1888) assigned BMNH 44806 to Megalosaurus dunkeri, while it was later assigned to Altispinax dunkeri (Huene, 1926) and Megalosaurus sp. (Delair, 1959). BMNH R 2566 was assigned to Megalosaurus sp. by Woodward (1895). Milner (2002) felt these and three others (BMNH R 2567 and 2821) were closer to allosaurids than megalosaurids based on their higher DSDI. However, Dubreuillosaurus has a comparably high DSDI, so this is not a valid character for distinguishing carnosaurs from basal tetanurines. The teeth are retained in Neotheropoda indet. until they are described in more detail. Neither these nor the pedal phalanx are illustrated. Fowler (2007 online) searched the crocodilian BMNH remains and found nine teeth that are probably theropod instead.
The distal metatarsal III was found before 1954 but only described in 2002 by Milner. She tentatively assigned it to the Eumaniraptora based on slenderness, non-arctometatarsal condition and spatiotemporal occurance (earlier than known oviraptorosaurs, which are incorrectly said to be only known from Mongolia and Canada). However, most eumaniraptorans have ginglymoid third metatarsi (Bambiraptor, Velociraptor, Deinonychus, Dromaeosaurus, Achillobator, Rahonavis, Shenzhouraptor, Hulsanpes, basal Avebrevicauda), a subarctometatarsus (Pedopenna, Sinornithosaurus, Graciliraptor, Archaeopteryx), or both (Neuquenraptor, Microraptor, Troodontidae, Buitreraptor). Possible exceptions are scansoriopterygids, Jixiangornis and Yandangornis, though the former are only known from juvenile material and the latter two are illustrated and described poorly. So contra Milner, I find this metatarsal to most likely not be eumaniraptoran. Many non-paravian theropods can be excluded due to arctometatarsaly or subarctometatarsaly (tyrannosaurids, ornithomimosaurs, mononykines, basal oviraptorosaurs) or ginglymoidy (Compsognathus, Dilong, allosaurids, Acrocanthosaurus, Sinraptor, Torvosaurus). However, there are still several equally plausible alternatives left for the Purbeck metatarsal, which resembles not only oviraptorids, but also such varied taxa as Fukuiraptor, Falcarius, Tanycolagreus, Ornitholestes, Coelurus, Nqwebasaurus, Elaphrosaurus and Masiakasaurus. I recommend classifying it as Neotheropoda indet..
References- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum of Natural History, London. 309 pp.
Woodward, 1895. Note on megalosaurian teeth discovered by Mr. J. Alstone in the Portlandian of Aylesbury. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 14, 31-32.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous Formations, principally in Europe. Revista del Museo de La Plata. 29, 1-167.
Delair, 1959. The Mesozoic reptiles of Dorset. Part 2. Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society. 80, 52-90.
Milner, 2002. Theropod dinosaurs of the Purbeck Limestone Group, southern England. In Milner and Batten (eds.). Life and Environments in Purbeck Times. Special Papers in Palaeontology. 68, 191-201.
Fowler, 2007 online. http://www.denverfowler.com/publications/Fowler_2007_SVP.htm

unnamed Neotheropoda (Torices, 2002)
Late Campanian-Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Tremp Formation, Spain

Material- (DPM-MON-T10; Morphotype 1) tooth (42x15x7 mm) (Torices, 2002)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Tremp Formation, Spain
?(IPS-81878) incomplete limb element (Blanco, Mendez and Marmi, 2015)
(MPZ98/67; Morphotype 1) tooth (27.5x27x13 mm) (Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015)
(MPZ2004/5; Morphotype 1) tooth (18 mm) (Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015)
(MPZ2004/8; Morphotype 1) tooth (28x12x7.5 mm) (Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015)
References- Torices, 2002. Los dinosaurios terópodos del Cretácico Superior de la Cuenca de Tremp (Pirineos Sur-Centrales, Lleida). Coloquios de Paleontología. 53, 139-146.
Blanco, Mendez and Marmi, 2015. The fossil record of the uppermost Maastrichtian Reptile Sandstone (Tremp Formation, northeastern Iberian Peninsula). Spanish Journal of Palaeontology. 30(1), 147-160.
Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015. Theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Pyrenees Basin of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(3), 611-626.

undescribed neotheropod (Hilton, 2003)
Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Chico Formation, California, US
Material
- (SC VRD57) (juvenile) limb bone fragment
Reference- Hilton, 2003. Dinosaurs and Other Mesozoic Reptiles of California. University of California Press. 312 pp.

undescribed neotheropod (Kellner, Mirzaie Ataabadi, Dalla Vecchia, de Paulo Silva and Pourbagheban, 2003)
Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous
red beds of the Ab Bid syncline, Iran
Material
- tooth
References- Kellner, Mirzaie Ataabadi, Dalla Vecchia, de Paulo Silva and Pourbagheban, 2003. Theropod dinosaurs from Iran. Simposio Brasileiro de Paleontologia de Vertebrados III, 34.
Mirzaie Ataabadi, Kellner, Dalla Vecchia and Paula Silva, 2005. Palaeoichnology and palaeontology of dinosaurs in north of Kerman, south east central Iran. Geosciences. 14(54), 36-47.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Kurzanov, Efimov, and Gubin, 2003)
Callvonian-Oxfordian, Middle Jurassic-Late Jurassic
Djaskoian Formation, Russia

Material- (PIN 4874/2) six teeth (10-15 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Allosaurus sp. by Kurzanov et al. (2003) because they were said to be similar to "Labrosaurus" stechowi and "Labrosaurus" (=Ceratosaurus) sulcatus, and the type species of Labrosaurus (L. lucaris) is a junior synonym of Allosaurus. However, the Djaskoian teeth appear to lack the distinctive fluting found in "L." stechowi and C. sulcatus (which are both ceratosaurids), while L. lucaris doesn't preserve teeth. Carrano et al. (2012) believed they could not be identified past Theropoda indet..
References- Kurzanov, Efimov, and Gubin, 2003. New archosaurs from the Jurassic of Siberia and Mongolia. Paleontological Journal. 37(1), 53-57.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Candeiro, Bergqvist, Novas and Currie, 2004)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Marilia Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Material- (CPP 128, 243, 271, 371, 374) five teeth
Reference- Candeiro, Bergqvist, Novas and Currie, 2004. Theropod teeth from the Marilia Formation (Upper Maastrichtian), Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 204A.
Candeiro, Currie and Bergqvist, 2012. Theropod teeth from the Marília Formation (Late Maastrichtian) at the paleontological site of Peirópolis in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Geociências. 42(2), 323-330.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Candeiro, Abranches, Abrantes, Avilla, Martins, Moreira, Torres, Bergqvist, 2004)
Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Adamantina Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil
Material
- (UFRJ-DG 375-Rd) tooth
(UFRJ-DG 376-Rd) tooth
(UFRJ-DG 377-Rd) tooth
Reference- Candeiro, Abranches, Abrantes, Avilla, Martins, Moreira, Torres, Bergqvist, 2004. Dinosaur remains from western Sao Paulo State, Brazil (Bauru Basin, Adamantina Formation, Late Cretaceous). Journal of South American Earth Sciences. 18, 1-10.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Chapman, Deck, Varricchio and Jackson, 2004)
Late Albian-Cenomanian, Early-Late Cretaceous
Wayan Formation, Idaho, US
Material
- (IMNH 2251/49806) (juvenile) mid-posterior dorsal centrum (49.9 mm) (Krumenacker, Simon, Scofield and Varricchio, 2016)
(IMNH 2251/50850) incomplete mid caudal vertebra (Krumenacker, Simon, Scofield and Varricchio, 2016)
Comments- Chapman et al. (2004) reported "limited, non-diagnostic remains from a larger theropod" and "unprepared theropod fossils", but these were presumably described by Krumenacker et al. (2016).
References- Chapman, Deck, Varricchio and Jackson, 2004. Cretaceous Wayan Formation of Idaho: A preliminary report. 24(3), 151-152.
Krumenacker, Simon, Scofield and Varricchio, 2016. Theropod dinosaurs from the Albian-Cenomanian Wayan Formation of eastern Idaho. Historical Biology. DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2015.1137913

undescribed Neotheropoda (Buckley, McCrea and Currie, 2005)
Mid Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Kaskapau Formation, British Columbia, Canada
Material
- two teeth
References- Buckley, McCrea and Currie, 2005. Theropod teeth from the Upper Cretaceous Kaskapau (Middle Turonian) and the Wapiti (Upper Campanian - Lower Maastrichtian) formations of north-eastern
British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(3), 40A-41A.
Rylaarsdam, Varban, Plint, Buckley and McCrea, 2006. Middle Turonian dinosaur paleoenvironments in the Upper Cretaceous Kaskapau Formation, northeast British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 43(6), 631-652.

unnamed neotheropod (Galton and Molnar, 2005)
Middle Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Taynton Limestone Formation (=Stonesfield Slate), England

Material- (MB R 2351) distal tibia (32.1 mm wide)
Comments- Though Ezcurra and Agnolin (2012) referred this specimen to Abelisauroidea, Rauhut (2012) noted their listed characters have broader distributions and are not consistently found in abelisauroids. He regarded it as Neotheropoda (their Averostra) indet., which seems valid as some ceratosaurs (e.g. Quilmesaurus, Majungasaurus) and most tetanurines have similar amounts of distal anteroposterior compression.
References- Galton and Molnar, 2005. Tibiae of small theropod dinosaurs from Southern England: From the Middle Jurassic of Stonesfield near Oxford and the Lower Cretaceous of the Isle of Wight. In Carpenter (ed.). The Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Indiana University Press. 3-22.
Ezcurra and Agnolin, 2012. An abelisauroid dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Laurasia and its implications on theropod palaeobiogeography and evolution. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 123(3), 500-507.
Rauhut, 2012. A reappraisal of a putative record of abelisauroid theropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of England. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 123(5), 779-786.

unnamed Neotheropoda (O'Connor et al., 2006)
Early Cretaceous
Unit 1 of the Red Sandstone Group, Tanzania

Material- (TNM 02088) tooth (FABL ~11.5 mm)
(TNM 03041) two incomplete proximal caudal vertebrae (80 mm)
(TNM coll.) eight lateral teeth, two anterior teeth
Reference- O'Connor, Gottfried, Stevens, Roberts, Ngasala, Kapilima and Chami, 2006. A new vertebrate fauna from the Cretaceous Red Sandstone Group, Rukwa Rift Basin, southwestern Tanzania. Journal of African Earth Sciences. 44, 277-288.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Torres-Rodriguez, 2006)
Late Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Aguja Formation, Mexico
Material
- (IGM 6213) tooth (Torres-Rodriguez, 2006)
(IGM coll.) tooth fragment (Monroy-Mujica, 2009)
(IGM coll.) tooth (Monroy-Mujica, 2009)
(IGM coll.) tooth (Monroy-Mujica, 2009)
(IGM coll.) tooth (Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015)
(IGM coll.) phalanx (Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015)
References- Torres-Rodríguez, 2006. Terópodos del Cretácico Superior del Estado de Coahuila, México. MS thesis, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. 91 pp.
Monroy-Mújica, 2009. Microvertebrados fósiles Cretácicos Tardíos (Campaniano Tardío) de la Formación Aguja en el Noroeste de Coahuila, México. Tesis Licenciatura. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. 111 pp.
Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015. Diversity of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from Mexico. Boletín Geológico y Minero. 126(1), 63-108.

undescribed neotheropod (Hall and Goodwin, 2007)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Mugher Mudstone, Ethiopia

Material- tooth
Reference- Hall and Goodwin, 2007. A preliminary analysis of dinosaur teeth from the Mugher Mudstone of Ethiopia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 86A.

undescribed possible Neotheropoda (Li and Gao, 2007)
Barremian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Sinuiju Series, North Korea

Comments- Li and Gao (2007) reported theropods from the Sinuijiu Series, while Gao et al. (2009) stated "possible theropod dinosaurs" had been discovered there.
References- Li and Gao, 2007. Lower Cretaceous vertebrate fauna from the Sinuiju basin, North Korea as evidence of geographic extension of the Jehol biota into the Korean peninsula. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 106A.
Gao, Li, Wei, Pak and Pak, 2009. Early Cretaceous birds and pterosaurs from the Sinuiju series, and geographic extension of the Jehol biota into the Korean peninsula. Journal of the Paleontological Society of Korea. 25(1), 57-61.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Bonde, 2008)
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Willow Tank Formation, Nevada, US
Material
- teeth
Reference- Bonde, 2008. Paleoecology and taphonomy of the Willow Tank Formation (Albian), southern Nevada. Masters thesis, Montana State University. 96 pp.

unnamed possible Neotheropoda (Lindgren, Currie, Rees, Siverson, Lindström and Alwmark, 2008)
Early Berriasian, Early Cretaceous
Skyttegaard Member of the Rabekke Formation, Denmark
Material
- (MGUH 28410a-d) fragmented premaxillary tooth
(MGUH coll.) tooth fragment
Comments- Lindgren et al. (2008) referred a-d to Maniraptora incertae sedis, noting the varying serration size is found in taxa with normally serrationless teeth.
References- Lindgren, Currie, Rees, Siverson, Lindström and Alwmark, 2008. Theropod dinosaur teeth from the lowermost Cretaceous Rabekke Formation on Bornholm, Denmark. Geobios. 41, 253-263.
Bonde, 2012. Danish dinosaurs: A review. In Godefroit (ed.). Bernissart Dinosaurs and Early Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. Indiana University Press. 434-451.

unnamed neotheropod (Watabe, Tsogtbaatar and Barsbold, 2008)
Late Jurassic
Dariv Suite, Mongolia
Material
- (IGM 107/5) fragmentary maxillae, fragmentary dentary
Reference- Watabe, Tsogtbaatar and Barsbold, 2008. First discovery of a theropod (Dinosauria) from the Upper Jurassic in Mongolia and its stratigraphy. Paleontological Research. 12(1), 27-36.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Benson, 2009)
Middle Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Taynton Limestone Formation (=Stonesfield Slate), England

Material- (OUM J12003) proximal tibia
(OUM J29776) tooth
(OUM J29778) tooth
Comments- OUM J12003 is a tibia which differs from Megalosaurus in being smaller, with a thin fibular crest. Benson suggested it may be the same taxon as the tetanurine distal tibia MB R 2351. OUM J29776 is a tooth which differs from Megalosaurus in having a much higher serration density- 18 per 5 mm mesially and 18.5 per 5 mm mesially. Faint enamel wrinkles are present and the mesial serrations extend 40% of the crown length. OUM J29778 also has fine serrations- 14.5 per 5 mm on both carinae, and has mesial serrations over half the crown length. Both are smaller than Megalosaurus and have interdenticular sulci which are are short and perpendicular to the carinae.
Reference- Benson, 2009. An assessment of variability in theropod dinosaur remains from the Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) of Stonesfield and New Park Quarry, UK and taxonomic implications for Megalosaurus bucklandii and Iliosuchus incognitus. Palaeontology. 52(4), 857-877.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Eberth, Kobayashi, Lee, Mateus, Therrien, Zelenitsky and Norell, 2009)
Santonian-Campanian?, Late Cretaceous
Javkhlant Formation, Mongolia

Comments- Eberth et al. (2009) noted "small nonavian theropod dinosaur skeletal remains" and "several taxa of variously-sized theropod dinosaurs" from the Javkhlant Formation, of which only Albinykus has been described so far. Based on their location and age, these are probably all coelurosaurs.
Reference- Eberth, Kobayashi, Lee, Mateus, Therrien, Zelenitsky and Norell, 2009. Assignment of Yamaceratops dorngobiensis and associated redbeds at Shine Us Khudag (eastern Gobi, Dorngobi Province, Mongolia) to the redescribed Javkhlant Formation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(1), 295-302.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Knoll and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2009)
Beriassian, Early Cretaceous
Ksar Metlili Formation, Morocco
Material
- (MNHN SA 2004/2A) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA 2004/2C) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA 2004/2D) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA 2004/2E) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA 2004/2F) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA 2004/2G) partial tooth
(MNHN SA 2004/3B) tooth fragment (4.9x?x1.6 mm)
(MNHN SA 2004/4A) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA 2004/5C) partial tooth
(MNHN SA 2004/5D) tooth fragment
(MNHN SA mcm 167) tooth fragment (4x?x1.2 mm)
Reference- Knoll and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2009. Theropod teeth from the basalmost Cretaceous of Anoual (Morocco) and their palaeobiogeographical significance. Geological Magazine. 146(4), 602-616.

undescribed neotheropod (Lubbe, Richter and Knotschke, 2009)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Langenberg Quarry, Germany
Material
- ?(DFMMh/FV 707.1) partial tooth (Lubbe, Richter and Knötschke, 2009)
Comments- While seven teeth assigned to Velociraptorinae by Lubbe et al. (2009), Gerke and Wings (2014) found four of these were Neotheropoda indet., megalosaurid and tyrannosauroid. Based on the information in Lubbe et al., FV 707.1 may be indet. (larger and only partially preserved).
References- Lubbe, Richter and Knötschke, 2009. Velociraptorine dromaeosaurid teeth from the Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) of Germany. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 54(3), 401-408.
Gerke and Wings, 2014. Characters versus morphometrics: A case study with isolated theropod teeth from the Late Jurassic of Lower Saxony, Germany, reveals an astonishing diversity of theropod taxa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2014, 137

undescribed neotheropod (Ortega, Escaso, Perez Garcia, Torices and Sanz, 2009)
Late Campanian-Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Villalba de la Sierra Formation, Spain
Material
- cranial and postcranial elements
Comments- Ortega et al. (2009) refer to this as a 'basal large theropod', which given the provenence is most likely an abelisaurid.
Reference- Ortega, Escaso, Perez Garcia, Torices and Sanz, 2009. The vertebrate diversity of the Upper Campanian-Lower Maastrichtian "Lo Hueco" fossil-site (Cuenca, Spain). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 159A-160A.

undescribed Theropoda (Bardet, Pereda Suberbiola, Jouve, Bourdon, Vincent, Houssaye, Rage, Jalil, Bouya and Amaghzaz, 2010)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Couche 3, Morocco

Material- two teeth
Comments- Supposed to be described in Pereda-Suberbiola et al. (in prep.).
Reference- Bardet, Pereda Suberbiola, Jouve, Bourdon, Vincent, Houssaye, Rage, Jalil, Bouya and Amaghzaz, 2010. Reptilian assemblages from the Latest Cretaceous - Palaeogene phosphates of Morocco: From Arambourg to present time. Historical Biology. 22(1), 186-199.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Ikegami, 2010)
Coniacian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Upper Formation of Mifune Group, Japan
Comments
- Ikegami (2010) report two bonebeds, one containing isolated theropod elements, and another preserving three theropod lineages.
Reference- Ikegami, 2010. Taphonomy and sedimentology of a bonebed from the Upper Cretaceous Mifune Group in Kyushu, Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2010, 109A-110A.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Santos-Cubedo, Poza, Suner and de Santisteban, 2010)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Arcillas de Morella Formation, Spain
Material
- teeth (Santos-Cubedo, Poza, Suner and de Santisteban, 2010)
proximal chevron (268 mm) (Selles, Santos-Cubedo and Poza, 2011)
References- Santos-Cubedo, Poza, Suner and de Santisteban, 2010. New remains of a titanosaur (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2010, 157A.
Selles, Santos-Cubedo and Poza, 2011. Injury in a theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 192.

Unnamed Neotheropoda (Jasinski, Sullivan and Lucas, 2011)
Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Naashoibito Member of Ojo Alamo Formation, New Mexico, US

Material- (NMMNH P-28367) incomplete tooth
(NMMNH P-28369) incomplete tooth
(SMP VP-1318) incomplete caudal vertebra
(SMP VP-2069) partial ?premaxillary tooth (?x7x5 mm)
(SMP VP-2176) incomplete caudal centrum
(SMP VP-2434) ?cranial fragment
(SMP VP-2435) ?cranial fragment
(SMP VP-2500) two ?parietal fragments, braincase fragment
(SMP VP-2521) ?cranial fragment
(SMP VP-2626) (medium to large) incomplete vertebra, fragments
(SMP VP-2709) incomplete metatarsal
(SMP VP-2781) incomplete pedal ungual
(SMP VP-2788) pedal ungual
(SMP VP-3357) pedal phalanx ?III-1
Reference- Jasinski, Sullivan and Lucas, 2011. Taxonomic composition of the Alamo Wash local fauna from the Upper Cretaceous Ojo Alamo Formation (Naashoibito Member), San Juan Basin, New Mexico. In Sullivan, Lucas and Spielmann (eds.). Fossil Record 3. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 53, 216-271.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Rejcek, 2011)
Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Cape Lamb Member of the Snow Hill Island Formation, Vega Island, Antarctica
Material
- (MLP 15-I-7-2) pedal phalanx III-1 (Coria, O'Gorman, Cardenas, Mors, Chornogubsky and Lopez, 2015)
tooth (Rejcek, 2011)
References- Rejcek, 2011. Big haul: Paleontologists return from Antarctic expedition with about 200 fossils. The Antarctic Sun. 11-16-2011.
Coria, O'Gorman, Cardenas, Mors, Chornogubsky and Lopez, 2015. New dinosaur records from the Upper Cretaceous of Vega Island, Antarctica. XXIX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontología de Vertebrados, resumenes. Ameghiniana. 52(4) suplemento, 13.

undescribed neotheropod (D'Emic, 2012)
Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Paluxy Formation of the Trinity Group, Texas, US
Material
- (SMU 61741) squamosal
Comments- D'Emic's paper was published electronically in 2012 with a ZooBank registration, but not physically until 2013.
References- D'Emic, 2013. Revision of the sauropod dinosaurs of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group, southern USA, with the description of a new genus. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 11(6), 707-726.

undescribed neotheropod (Pol and Rauhut, 2012)
Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Canadon Asfalto Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- three cervical vertebrae
Reference- Pol and Rauhut, 2012. A Middle Jurassic abelisaurid from Patagonia and the early diversification of theropod dinosaurs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 279(1741), 3170-3175.

undescribed neotheropod (Templeman and Williamson, 2013)
Santonian-Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Menefee Formation, New Mexico, US
Material
- fragmentary postcrania
Reference- Templeman and Williamson, 2013. A vertebrate fauna from the Santonian-Lower Campanian Menefee Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2013, 224.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Averianov, Skutschas, Danilov, Krasnolutskii and Martin, 2014)
Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Upper Itat Formation, Russia
Material
- teeth
Reference- Averianov, Skutschas, Danilov, Krasnolutskii and Martin, 2014. Non-mammalian vertebrate assemblage from the Middle Jurassic of Berezovsk Quarry in Western Siberia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2014, 83.

unnamed neotheropod (Fanti, Cau, Martinelli and Contessi, 2014)
Late Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Chenini or Oum Ed Diab Member of the Chenini Formation, Tunisia
Material
- (MGGCTUN coll.; Morphotype 1) two anterior teeth (60-68 mm) [check Fanti et al. for details]
(MGGCTUN coll.; Morphotype 7) (juvenile?) two lateral teeth (14-20 mm) [check Fanti et al. for details]
Reference- Fanti, Cau, Martinelli and Contessi, 2014. Integrating palaeoecology and morphology in theropod diversity estimation: A case from the Aptian-Albian of Tunisia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 410, 39-57.

Undescribed neotheropod (Godefroit, Sinitsa, Dhouailly, Bolotsky, Sizov, McNamara, Benston and Spagna, 2014)
Bajocian-Tithonian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Ukureyshaya Formation, Russia
Holotype
-(INREC K coll.) (medium-sized) tooth
Comments- Godefroit et al. (2014) report that besides the numerous specimens of Kulindadromeus preserved in the Kulinda bonebeds, only a single shed theropod tooth is present. Two specimens were referred to Theropoda by Alifanov- PIN 5435/51 (distal caudal vertebrae with associated scales) and a specimen that consists of three distal metapodials, phalanges and scales. These were later named Lepidocheirosaurus by Alifanov and Saveliev (2015), but one and probably both are Kulindadromeus specimens (see entry).
References- Alifanov, 2014. The discovery of Late Jurassic dinosaurs in Russia. Doklady Earth Sciences. 455(2), 365-367.
Godefroit, Sinitsa, Dhouailly, Bolotsky, Sizov, McNamara, Benston and Spagna, 2014. A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales. Science. 345(6195), 451-455.
Alifanov and Saveliev, 2015. The most ancient ornithomimosaur (Theropoda, Dinosauria), with cover imprints from the Upper Jurassic of Russia. Paleontological Journal. 49(6), 636-650.

undescribed neotheropod (Filippi, Martinelli and Garrido, 2015)
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Bajo de la Carpa Formation of the Rio Colorado Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina

Material- (MAU-Pv-N 496/1) tooth
Reference- Filippi, Martinelli and Garrido, 2015. Una nueva asociación de dientes vertebrados para la Formación Bajo de la Carpa (Santoniense, Cretácico Superior) en Rincón de los Sauces, Neuquén, Argentina. Revista Española de Paleontología. 30(2), 223-238.

undescribed neotheropod (Gasparini, Sterli, Parras, O'Gorman, Salgado, Varela and Pol, 2015)
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
La Colonia Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- (MPEF-PV 10829) incomplete metatarsal III, partial metatarsal IV, distal metatarsal
Reference- Gasparini, Sterli, Parras, O'Gorman, Salgado, Varela and Pol, 2015. Late Cretaceous reptilian biota of the La Colonia Formation, central Patagonia, Argentina: Occurrences, preservation and paleoenvironments. Cretaceous Research. 54, 154-168.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Haddoumi, Allain, Meslouh, Metais, Monbaron, Pons, Rage, Vullo, Zouhri and Gheerbrant, 2015)
Early Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Anoual Formation, Morocco
Material
- (GEA 2-5) incomplete tooth
(GEA coll.) few incomplete teeth
Comments- Haddoumi et al. (2015) noted these small teeth were labiolingually compressed with serrated mesial and distal carinae
Reference- Haddoumi, Allain, Meslouh, Metais, Monbaron, Pons, Rage, Vullo, Zouhri and Gheerbrant, 2015. Guelb el Ahmar (Bathonian, Anoual Syncline, eastern Morocco): First continental flora and fauna including mammals from the Middle Jurassic of Africa. Gondwana Research. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gr.2014.12.004

undescribed Neotheropoda (Hirayama, Takisawa, Sasaki, Sonoda, Yoshida, Takekawa, Mitsuzuka, Kobayashi, Tsuihiji and Tsutsumi, 2015)
Early Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Tamagawa Formation of the Kuji Group, Japan
Material
- limb elements
Reference- Hirayama, Takisawa, Sasaki, Sonoda, Yoshida, Takekawa, Mitsuzuka, Kobayashi, Tsuihiji and Tsutsumi, 2015. Terrestrial vertebrates from the Late Cretaceous (Santonian) of Iwate prefecture, eastern Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2015, 143-144.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Lanser and Heimhofer, 2015)
Late Barremian-Early Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Balve-Beckum quarry, Germany
Material
- (LWL MN Ba 1; Morphotype B) partial lateral tooth (?x16.5x7.8 mm)
(LWL MN Ba 2; Morphotype B) partial lateral tooth (?x5.9x3.7 mm)
(LWL MN Ba 3; Morphotype B) partial lateral tooth
(LWL MN Ba 4; Morphotype B) lateral tooth (14.3x9.9x4.8 mm)
(LWL MN Ba 4a; Morphotype B) lateral tooth fragment
(LWL MN Ba 16; Morphotype A) lateral tooth fragment
(LWL MN Ba 18; Morphotype A) lateral tooth fragment
(LWL MN Ba 19; Morphotype A) lateral tooth fragment
(LWL MN Ba 20; Morphotype A) partial lateral tooth (?x8.3x4.1 mm)
(LWL MN Ba 22; Morphotype A) lateral tooth fragment
Reference- Lanser and Heimhofer, 2015. Evidence of theropod dinosaurs from a Lower Cretaceous karst filling in the northern Sauerland (Rhenish Massif, Germany). Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 89(1), 79-94.

unnamed neotheropod (Mo and Xu, 2015)
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Creyaceous
Nanxiong Group, Jiangxi, China
Material
- (NHMG 8500) maxillary tooth (91 x 45.2 x 21 mm)
Comments- Mo and Xu (2015) referred this tooth to Theropoda indet., stating it was most likely carcharodontosaurid or tyrannosaurid. As it is far more labiolingually compressed than tyrannosaurids, large and serrated without strong carcharodontosaurine wrinkles, it seems most likely to be a basal carcharodontosaurid or megaraptoran.
Reference- Mo and Xu, 2015. Large theropod teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of Jiangxi, southern China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 53(1), 63-72.

unnamed neotheropod (Poropat, Einarsson, Lindgren, Bazzi, Lagerstam and Kear, 2015)
Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Ugnsmunnarna, Sweden
Material
- (LO 12095t) incomplete tibia
Reference- Poropat, Einarsson, Lindgren, Bazzi, Lagerstam and Kear, 2015. Late Cretaceous dinosaurian remains from the Kristianstad Basin of southern Sweden. In Kear, Lindgren, Hurum, Milàn and Vajda (eds.). Geological Society, London, Special Publications. 434, http://doi.org/10.1144/SP434.8

undescribed Neotheropoda (Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015)
Late Cretaceous
unknown formation, Arenales, Mexico
Material
- (uncollected) vertebrae
(uncollected) caudal vertebrae
Late Cretaceous
unknown formation, Palau, Mexico

(IGM coll.) tooth
Reference- Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015. Diversity of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from Mexico. Boletín Geológico y Minero. 126(1), 63-108.

undescribed neotheropod (Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015)
Campanian, Late Cretaceous
San Carlos Formation, Mexico
Material
- (IGM coll.) phalanx
Reference- Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015. Diversity of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from Mexico. Boletín Geológico y Minero. 126(1), 63-108.

undescribed neotheropod (Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015)
Late Campanian-Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Olmos Formation, Mexico
Material
- (IGM coll.) tooth fragments
Reference- Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015. Diversity of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from Mexico. Boletín Geológico y Minero. 126(1), 63-108.

undescribed Neotheropoda (Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015)
Late Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Cabullona Group, Mexico
Material
- (MPF coll.) metatarsal fragment
(MPF coll.) phalanx fragment
Reference- Ramirez-Valesco and Hernandez-Rivera, 2015. Diversity of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from Mexico. Boletín Geológico y Minero. 126(1), 63-108.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Schwimmer, Sanders, Erickson and Weems, 2015)
Middle Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Coachman Formation, South Carolina, US
Material
- (ChM PV7366) distal ?metatarsal
(ChM PV8833) limb shaft fragment
(ChM PV9149) distal ?humerus
(ChM PV9150) distal ?tibia
Comments- ChM PV7366 was listed twice in the materials list, once as a manual phalanx. Schwimmer et al. (2015) assign the supposed humeral and tibial ends to ?Maniraptora indet., though one condyle of the second specimen is far more ventrally projected unlike most tibiae.
Reference- Schwimmer, Sanders, Erickson and Weems, 2015. A Late Cretaceous dinosaur and reptile assemblage from South Carolina, USA. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society. 105(2), 157 pp.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Aren Formation, Spain
Material
- (MPZ98/68; Morphotype 2) tooth (18x16x? mm)
(MPZ2004/3; Morphotype 1) tooth (19.5x15x9.5 mm)
(MPZ2004/4; Morphotype 1) tooth (45x24x12.5 mm)
Reference- Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015. Theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Pyrenees Basin of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(3), 611-626.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015)
Late Campanian-Early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Sedano Formation, Spain
Material
- (MCNA-1852; Morphotype 1) tooth (45x15x9 mm)
(MCNA-1853; Morphotype 2) tooth (24x13x7.3 mm)
(MCNA-14520; Morphotype 1) tooth (46x15x9 mm)
(MCNA-14521; Morphotype 1) tooth (62x16x8 mm)
(MCNA-14522; Morphotype 2) tooth (20x12x6.2 mm)
(MCNA-22051; Morphotype 1) tooth (43x19x8.9 mm)
Reference- Torices, Currie, Canudo and Pereda-Suberbiola, 2015. Theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Pyrenees Basin of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(3), 611-626.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Wings, Tutken, Fowler, Martin, Pfretzschner and Sun, 2015)
Callovian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Qigu Formation, Xinjiang, China
Material
- (PMOL-SGP 2004/2) (multiple individuals) tooth fragments
(PMOL-SGP 2005/1) tooth 918 mm)
Reference- Wings, Tutken, Fowler, Martin, Pfretzschner and Sun, 2015. Dinosaur teeth from the Jurassic Qigu and Shishugou Formations of the Junggar Basin (Xinjiang/China) and their paleoecologic implications. Palaontologische Zeitschrift. 89(3), 485-502.

unnamed Neotheropoda (Wings, Tutken, Fowler, Martin, Pfretzschner and Sun, 2015)
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Shishugou Formation, Xinjiang, China
Material
- (PMOL-SGP 2006/2) lateral tooth (46 mm)
(PMOL-SGP 2006/3) lateral tooth (17 mm)
(PMOL-SGP 2006/4) anterior tooth (15 mm)
Reference- Wings, Tutken, Fowler, Martin, Pfretzschner and Sun, 2015. Dinosaur teeth from the Jurassic Qigu and Shishugou Formations of the Junggar Basin (Xinjiang/China) and their paleoecologic implications. Palaontologische Zeitschrift. 89(3), 485-502.

undescribed neotheropod (Xu, Zheng, Sullivan, Wang, Xing, Wang, Zhang, O'Connor, Zhang and Pan, 2015)
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Tiaojishan Formation, Hebei, China
Material
- (IVPP V20796) (small) skeleton
Reference- Xu, Zheng, Sullivan, Wang, Xing, Wang, Zhang, O'Connor, Zhang and Pan, 2015. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran theropod with preserved evidence of membranous wings. Nature. 521, 70-73.