Sauropodomorpha Huene, 1932
Definition- (Plateosaurus engelhardti, Diplodocus longus <- Passer domesticus) (modified from Upchurch, 1997)
Other definitions- (Plateosaurus engelhardti + Saltasaurus loricatus) (Wilson, 2005; modified from Sereno, 1998; modified from Salgado et al., 1997)
(Plateosaurus engelhardti + Morosaurus impar) (modified from Kischlat, 2000; modified from Salgado et al., 1997)
(Saltasaurus loricatus <- Allosaurus fragilis) (modified from Galton and Upchurch, 2004)
(Saltasaurus loricatus <- Passer domesticus, Triceratops horridus) (Sereno, 2007)
= Arctopoda Haeckel, 1895 preoccupied Butler, 1883
= Palaeosauria Haeckel, 1895 preoccupied Seeley, 1882
= Pachypodosauria Huene, 1914 sensu Kischlat, 2000
Definition- (Morosaurus impar <- Allosaurus fragilis) (modified)
= Allophagi Jaekel, 1914
= Pachypodosauroidea Nopcsa, 1928
?= Prosauropoides Lapparent and Lavocat, 1955
= Palaeopoda Colbert, 1964 preoccupied Packard, 1903
= Brontosauria Olshevsky, 1991
= Sauropodomorpha sensu Sereno, 2007
Definition- (Saltasaurus loricatus <- Passer domesticus, Triceratops horridus)
Comments- Jaekel (1914) used Allophagi for plateosaurids, cetiosaurids, morosaurids, diplodocids and atlantosaurids, but not anchisaurids, zanclodontids or theropods. Huene (1914) erected Pachypodosauria for carnosaurs and sauropodomorphs, to the exclusion of coelurosaurs. This makes Kischlat's (2000) definition problematic, as he explicitly excludes the type carnosaur Allosaurus. Nopcsa (1928) later used Pachypodosauroidea (invalid, as there is no genus Pachypodosaurus) for basal sauropodomorphs. Colbert (1964) named Palaeopoda for a paraphyletic group of basal sauropodomorphs, but the name is preoccupied by an arthropod group equivalent to Arachnomorpha (Packard, 1903). Though Colbert's paper is often credited with first using Palaeosauria as a group of carnivorous basal sauropodomorphs, this usage goes back to Haeckel (1895). Seeley (1876) had earlier used Palaeosauria for group equal to Amphibia and Reptilia, and later (1882) for a group containing all reptiles except squamates. Haeckel (1895) also used Arctopoda as a grade of basal dinosaurs/sauropodomorphs (including prodinosaurs, palaeosaurs, zanclodonts and anchisaurs), but this is preoccupied by a genus of moth (Butler, 1883). Excepting misspellings of Brontosaurus and popular usage, Olshevsky (1991) is the first to use Brontosauria as a taxonomic group. He proposed it for non-segnosaurian sauropodomorphs, but since segnosaurs are now known to be theropods, Brontosauria becomes synonymous with Sauropodomorpha.
References- Seeley, 1876. On the posterior portion of a lower jaw of Labyrinthodon (L. lavisi), from the Trias of Sidmouth. The Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 32, 278-284.
Seeley, 1882. On Neusticosaurus pusillus (Fraas), an amphibious reptile having affinities with the terrestrial Nothosauria and with the marine Plesiosauria. The Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 38, 350-366.
Butler, 1883. Heterocerous Lepidoptera collected in Chili by Thomas Edmonds, Esq.. The Transactions of the Entomological Society of London. 1883, 49-90.
Haeckel, 1895. Systematische Phylogenie der Wirbelthiere: (Vertebrata). 660 pp.
Packard, 1903. Hints on the classification of the Arthropoda, the group a phylogenetic one. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 42(173), 142-161.
Jaekel, 1914. Über die Wirbeltierfunde in der oberen Trias von Halberstadt. Palaontologische Zeitschrift. 1(1), 155-215.
Nopcsa, 1928. The genera of reptiles. Palaeobiologica. 1, 163-188.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre entwicklung und geschichte. Monographien zur Geologia und Palaeontologie. 1, 1-362.
Lapparent and Lavocat, 1955. Dinosauriens. in Piveteau (ed.). Traite de Paleontologie. Masson, Paris. 5, 785-962.
Colbert, 1964. Relationships of the saurischian dinosaurs. American Museum Novitates. 2181, 1-24.
Olshevsky, 1991. A Revision of the Parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, Excluding the Advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Salgado, Coria and Calvo, 1997. Evolution of titanosaurid sauropods. I: Phylogenetic analysis based on the postcranial evidence. Ameghiniana. 34(1), 3-32.
Upchurch, 1997. Sauropodomorpha. Currie and Padian (eds.). Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs. Academic Press, San Diego. 658-660.
Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 210, 41-83.
Kischlat, 2000. Tecodoncios: A aurora dos Arcosaurios no Triassico. in Holz and De Rose (eds.). Paleontologia do Rio Grande do Sul. 273-316.
Galton and Upchurch, 2004. Prosauropoda. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (second edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 232-258.
Wilson, 2005. Overview of sauropod phylogeny and evolution. in Curry Rogers and Wilson (eds.). The Sauropods: Evolution and Paleobiology. University of California Press, Berkeley. 15-49.
Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.

Aetonyx

Agrosaurus

Aristosaurus

Asylosaurus

Dimodosaurus

Dromicosaurus

Euskelosaurus? africanus

Fulengidae Carroll and Galton, 1977
Reference- Carroll and Galton, 1977. 'Modern' lizard from the Upper Triassic of China. Nature. 266(5599), 252-255.
Fulengia
Comments- Though synonymized with Lufengosaurus huangi by Evans and Milner (1989), Fulengia lacks the two cranial autapomorphies of that species for which it can be scored (distinct tuberosity on lateral surface of ascending process of maxilla; low boss on central portion of jugal at junction of the three jugal processes). This may be ontogenetic, but the recent recognition that taxa such as "Gyposaurus" sinensis and Lufengosaurus? magnus may not be synonymous with L. huangi makes Fulengia's identity more questionable, as does the discovery of new genera such as Jingshanosaurus and Kunmingosaurus. Further study is needed.
References- Carroll and Galton, 1977. 'Modern' lizard from the Upper Triassic of China. Nature. 266(5599), 252-255.
Evans and Milner, 1989. Fulengia, a supposed early lizard reinterpreted as a prosauropod dinosaur. Palaeontology. 32(1), 223-230.

Gigantoscelis

Gresslyosaurus? plieningeri

Gresslyosaurus? robustus

Gryponyx? taylori

Gryponyx? transvaalensis

Gyposaurus

Hortalotarsus

Leptospondylus

Orosaurus

Pachysaurops
P. ajax
P? giganteus
P? magnus
P? wetzelianus

Pachyspondylus

Plateosaurus? erlenbergiensis

Plateosaurus? reiningeri

Plateosaurus? quenstedti

Sellosaurus? fraasi

"Teratosaurus" minor

"Teratosaurus" trossingensis

Thecodontosaurus? fraserianus

Thecodontosaurus? hermannianus

Guaibasauridae Bonaparte, Ferigolo and Ribeiro, 1999
Definition- (Guaibasaurus candelariensis <- Carnotaurus sastrei, Saltasaurus loricatus) (Ezcurra, 2010)
Comments- Bonaparte et al. (1999) erected this as a monotypic family of basal saurischians, but Bonaparte et al. (2007) later referred Saturnalia to it in addition to Guaibasaurus. Recently this family was supported in the analysis of Ezcurra (2010), who found it to be a basal sauropodomorph clade containing Guaibasaurus, Panphagia, Saturnalia, Chromogisaurus and Agnosphitys. Reanalysis of Ezcurra's matrix with more taxa and characters does place his guaibasaurid taxa within Sauropodomorpha, but leaves Guaibasaurus, Panphagia, Agnosphitys and Saturnaliinae in a polytomy.
References- Bonaparte, Ferigolo and Ribeiro, 1999. A new early Late Triassic saurischian dinosaur from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaurs Symposium. National Science Museum Monographs, Tokyo. 15, 89-109.
Bonaparte, Brea, Schultz and Martinelli, 2007. A new specimen of Guaibasaurus candelariensis (basal Saurischia) from the Late Triassic Caturrita Formation of southern Brazil. Historical Biology. 19(1), 73-82.
Ezcurra and Novas, 2009. Guaibasauridae, a new clade of Triassic basal sauropodomorphs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 92A.
Ezcurra, 2010. A new early dinosaur (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha) from the Late Triassic of Argentina: A reassessment of dinosaur origin and phylogeny. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(3), 371-425.

Guaibasaurus Bonaparte, Ferigolo and Ribeiro, 1999
G. candelariensis Bonaparte, Ferigolo and Ribeiro, 1999
Late Norian, Late Triassic
Caturrita Formation, Brazil
Holotype
- (MCN-PV 2355) five incomplete dorsal centra (22 mm), three incomplete mid dorsal neural arches, five incomplete dorsal ribs, incomplete first sacral centrum (29), incomplete second sacral centrum (19 mm), ten incomplete proximal caudal vertebrae (31 mm), several proximal chevrons (39 mm), incomplete scapula (116 mm), partial coracoid (28 mm), ilia (one incomplete, one fragmentary; ~87 mm), incomplete pubes (136 mm), incomplete ischia (131 mm), incomplete femora (~214 mm), incomplete tibiae (~212 mm), incomplete fibulae (~207 mm), fragmentary astragali, calcanea (one fragmentary), fragmentary distal tarsals, metatarsals I (57 mm), phalanges I-1, pedal unguals I, metatarsals II (85 mm), phalanges II-1, phalanges II-2, pedal unguals II, metatarsals III (95 mm), phalanges III-1, phalanges III-2, phalanges III-3, pedal unguals III, metatarsals IV (83 mm), phalanges IV-1, phalanges IV-2, phalanges IV-3, phalanges IV-4, pedal unguals IV, metatarsals V (41 mm)
Paratype- (MCN-PV 2356) incomplete tibia, incomplete fibula, astragalus (40 mm across), calcaneum (16 mm across), distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, pedal ungual I, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, pedal ungual II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, pedal ungual III, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4, pedal ungual IV, metatarsal V
Referred- (MCN-PV coll.) metacarpal I (~29 mm) (Bittencourt Rodrigues, 2010)
(UFRGS PV0725T) thirteen dorsal vertebrae (36 mm), twenty-three partial dorsal ribs, gastralia, four fragmentary sacral vertebrae, eighteen caudal vertebrae (sixth and eighth caudals 27 mm), ten chevrons, partial scapulae, partial coracoids, partial humeri (~145 mm), incomplete radius, incomplete ulna (~92 mm), two incomplete manus including metacarpal I (~24 mm), phalanx I-1 (~30 mm), manual ungual I (~30 mm), metacarpal II (~35 mm), phalanx II-1 (~28 mm), phalanx II-2 (~25 mm), manual ungual II (~36 mm), metacarpal III (~31 mm), phalanx III-2, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, manual ungual III, metacarpal IV, ilia, pubes, ischia, femora (270 mm), incomplete tibiae, incomplete fibulae, partial astragali, partial calcanea, two pes including metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, pedal ungual II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, pedal ungual III, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4, pedal ungual IV (Bonaparte, Brea, Schultz and Martinelli, 2007)
Comments- This taxon was described as a saurischian perhaps basal to both sauropodomorphs and theropods, or perhaps a basal sauropodomorph itself, by Bonaparte et al. (1999) (who nonetheless lists it as ?Theropoda in the systematic section). Bonaparte et al. (2007) had a similar conclusion, though neither of these papers used a cladistic system. Langer (2004) and Yates (2007) found it to be a theropod basal to avepods in their analyses, with Yates further finding it to be more derived than Agnosphitys and less than Chindesaurus. However, neither of these analyses use the new forelimb data of UFRGS PV0725T. The latter was used by Bittencourt Rodrigues (2010) and Ezcurra (2010), who found it to be a basal theropod and a basal sauropodomorph respectively.
References- Bonaparte, Ferigolo and Ribeiro, 1999. A new early Late Triassic saurischian dinosaur from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaurs Symposium. National Science Museum Monographs, Tokyo. 15, 89-109.
Langer, 2004. Basal Saurischia. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska. The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 861 pp.
Bonaparte, Brea, Schultz and Martinelli, 2007. A new specimen of Guaibasaurus candelariensis (basal Saurischia) from the Late Triassic Caturrita Formation of southern Brazil. Historical Biology. 19(1), 73-82.
Langer, Bittencourt and Schultz, 2007. The inclusivity and phylogenetic position of Guaibasaurus candelariensis: A basal dinosaur from the Late Triassic of Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 103A.
Yates, 2007. Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: the identity of Aliwalia rex Galton. Historical Biology. 19(1), 93-123.
Bittencourt Rodrigues, 2010. Revisao filogenetica dos dinossauriformes basais: Implicacoes para a origem dod dinossauros. Unpublished Doctoral Thesis. Universidade de Sao Paulo. 288 pp.
Ezcurra, 2010. A new early dinosaur (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha) from the Late Triassic of Argentina: A reassessment of dinosaur origin and phylogeny. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(3), 371-425.

unnamed basal sauropodomorph (Kutty, Jain and Chowdhury, 1987; described by Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011)
Late Norian-Early Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Upper Maleri Formation, India
Material
- (ISI R277) two cervical vertebrae, partial last dorsal neural arch, three sacral vertebrae, ilia (one fragmentary), femora (one partial), tibia, astragalus, incomplete metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, metatarsal II, incomplete phalanx II-1, incomplete metatarsal III, incomplete metatarsal IV, metatarsal V
Comments- This was first called Massospondylus sp. by Kutty et al. (1987), stated to be similar to Guaibasaurus by Kutty et al. (2007) (listed as "Theropod: aff. Guibasauruss[sic]"), then mentioned by Novas et al. (2009) as resembling Guaibasaurus, Saturnalia and Panphagia. It was later described by Novas et al. (2011) as a guaibasaurid, emerging in Yates' sauropodomorph matrix in a polytomy with Panphagia and Guaibasaurus plus saturnaliines.
References- Kutty, Jain and Chowdhury, 1987. Gondwana sequence of the Northern Pranhita-Godavari Valley: Its stratigraphy and vertebrate faunas. The Palaeobotanist. 36, 214-219.
Kutty, Chatterjee, Galton and Upchurch, 2007. Basal sauropodomorphs (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Lower Jurassic of India: Their anatomy and relationships. Journal of Paleontology. 81, 1218-1240.
Novas, Chatterjee, Ezcurra and Kutty, 2009. New dinosaur remains from the Late Triassic of Central India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 156A.
Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011. New dinosaur species from the Upper Triassic Upper Maleri and Lower Dharmaram formations of Central India. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 101, 333-349.

Panphagia Martinez and Alcober, 2009
P. protos Martinez and Alcober, 2009
Late Carnian-Early Norian, Late Triassic
Cancha de Bochas Member of the Ischigualasto Formation, San Juan, Argentina

Holotype- (PVSJ 874) (~1.3 m juvenile) nasal, prefrontal, frontal (43.2 mm), parietals, quadrates (30.4, 30.9 mm), prootic, supraoccipital, mandibles (one incomplete, one partial; ~121.1 mm), fourth(?) cervical vertebra (25.7 mm), seventh(?) cervical vertebra (24.6 mm), eighth(?) cervical vertebra, cervical ribs, four posterior dorsal neural arches, posterior dorsal centrum (19.8 mm), anterior or mid dorsal rib, first primordial sacral vertebra (21.9 mm), two proximal caudal vertebrae, mid caudal vertebra, fifteen distal caudal vertebrae, chevrons, scapula (91.9 mm), incomplete ilium (46.1 mm), incomplete pubis, ischium (113.4 mm), tibia (157 mm), astragalus (25.4 mm transversely), metatarsal III (77.3 mm), proximal metatarsal IV, three pedal phalanges, pedal ungual III
Diagnosis- (after Martinez and Alcober, 2009) anteroposteriorly elongated fossa on base of anteroventral nasal process; wide lateral flange on quadrate with large foramen located far from shaft; deep groove on lateral surface of mandible surrounded by prominent dorsal and ventral ridges, extending from position of ninth tooth to surangular foramen; posteroventral process of dentary bifurcated into slender rami that overlap lateral surface of angular; long retroarticular process of articular transversally wider than articular area for quadrate; oval scars on lateral surface of posterior border of cervical centra; distinct prominences located posterodorsally to diapophyses on anterior cervical neural arches; distal end of scapular blade nearly three times wider than neck; scapular blade with expanded posterodistal corner limited by wedged posterior border; medial lamina of brevis fossa twice wider
than iliac spine.
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 2006 and described briefly by Martinez and Alcober in 2009. Martinez et al. (2013) later described the braincase in depth.
Martinez and Alcober entered it into Langer's dinosaur matrix and recovered it as a sauropodomorph sister to Saturnalia and more derived taxa. It has since been found as a basal sauropodomorph in various positions in other matrices.
References- Martinez and Alcober, 2009. A basal sauropodomorph (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Ischigualasto Formation (Triassic, Carnian) and the early evolution of Sauropodomorpha. PLoS ONE. 4(2), e4397.
Martínez , Haro and Apaldetti, 2013. Braincase of Panphagia protos (Dinosauria, Sauropodomorpha). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32(Supplement to 6), 70-82.

Pampadromaeus Cabreira, Schultz, Bittencourt, Soares, Fortier, Silva and Langer, 2011
P. barberenai Cabreira, Schultz, Bittencourt, Soares, Fortier, Silva and Langer, 2011
Late Carnian-Early Norian, Late Triassic
Alemoa Member of Santa Maria Formation, Brazil

Holotype- (ULBRA-PVT016) incomplete skull, incomplete mandibles, atlantal neurapophysis, four cervical ribs, seven dorsal vertebrae, twelve dorsal ribs, two sacral vertebrae, three proximal caudal vertebrae, four mid caudal vertebrae, nine distal caudal vertebrae, thirteen chevrons, scapulae (one partial), humerus, ulna, ilia (one incomplete), proximal ischium, femora (one incomplete, one partial), partial tibiae, fibulae, metatarsal I, metatarsal II, metatarsal III, pedal phalanges
Referred- femur (CAPPA/UFSM 0027) femur (~142 mm) (Müller, Langer, Cabreira and Silva, 2015)
Diagnosis- (after Cabreira et al., 2011) head longer than two thirds of femoral length; premaxilla with short subnarial process; concave ventral margin of premaxilla-maxilla articulation; premaxilla and dentary with unserrated anteriormost tooth crowns; most teeth lanceolate with coarse denticles along carinae; sacral vertebrae with dorsoventrally expanded ribs; femur with reduced medial tuberosity and well-developed trochanteric shelf, epipodium significantly longer than femur.
(after Muller et al., 2015) distal femur with lateral condyle lateromedially narrow.
Other diagnoses- Cabreira et al. (2011) listed 'no inset of first premaxillary or dentary tooth', but Sereno et al. (2013) noted the first dentary tooth is outside the more posteriorly located alveolus.
Comments- The holotype was discovered by 2006 and initially announced by Langer et al. (2011) . Pampadromaeus was added to four analyses by Cabreira et al. (2011) and found to be a basal sauropodomorph in all.
References- Cabreira, Schultz, Bittencourt, Soares, Fortier, Silva and Langer, 2011. New stem-sauropodomorph (Dinosauria, Saurischia) from the Triassic of Brazil. Naturwissenschaften. 98(12), 1035-1040.
Langer, Cabreira, Bittencourt and Schultz, 2011. A new eusaurischian from the Santa Maria Formation, Late Triassic of Brazil, highlights mosaic pattern of character evolution during the rise of dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2011, 140-141.
Sereno, Martinez and Alcober, 2013. Osteology of Eoraptor lunensis (Dinosauria, Sauropodomorpha). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32(Supplement to 6), 83-179.
Müller, Langer, Cabreira and Silva, 2015. The femoral anatomy of Pampadromaeus barberenai based on a new specimen from the Upper Triassic of Brazil. Historical Biology. DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2015.1004329

Saturnaliinae Ezcurra, 2010
Definition- (Saturnalia tupiniquim + Chromogisaurus novasi) (Ezcurra, 2010)
Reference- Ezcurra, 2010. A new early dinosaur (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha) from the Late Triassic of Argentina: A reassessment of dinosaur origin and phylogeny. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(3), 371-425.

Chromogisaurus Ezcurra, 2010
C. novasi Ezcurra, 2010
Late Carnian-Early Norian, Late Triassic
Cancha de Bochas Member of the Ischigualasto Formation, San Juan, Argentina

Holotype- (PVSJ 845) (subadult or adult) proximal (~4-6) caudal vertebra (24.7 mm), two mid (~14-16) caudal vertebrae (25.4 mm), incomplete proximal chevron, scapulocoracoid fragment, ilia (one incomplete, one fragmentary), femora (one partial, one incomplete), tibiae (one proximal; 175 mm), fibulae (one proximal, one fragmentary), incomplete metatarsal II (~70 mm), phalanx III-2 (19.6 mm), phalanx III-3 (17.1 mm), pedal ungual III
Diagnosis- (after Ezcurra, 2008) low lateral projection of supraacetabular crest; metatarsal II with strongly dorsoventrally asymmetric distal condyles.
(after Ezcurra, 2010) strongly posteriorly developed postacetabular process.
(after Martinez et al., 2013) strongly concave acetabular surface of supraacetabular crest; femoral lateral condyle smaller than medial condyle; medial surface of proximal fibula with elongate rugosity adjacent to anterior margin of shaft.
Other diagnoses- Ezcurra (2010) listed proximal caudals without median notch separating postzygapophyses, but as Martinez et al. (2013) noted the notch is present. The deep and large fossa immediately below the trochanteric shelf listed by Ezcurra (2008, 2010) was determined to be taphonomic by Martinez et al.. The incipiently perforated ilial acetabulum listed by Ezcurra (2010) is also found in Saturnalia, Panphagia, Pampadromaeus, Agnosphitys and Guaibasaurus.
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 1988, initially announced by Ezcurra (2008) then described by him in 2010, and finally redescribed by Martinez et al. (2013). Ezcurra originally identified the chevron as metatarsal V, pedal digit III as II, a rhynchosaur (Scaphonyx?) posterior mandible as a Chromogisaurus' posterior mandible (2008) then as a proximal ulna (2010), and an indeterminate bone possibly not belonging to the taxon as a partial ischium.
Ezcurra (2008, 2010) found Chromogisaurus to be sister to Saturnalia in Guaibasauridae using a version of Yates' matrix. Martinez et al. modified the matrix and still found it sister to Saturnalia, but more derived than Panphagia, the newly included Pampadromaeus and the newly sauropodomorphan Eoraptor.
References- Ezcurra, 2008. A new early dinosaur from the Carnian Ischigualasto Formation (NW Argentina) and the origin of dinosaurs. Libro de Resumenes, III Congreso Latinoamericano de Paleontologýa de Vertebrados. Neuquen, Patagonia, Argentina. 87.
Ezcurra, 2010. A new early dinosaur (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha) from the Late Triassic of Argentina: A reassessment of dinosaur origin and phylogeny. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(3), 371-425.
Martinez, Apaldetti and Abelin, 2013. Basal sauropodomorphs from the Ischigualasto Formation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32(Supplement to 6), 51-69.

Saturnalia Langer, Abdala, Richter and Benton, 1999
S. tupiniquim Langer, Abdala, Richter and Benton, 1999
Late Carnian-Early Norian, Late Triassic
Alemoa Member of Santa Maria Formation, Brazil

Holotype- (MCP 3844-PV) cervical vertebrae 3-10, cervical ribs, fourteen dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, first sacral vertebra (23 mm), second sacral vertebra (25 mm), third sacral vertebra (26 mm), first caudal vertebra, partial scapulacoracoid (scapula 111 mm), humerus (97 mm), radius (61 mm), incomplete ulna, ilia (~90 mm), pubes (127, 121 mm), ischia (121, 132 mm), femora (152, 157 mm), tibia (158 mm), fibula (154 mm), astragalus, calcaneum, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I (46 mm), metatarsal II (70 mm), metatarsal III (84 mm), metatarsal IV (74 mm), metatarsal V (38 mm)
Paratypes- (MCP 3845-PV) partial skull (~100 mm), partial mandible, posterior cervical vertebrae, anterior dorsal vertebrae, incomplete scapulacoracoids (scapula 99, 98 mm), partial humerus (98 mm), proximal ulna, ilium (83 mm), pubis (~102 mm), ischium (~96 mm), femora (156 mm), tibiae (one fragmentary; 155 mm), fibulae (one fragmentary; 154 mm), astragalus, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, partial metatarsal I, partial metatarsals II, pedal ungual II (22 mm), partial metatarsal III, phalanx III-1 (24 mm), phalanx III-2 (19 mm), phalanx III-3 (15 mm), pedal ungual III (~20 mm), partial metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1 (14 mm), phalanx IV-2 (10 mm), phalanx IV-3 (9 mm), phalanx IV-4 (11 mm), pedal ungual IV (~17 mm), metatarsal V (40 mm)
(MCP 3846-PV) dorsal vertebrae, partial tibia, partial fibula, metatarsal IV (73 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Langer et al., 1999) skull about a third of femoral length; lanceolate teeth; deltopectoral crest extends more than half of humeral length; preacetabular process short and pointed; acetabulum not fully opened; deep proximal pubis; lateral pubic border robust and triangular distally; femorotibial ratio subequal; well developed trochanteric shelf; ascendinf process broad and laterally elongated.
(after Langer, 2001) proximal portion of ulna much broader than shaft area (twice as broad anteroposteriorly, three times as broad lateromedially); olecranon process extremely elongated; antitrochanter occupies entire acetabular incisure of that bone; deeply excavated ischio-acetabular groove of pubis; marked distal ridge in posterior process of distal tarsal IV.
Comments- The holotype and paratypes were discovered in 1998.
Not Saturnalia- Langer (2001) referred a proximal femur from the Pebbly Arkose Formation of Zimbabwe to Saturnalia, but Ezcurra (2012) noted the combination of features is more widely distributed so that it can only be identified as Saurischia indet..
References- Langer, Abdala, Richter and Benton, 1999. A sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Upper Triassic (Carnian) of Southern Brazil. Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences, Paris, Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes. 329, 511-517.
Langer, 2001. Saturnalia tupiniquim and the early evolution of dinosaurs. PhD thesis, University of Bristol. 371 pp.
Langer, 2003. The pelvic and hind limb anatomy of the stem-sauropodomorph Saturnalia tupiniquim (Late Triassic, Brazil). Paleobios. 23(2), 1-40.
Langer, 2005. Saturnalia tupiniquim and the origin of sauropodomorphs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(3), 82A.
Langer and Benton, 2006. Early dinosaurs: A phylogenetic study. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 4(4), 309-358.
Langer, Franca and Gabriel, 2007. The pectoral girdle and forelimb anatomy of the stem-sauropodomorph Saturnalia tupiniquim (Upper Triassic, Brazil). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 113-137.
Stein and Langer, 2009. The long bone histology of the stem-sauropodomorph Saturnalia tupiniquim, implications for the early evolution of dinosaur bone microstructure. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 185A.
Ezcurra, 2012. Comments on the taxonomic diversity and paleobiogeography of the earliest known dinosaur assemblages (Late Carnian-Earliest Norian). Historia Natural. 2(1), 49-71.
Bronzati, Langer and Rauhut, 2014. The braincase of Saturnalia tupiniquim and the evolution of the braincase in Sauropodomorpha. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2014, 98.

Sauropodomorpha indet. (Huene, 1932)
Sinemurian, Early Jurassic
Lower Lias, England

Material- (Warwick Museum coll.) distal pubis
Comments- Huene referred a distal pubis to the Warwick specimen he described and referred to Sarcosaurus woodi, but the pubis is not theropod, as the end is extremely flattened anteroposteriorly. It is very similar to sauropodomorphs more derived than Saturnalia, but less than Yunannosaurus, and is here referred to that clade.
Reference- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre entwicklung und geschichte. Monographien zur Geologia und Palaeontologie. 1, 1-362.

Thecodontosauridae Lydekker, 1890
= Thecodontosauria Huxley, 1869
References- Huxley, 1869. Triassic Dinosauria. Nature. 1(1), 23-24.
Lydekker, 1890. Catalogue of the fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum. Part IV. Containing the orders Anomodontia, Ecaudata, Caudata and Labyrinthodontia; and supplement. 295 pp.

Thecodontosaurus Riley and Stutchbury, 1840
T. antiquus Riley and Stutchbury vide Owen, 1842
Holotype- (BRSMG Ca7465; = BCM 1; lost) dentary
Neotype- (BRSMG Ca4529; = BCM 2) dentary (Huxley, 1870)
Referred- (ANSP 9865a) partial posterior dorsal vertebra
(ANSP 9870c) partial mid dorsal neural arch
(BRSMG Cb4154; = BCM 12) partial posterior dorsal vertebra (Benton et al., 2000)
(BRSMG Cb4155; = BCM 11) anterior dorsal neural arch (Benton et al., 2000)
(BRSMG Cb4174b; = BCM 41) partial mid dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Cb4180; = BCM 58) anterior dorsal rib (Benton et al., 2000)
(BRSMG Cb4182; = BCM 69) partial mid dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Cb4196) three partial dorsal ribs (Benton et al., 2000)
(BRSMG Cb4221) partial posterior dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Cb4293) partial posterior dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG C4533; = BCM 8) incomplete posterior dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Ca7452; = BCM 26; lost) partial posterior dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Ca7457e; = BCM 63; lost) posterior cervical rib (Seeley, 1895)
(BRSMG Ca7467) fifth cervical neural arch (Benton et al., 2000)
(BRSMG Ca7469; = BCM 13; lost) partial mid dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Ca7470; = BCM 9; lost) partial posterior dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Ca7471; = BCM 20; lost) incomplete posterior dorsal vertebra
(BRSMG Ca7472; = BCM 16; lost) partial anterior cervical centrum (Huene, 1908)
(BRSMG Ca7496; = BCM 5) distal dorsal rib (Huene, 1908)
(BRSMG Ca7503; = BCM 38; lost) proximal anterior dorsal rib (Riley and Stutchbury, 1840)
(YPM 2192) braincase (Huene, 1908)
(YPM 2195a; holotype of Asylosaurus) partial anterior cervical vertebra, two middle dorsal vertebrae, proximal dorsal rib, (Galton and Cluver, 1976)
(YPM 56719) partial mid dorsal vertebra (Benton et al., 2000)
(YPM 56720) partial fifth cervical vertebra, incomplete sixth cervical vertebra (Huene, 1908)
(YPM 56722) incomplete mid dorsal vertebra (Huene, 1908)
Comments- The type dentary was discovered in 1834, and destroyed in 1940. [referred materials list is incomplete]
References- Anonymous [Conybeare], 1834. Discovery of saurian bones in the Magnesian Conglomerate near Bristol. London, Edinburgh and Dublin. Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. 3(5), 463.
Riley and Stutchbury, 1836a. A description of various remains of three distinct saurian animals discovered in the Autumn of 1834, in the Magnesian Conglomerate on Durdham Down, near Bristol. Proceedings of the Geological Society of London. 2(45), 397-399.
Riley and Stutchbury, 1840. A description of various remains of three distinct saurian animals, recently discovered in the Magnesian Conglomerate near Bristol. Transactions of the Geological Society of London. 2(5), 349-357.
Owen, 1841. Odontography; or a Treatse on the Comparative Anatomy of the Teeth. I. Part II. Dental System of Reptiles. Hippolyte Bailliere, London. 179-295.
Owen, 1842a. Report on British fossil reptiles. Part II. Association for the Advancement of Science, Annual Report for 1841. 9, 60-204.
Huxley, 1870. On the classification of the Dinosauria, with observations on the Dinosauria of the Trias. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 26 : 32-51.
Seeley, 1895. On Thecodontosaurus and Palaeosaurus. Annals and Magazine of Natural History. 6(15), 144-163.
Huene, 1908a. Die Dinosaurier der europäischen Triasformation mit Berücksichtigung der aussereuropäischen Vorkommnisse. Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. , Suppl. 1, 419 pp.
Huene, 1914a. Nachträge zu meinen früheren Beschreibaungen triassicher Saurischia. Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 13, 69-82.
Galton and Cluver, 1976. Anchisaurus capensis (Broom) and a revision of the Anchisauridae (Reptilia, Saurischia). Annals of the South African Museum. 69, 121-159.
Benton, Juul, Storrs and Galton, 2000. Anatomy and systematics of the prosauropod dinosaur Thecodontosaurus antiquus from the Upper Triassic of Southwest England. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20, 71-102.
Galton, 2007. Notes on the remains of archosaurian reptiles, mostly basal sauropodomorph dinosaurs, from the 1834 fissure fill (Rhaetian, Upper Triassic) at Clifton in Bristol, Southwest England. Revue de Paléobiologie. 26(2), 505-591.

Pantydraco

Arcusaurus Yates, Bonnan and Neveling, 2011
A. pereirabdalorum Yates, Bonnan and Neveling, 2011
Pliensbachian, Early Jurassic
Upper Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (BP/1/6235) (at least two individuals; juvenile) maxillary fragment, three maxillary teeth, nasal (38 mm), postorbital, incomplete palatine, dentary (71 mm), supradentary, distal caudal vertebra (18 mm)
Paratypes- ..(BP/1/6842) maxillary tooth
..(BP/1/6843) tooth
..(BP/1/6844) nasal
..(BP/1/6845) incomplete premaxilla
..(BP/1/6846) pedal phalanx ?IV-1
..(BP/1/6847) phalanx
..(BP/1/6848) incomplete pedal ungual I
..(BP/1/6849) incomplete pedal ungual III
..(BP/1/6850) distal humerus
..(BP/1/6851) second or third sacral centrum (31 mm)
..(BP/1/6853) incomplete dentary
..(BP/1/6925) laterosphenoid
..(BP/1/6926) ilial fragment
Diagnosis- (after Yates et al., 2011) horizontal medial shelf projecting from dorsal margin of premaxillary body and offset posteriorly by notch; base of posteromedial premaxillary process expanded into horizontal palatal shelf that protrudes medially to contact its antimere; postorbital with articulation surface for parietal on dorsally projecting, semilunate process; fine ridge on nasal extending from medial edge of prefrontal embayment to a point near center of bone; tongue-shaped anteroventral nasal process; dentary with single enlarged neurovascular foramen opening near anterior tip of lateral surface; distal caudal vertebra with dorsoventrally compressed centrum (anterior central face 1.43 times wider than high).
Comments- The material was discovered between 2004 and 2007 and first reported as a basal sauropodomorph in an abstract (Yates et al., 2007). Yates et al. (2011) described Arcusaurus and found it emerges more derived than Santurnalia and Pantydraco, but outside Thecodontosaurus, Efraasia and plateosaurians in the Yates sauropodomorph matrix. Furthermore, it emerged in a polytomy with Saturnalia, Thecodontosaurus and Plateosauria when added to Upchurch et al.'s sauropodomorph matrix.
While the type individuals are juveniles, Yates et al. found they differ in several ways from Aardonyx that aren't known to vary ontogenetically in other sauropodomorphs. However, it did take only three additional steps to place in Plateosauria, where it emerged sister to Aardonyx plus other sauropodiforms. This surprisingly derived placement just basal to a taxon occuring in the same assemblage is convenient considering juvenile individuals often fall out basally to adults in analyses, so I feel the question of whether Arcusaurus are juvenile Aardonyx remains viable.
References- Yates, Bonnan and Neveling, 2007. A new diverse dinosaur assemblage from the Early Jurassic of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 169A.
Yates, Bonnan and Neveling, 2011. A new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 31(3), 610-625.

Nambalia Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011
N. roychowdhurii Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011
Late Norian-Early Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Upper Maleri Formation, India
Holotype
- (ISI R273/1) incomplete ilium
....(ISI R273/2) femur
....(ISI R273/3) distal tibia, distal fibula, astragalus, calcaneum
Paratypes- (ISI R273/4) partial astragalus, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, pedal ungual I, metatarsal II, metatarsal III, metatarsal IV, metatarsal V, phalanx V-1
....(ISI R273/5/1, 6/2, 7/2-4, 9, 13/2) metacarpal I, phalanx I-1, incomplete manual ungual I, metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, incomplete manual ungual II, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, manual ungual III
....(ISI R273/5/2, 6/3, 7/1, 15) pedal phalanx II-1, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4, pedal ungual IV
....(ISI R273/19-27) ten incomplete caudal vertebrae
....(ISI R273/28) proximal pubis
....(ISI R273/29) ischium
(ISI R273/7/5) manual ungual ?I
....(ISI R273/10) astragalus
....(ISI R273/11/3) manual ungual III
....(ISI R273/12/1, 13/1) metacarpal I, metacarpal II
....(ISI R273/12/2) manual phalanx II-2
....(ISI R273/12/3) manual phalanx III-3
....(ISI R273/13/3) pedal phalanx III-1
....(ISI R273/13/4) pedal ungual III
....(ISI R273/14/1) pedal phalanx I-1
....(ISI R273/14/2) manual phalanx II-1
....(ISI R273/14/3) pedal phalanx IV-2
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2011) femur with almost transversely unexpanded distal end; femur with shallow anterior intercondylar groove; astragalus with pit on anterior surface of ascending process; astragalar anterolateral process larger than posterolateral process in dorsal view; straight astragalar ventral margin in anterior view; subtriangular astragalar medial condyle in anterior view.
Comments- The material was probably discovered between 2006 and 2009 and was initally announced by Novas et al. (2009) as a taxon "closely related with plateosaurians". Novas et al. (2011) found Nambalia to be more derived than Thecodontosaurus and Pantydraco but outside the Efraasia+Plateosauria clade when added to a version of Yates' sauropodomorph matrix.
References- Novas, Chatterjee, Ezcurra and Kutty, 2009. New dinosaur remains from the Late Triassic of central India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 156A.
Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011. New dinosaur species from the Upper Triassic Upper Maleri and Lower Dharmaram Formations of central India. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 101, 333-349.

Lamplughsaura

Efraasia

Xixiposaurus

Plateosauria Tornier, 1913
Definition
- (Plateosaurus engelhardti + Massospondylus carinatus) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
Other definitions- (Plateosaurus engelhardti + Jingshanosaurus xinwaensis) (modified from Galton and Upchurch, 2004)
(Plateosaurus engelhardti, Massospondylus carinatus <- Saltasaurus loricatus) (Sereno, 2007)
Comments- Tornier (1913) originally used Plateosauria as an alternative name for Theropoda, which also contained basal sauropodomorphs at the time.
References- Tornier, 1913. Reptilia (Paläontologie). Handwörterbuch Naturwissenschaften. 8, 337-376.
Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 210, 41-83.
Galton and Upchurch, 2004. Prosauropoda. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (second edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 232-258.
Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.

Euskelosaurus

Prosauropoda Huene, 1920
Definition- (Plateosaurus engelhardti <- Saltasaurus loricatus) (Wilson, 2005; modified from Sereno, 1998)
Other definitions- (Thecodontosaurus antiquus, Plateosaurus engelhardti, Melanorosaurus readi <- Diplodocus longus) (modified from Upchurch, 1997)
(Plateosaurus engelhardti, Riojasaurus incertus, Massospondylus carinatus, Lufengosaurus huenei, Yunnanosaurus huangi <- Saltasaurus loricatus) (Sereno, 2007)
References- Huene, 1920. Bemerkungen zur Systematik und Stammesgeschichte einiger Reptilien [Remarks on the systematics and phylogeny of some reptiles]. Zeitschrift für Induktive Abstammungs und Vererbungslehre. 22, 209-212.
Upchurch, 1997. Sauropodomorpha. In Currie and Padian (eds.). Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs. Academic Press, San Diego. 658-660.
Wilson, 2005. Overview of sauropod phylogeny and evolution. in Curry Rogers and Wilson (eds.). The Sauropods: Evolution and Paleobiology. University of California Press, Berkeley. 15-49.
Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.

Plateosauridae Marsh, 1895
Definition- (Plateosaurus engelhardti <- Massospondylus carinatus) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
Other definitions- (Plateosaurus engelhardti <- Massospondylus carinatus, Yunnanosaurus huangi) (modified from Galton and Upchurch, 2004)
(Plateosaurus engelhardti <- Massospondylus carinatus, Saltasaurus loricatus) (Sereno, 2007)
(Plateosaurus engelhardti <- Diplodocus longus) (modified from Yates, 2007)
= Sellosauridae Huene, 1908
= Plateosauravidae Huene, 1929
References- Marsh, 1895. On the affinities and classification of the dinosaurian reptiles. American Journal of Science. 50, 483-498.
Huene, 1908. Die Dinosaurier der europäischen Triasformation mit Berücksichtiging der aussereuropäischen Vorkommnisse [The dinosaurs of the European Triassic Formation, with consideration of non-European occurrences]. Geologische und Paläontologische Abhandlungen Supplement-Band. 1, 419 pp.
Huene, 1929. Kurze Übersicht über die Saurischia und ihre natürlichen Zusammenhänge [A brief survey of the Saurischia and their natural context]. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 11, 269-273.
Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 210, 41-83.
Galton and Upchurch, 2004. Prosauropoda. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (second edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 232-258.
Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.
Yates, 2007. The first complete skull of the Triassic dinosaur Melanorosaurus Haughton (Sauropodomorpha: Anchisauria). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 9-55.

Plateosauravus

Ruehleia

Jaklapallisaurus Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011
J. asymmetrica Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011
Late Norian-Early Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Upper Maleri Formation, India
Holotype
- (ISI 274) fragmentary ?dorsal vertebra, proximal caudal vertebra, distal femur, tibia, astragalus, incomplete metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, incomplete metatarsal III, incomplete metatarsal IV
Late Norian-Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Lower Dharmaram Formation, India
Paratype
- (ISI R279) distal femur
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2011) distal femur with widely transversely open popliteal fossa in distal view; medial condyle of distal femur subtriangular in distal view; distal femur with straight anterior margin; distal tibia with concave posteromedial border; astragalar body with straight dorsal edge in posterior view; medial astragalar condyle strongly developed anteriorly, with medial end that is 1.6 times deeper than lateral one.
Comments- The material was probably discovered between 2006 and 2009 and was initally announced by Novas et al. (2009) as a taxon "closely related with plateosaurians". Novas et al. (2011) found Jaklapallisaurus to be in a polytomy with other plateosaurids when added to a version of Yates' sauropodomorph matrix.
References- Novas, Chatterjee, Ezcurra and Kutty, 2009. New dinosaur remains from the Late Triassic of central India. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 156A.
Novas, Ezcurra, Chatterjee and Kutty, 2011. New dinosaur species from the Upper Triassic Upper Maleri and Lower Dharmaram Formations of central India. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 101, 333-349.

Unaysaurus

Sellosaurus

Gresslyosaurus Rutimeyer, 1856b
= "Dinosaurus" Rutimeyer, 1856a (preoccupied Fischer, 1847)
G. ingens Rutimeyer, 1856b
= "Dinosaurus gresslyi" Rutimeyer, 1856a
= Plateosaurus ingens (Rutimeyer, 1856b) Galton, 1998
= Plateosaurus gresslyi (Rutimeyer, 1856b) Olshevsky, 2000
= Gresslyosaurus gresslyi (Rutimeyer, 1856b) Olshevsky, 2000
Late Norian, Late Triassic
Upper Zanclodon Knollenmergel, Switzerland
Syntypes
- (NMB NB10; lost) ilial fragment
(NMB NB24; lost) cervical central fragment
(NMB NB53; only cast remains) pedal ungual IV
(NMB NB530; lost) distal caudal vertebra
(NMB NB531; lost) chevron fragment
(NMB NB1521; lost) distal caudal vertebra
(NMB NB1572) caudal vertebra
(NMB NB1573) caudal vertebra
(NMB NB1574) caudal vertebra
(NMB NB1576) distal metatarsal V
(NMB NB1577) caudal vertebra
(NMB NB1578) metacarpal II
(NMB NB1582) proximal tibia
(NMB NB1584-1585) incomplete sacrum
(NMB NB1591) pedal phalanx
(NMB coll.; lost) distal tibia, proximal fibula (Huene, 1908)
Comments- Dinosaurus murchisoni (Fischer, 1845) Fischer, 1847 is a junior synonym of the anteosaurid synapsid Brithopus priscus. "Dinosaurus gresslyi" was named without a description by Rutimeyer (1856a), so was a nomen nudum. It needed to be renamed due to Fischer's genus anyway, so was officially described as Gresslyosaurus ingens by Rutimeyer later that year (1856b). As "Dinosaurus gresslyi" was invalid, Olshevsky's (2000) claim the species name should still be gresslyi is incorrect. Gresslyosaurus was often placed in Theropoda as related to supposed basal carnosaurs such as teratosaurids or zanclodontids (both based on crurotarsan cranial elements mixed with sauropodomorph postcrania). The species is now recognized as a plateosaurid and is often placed in Plateosaurus itself, though this is a matter of personal preference.
Type material no longer assigned to the syntype individual includes- (NMB NB1; lost) proximal tibia; (NMB NB25; lost) anterior dorsal vertebra; (NMB NB618; lost) coracoid; (NMB NB652; lost) tooth. These are from a smaller plateosaurid.
References- Fischer, 1845. Beitrag zur naeheren Bestimmung des von Hrn. Wangenheim von Qualen abgebildeten und beschriebenen Saurier-Schaedels. Bulletin de la Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou. 18, 540-543.
Fischer, 1847. Bemerkungen uber das Schadel-Fragment, welches Herr Major Wangenheim von Qualen in dem West-Ural entdeckt und der Gesellschaft zur Beurteilung vorgelegt hat. Bulletin de la Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou. 20, 263-267.
Rutimeyer, 1856a. Dinosaurus gresslyi. Bibliotheque Universelle des Sciences Belles-Lettres et Arts, Geneve. September, 53.
Rutimeyer, 1856b. Reptilienknochen aus dem Keuper. Allgemeine Schweizerische Gesellschaft fur de Gesammten Naturwissenschaften. 41, 62-64.
Galton, 1998. The prosauropod dinosaur Plateosaurus (Dimodosaurus) poligniensis (PIDANCET & CHOPARD, 1862) (Upper Triassic, Poligny, France). N. Jb. Geol. Palaont. Abh. 207, 255-288.
Olshevsky, 2000. An annotated checklist of dinosaur species by continent. Mesozoic Meanderings. 3, 1-157.
Moser, 2003. Plateosaurus engelhardti Meyer, 1837 (Dinosauria: Sauropodomorpha) aus dem Feuerletten (Mittelkeuper; Obertrias) von Bayern. Zitteliana B. 24, 3-186.

Plateosaurinae Marsh, 1895 vide Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991
Plateosaurini Marsh, 1895 vide Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991
References- Marsh, 1895. On the affinities and classification of the dinosaurian reptiles. American Journal of Science. 50, 483-498.
Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991. Late Triassic zoogeography and reconstruction of the terrestrial tetrapod fauna of North Africa. Paleontological Journal. 1, 1-12.
Plateosaurus

Massopoda Yates, 2007
Definition- (Saltasaurus loricatus <- Plateosaurus engelhardti) (after Yates, 2007)
References- Yates, 2007. Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: the identity of Aliwalia rex Galton. Historical Biology. 19(1), 93-123.

Massopoda indet. (Owen, 1861)
Hettangian-Early Sinemurian, Early Jurassic
Blue Lias Formation, England

Material- (GSM 109561) ungual (74.5 mm)
Comments- Owen (1861) referred the ungual GSM 109561 to Scelidosaurus, illustrated and described it. Newman (1968) stated it was "possibly the terminal phalange of the first digit of a megalosaurian", while Benson (2010) believed it to be an indeterminate theropod. Naish and Martill (2007) referred it to Tetanurae without comment. Pickering (1995) referred it to "Merosaurus newmani" without justification. However, compared to basal theropod pedal unguals, GSM 109561 is much straighter, stouter, broader and lacks the dorsal overhang on its proximal surface. A closer resemblence is seen to pedal unguals of basal massopods like Blikanasaurus and Jingshanosaurus. It is here provisionally referred to that clade.
References- Owen, 1861. Monograph of the fossil Reptilia of the Liassic formations. Part I. A monograph of the fossil dinosaur (Scelidosaurus harrisonii Owen) of the Lower Lias. Palaeontolographical Society Monographs. 13, 1-14.
Newman, 1968. The Jurassic dinosaur Scelidosaurus harrisoni Owen. Palaeontology. 11, 40-43.
Pickering, 1995b. An extract from: Archosauromorpha: Cladistics and osteologies. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project. 11 pp.
Naish and Martill, 2007. Dinosaurs of Great Britain and the role of the Geological Society of London in their discovery: Basal Dinosauria and Saurischia. Journal of the Geological Society. 164, 493-510.
Benson, 2010. The osteology of Magnosaurus nethercombensis (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) of the United Kingdom and a re-examination of the oldest records of tetanurans. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(1), 131-146.

Riojasauridae Yates, 2007
Definition- (Riojasaurus incertus <- Plateosaurus engelhardti, Massospondylus carinatus, Anchisaurus polyzelus)
References- Yates, 2007. Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: the identity of Aliwalia rex Galton. Historical Biology. 19(1), 93-123.

Riojasaurus

Eucnemesaurus van Hoepen, 1920
= Aliwalia Galton, 1985
Diagnosis- (after Yates, 2007) abrupt proximal end of the anterior trochanter; fourth trochanter with curved and oblique long axis.
References- van Hoepen, 1920. Contributions to the knowledge of the reptiles of the Karroo Formation. 6. Further dinosaurian material in the Transvaal Museum. Annals of the Transvaal Museum. 7, 7-140.
Galton, 1985. The poposaurid thecodontian Teratosaurus suevicus v. Meyer, plus referred specimens mostly based on prosauropod dinosaurs, from the Middle Stubensandstein (Upper Triassic) of Nordwurttemberg. Stuttgarter Beitrage zur Naturkunde (B). 116, 1-29.
Yates, 2007. Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: The identity of Aliwalia rex Galton. Historical Biology. 19(1), 93-123.
E. fortis van Hoepen, 1920
= Aliwalia rex Galton, 1985
Middle Norian-Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Lower Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (TM 119) two incomplete dorsal neural arches, dorsal centrum, four incomplete proximal to mid caudal vertebrae, distal and proximal pubic fragments, proximal femur, tibia
Referred- (BP/1/6107) posterior dorsal vertebra (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6110) distal femur (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6111) proximal femur (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6112) two rib fragments (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6113) coracoid (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6114) proximal scapular fragment (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6115) distal scapular fragment (Yates, 2007)
....(BP/1/6120) proximal caudal vertebra (Yates, 2007)
?...(BP/1/6151) fragmentary mid caudal vertebrae, fragmentary distal caudal vertebrae, two phalangeal fragments (Yates, 2007)
(NMW 1876-VII-B124; holotype of Aliwalia rex) (~9 m) distal femur (Huene, 1906)
....(NMW 1886-XV-39) proximal femur (Huene, 1906)
Diagnosis- (after Yates, 2007) small accessory lamina branching off of the paradiapophyseal lamina and dividing the middle chonos in the middle dorsal vertebrae (unknown in E. entaxonis).
(after McPhee et al., 2015) distal tibia in which the mediolaterally extensive posterior surface extends as far laterally as the anterior ascending process.
Comments- Aliwalia rex was described as a herrerasaurian by Galton (1985) based on a partial femur found in the 1860s and originally referred to Euskelosaurus by Huene (1906), and referred snout fragment (BMNH R3301) also originally described as Euskelosaurus (Seeley, 1894). Usually referred to Herrerasauridae or Dinosauria incertae sedis and described in more depth by Galton and Van Heerden (1998), Aliwalia was recognized by Yates (2007) to be a junior synonym of the sauropodomorph Eucnemesaurus fortis. The snout fragment is not sauropodomorph and is here left as Archosauria incertae sedis. Eucnemesaurus itself was first described as a theropod by Van Hoepen (1920), as he placed all basal sauropodomorphs in that clade. More recently, Eucnemesaurus has been recognized as a riojasaurid by Yates (2007), who also described a new specimen. Blackbeard (2009) noted a new more complete specimen in an abstract, but this was described as the new species Eucnemesaurus entaxonis by McPhee et al. (2015).
References- Seeley, 1894. On Euskelosaurus brownii (Huxley). Annals and Magazine of Natural History. 14, 317-340.
Huene, 1906. Ueber die Dinosaurier der aussereuropaischen Trias. Geologische und Palaontologische Abhandlungen. 8, 99-156.
van Hoepen, 1920. Contributions to the knowledge of the reptiles of the Karroo Formation. 6. Further dinosaurian material in the Transvaal Museum. Annals of the Transvaal Museum. 7, 7-140.
van Heerden, 1979. The morphology and taxonomy of Euskelosaurus (Reptilia: Saurischia; Late Triassic) from South Africa. Navorsinge van die Nasionale Museum. 4, 21-84.
Galton, 1985. The poposaurid thecodontian Teratosaurus suevicus v. Meyer, plus referred specimens mostly based on prosauropod dinosaurs, from the Middle Stubensandstein (Upper Triassic) of Nordwurttemberg. Stuttgarter Beitrage zur Naturkunde (B). 116, 1-29.
Galton and Van Heerden, 1998. Anatomy of the prosauropod dinosaur Blikanasaurus cromptoni (Upper Triassic, South Africa), with notes on other tetrapods from the lower Elliot Formation. Palaontologische Zeitschrift. 72, 163-177.
Yates, 2007. Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: The identity of Aliwalia rex Galton. Historical Biology. 19(1), 93-123.
Blackbeard, 2009. A re-examination of the taxonomy of the rare Triassic dinosaur, Eucnemesaurus based on an articulated skeleton from the Eastern Cape of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 65A.
McPhee, Choiniere, Yates and Viglietti, 2015. A second species of Eucnemesaurus Van Hoepen, 1920 (Dinosauria, Sauropodomorpha): New information on the diversity and evolution of the sauropodomorph fauna of South Africa's lower Elliot Formation (Latest Triassic). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 35(5), e980504. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2015.980504
E. entaxonis McPhee, Choiniere, Yates and Viglietti, 2015
Middle Norian-Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Lower Elliot Formation, South Africa

Holotype- (BP/1/6234) thirteenth dorsal vertebra (~91 mm), fourteenth dorsal vertebra, posterior dorsal ribs, partial first sacral vertebra, second sacral vertebra, third sacral vertebra, first caudal vertebra (~75 mm), second caudal vertebra, third caudal vertebra, fourth caudal vertebra, fifth caudal vertebra, mid caudal vertebra, few proximal chevrons, ilia (one fragmentary), partial pubes, ischia (one incomplete, one fragmentary; ~400 mm), femora (one incomplete, one fragmentary; 535 mm), partial tibia, distal fibula, incomplete astragalus, calcaneum, metatarsal I (92 mm), phalanges I-1, pedal unguals I (one partial), metatarsal II (149 mm), phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, partial pedal ungual II, metatarsal III (~170 mm), phalanx III-1, metatarsal IV, metatarsal V (74 mm)
Diagnosis- (after McPhee et al., 2015) small, circular pit excavates sacral rib of first primordial sacral at midheight (also present in Melanorosaurus); sharp ventral keel on proximal caudal centra; deep brevis fossa with relatively thin lateral and medial walls (also deep in Riojasaurus).
Comments- This was initially announced in an abstract by Blackbeard (2009) as a new specimen of Eucnemesaurus fortis, but was fully described by McPhee et al. (2015) as the new species E. entaxonis.
References- Blackbeard, 2009. A re-examination of the taxonomy of the rare Triassic dinosaur, Eucnemesaurus based on an articulated skeleton from the Eastern Cape of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 65A.
McPhee, Choiniere, Yates and Viglietti, 2015. A second species of Eucnemesaurus Van Hoepen, 1920 (Dinosauria, Sauropodomorpha): New information on the diversity and evolution of the sauropodomorph fauna of South Africa's lower Elliot Formation (Latest Triassic). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 35(5), e980504. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2015.980504

Sarahsaurus

Gryponychidae Huene, 1932
Comments- This family was erected by Huene (1932) to contain Gryponyx and Aetonyx in Carnosauria.
Reference- Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre entwicklung und geschichte. Monographien zur Geologia und Palaeontologie. 1, 1-362.
Gryponyx Broom, 1911
G. africanus Broom, 1911
Pliensbachian, Early Jurassic
Upper Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (SAM 3357-59) (~5 m) two posterior dorsal vertebrae (75 mm), incomplete radius (210 mm), incomplete ulna (~220 mm), distal carpal I, distal carpal II, distal carpal III, distal carpal IV, metacarpal I (64 mm), phalanx I-1 (63 mm), manual ungual I (110 mm), metacarpal II (80 mm), phalanx II-1 (42 mm), phalanx II-2 (35 mm), manual ungual II (55 mm), metacarpal III (75 mm), phalanx III-1 (32 mm), phalanx III-2 (25 mm), phalanx III-3 (24 mm), manual ungual III (35 mm), metacarpal IV (50 mm), phalanx IV-1 (25 mm), phalanx IV-2 (19 mm), partial phalanx IV-3, metacarpal V (38 mm), phalanx V-1 (26 mm), phalanx V-2, partial ilium, pubes (440 mm), ischium (405 mm), femur (540 mm), tibia (450 mm), fibula (413 mm), astragalus, metatarsal I (112 mm), phalanx I-1 (71 mm), pedal ungual I (110 mm), metatarsal II (187 mm), phalanx II-1 (72 mm), phalanx II-2 (53 mm), pedal ungual II (99 mm), metatarsal III (203 mm), phalanx III-1 (71 mm), phalanx III-2 (52 mm), phalanx III-3 (45 mm), pedal ungual III (77 mm), metatarsal IV (166 mm), phalanx IV-1 (57 mm), phalanx IV-2 (44 mm), phalanx IV-3 (38 mm), phalanx IV-4 (34 mm), pedal ungual IV (68 mm), metatarsal V (113 mm)
Comments- Originally described as a theropod by Broom (1911), Gryponyx africanus was usually viewed as a basal carnosaur until Galton and Cluver (1976) and Cooper (1981) synonymized it with Massospondylus. It has been generally ignored since, until Vasconcelos and Yates (2004) revalidated it based on differences including- total length of metacarpal I exceeds maximum proximal width; long, narrow pubic apron with straight lateral margins. They entered it into Yates sauropodomorph matrix and found it to be the most basal massospondylid. While Yates' codings for Gryponyx were published in Yates et al. (2010), the taxon has yet to be redescribed.
References- Broom, 1911. On the dinosaurs of the Stormberg, South Africa. Annals of the South African Museum. 7(4), 291-308.
Van Hoepen, 1920. Contributions to the knowledge of the reptiles of the Karroo Formation. 6. Further dinosaurian material in the Transvaal Museum. Ann Transvaal Mus. 7, 7-140.
Haughton, 1924. The fauna and stratigraphy of the Stormberg Series. Annals of the South African Museum. 12, 323-497.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre entwicklung und geschichte. Monographien zur Geologia und Palaeontologie. 1, 1-362.
Galton and Cluver, 1976. Anchisaurus capensis (Broom) and a revision of the Anchisauridae (Reptilia, Saurischia). Annals of the South African Museum. 69(6), 121-159.
Cooper, 1981. The prosauropod dinosaur Massospondylus carinatus Owen from Zimbabwe: Its biology, mode of life and phylogenetic significance. Occasional Papers of the National Museums and Monuments of Rhodesia (series B, Natural Sciences). 6, 689-840.
Vasconcelos and Yates, 2004. Sauropodomorph biodiversity of the upper Elliot Formation (Lower Jurassic) of Southern Africa. Geoscience Africa 2004, Abstract volume, 670.
Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2010. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 277(1682), 787-794.

"Gyposaurus" sinensis

Massospondylidae Huene, 1914
Definition- (Massospondylus carinatus <- Plateosaurus engelhardti, Saltasaurus loricatus) (Sereno, online)
Other definitions- (Massospondylus carinatus <- Plateosaurus engelhardti) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
?= Mussauridae Bonaparte and Vince, 1979
References- Huene, 1914. Das natürliche System der Saurischia [The systematics of the Saurischia]. Centralblatt für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paläontologie. 1914, 154-158.
Bonaparte and Vince, 1979. El hallazgo del primer nido de dinosaurios triasicos, (Saurischia, Prosauropoda), Triasico Superior de Patagonia, Argentina [The discovery of the first nest of Triassic dinosaurs (Saurischia, Prosauropoda,) from the Upper Triassic of Patagonia, Argentina]. Ameghiniana. 16(1-2), 173-182.
Sereno, 1998. A rationale for phylogenetic definitions, with application to the higher-level taxonomy of Dinosauria. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Abhandlungen. 210, 41-83.
Sereno, online. Stem Archosauria - TaxonSearch. URL http://www.taxonsearch.org/dev/file_home.php [version 1.0, 2005 November 7]

Pradhania

Massospondylus Owen, 1854
= Ignavusaurus Knoll, 2010
M. carinatus Owen, 1854
= I. rachelis Knoll, 2010
Pliensbachian, Early Jurassic
Upper Elliot Formation, Lesotho
Referred
- (BM HR 20; holotype of Ignavusaurus rachelis) (~1.5 m. ~23 kg, <1 year old juvenile) postorbital, quadrate, skull fragments, about thirty complete to fragmentary teeth, partial second dorsal centrum, third to fourteenth dorsal vertebrae (d3 29.5, d14 22.7 mm), gastralia, first to third sacral vertebrae (26.6, 20.1, 24.3 mm), first to fifteenth caudal vertebrae (c1 19.7, c14 20.1 mm), distal scapula, distal humerus, radius (60.3 mm), ulna (66.2 mm), metacarpal III (22.4 mm), phalanx III-1 (9.6 mm), phalanx III-2 (8.1 mm), phalanx III-3 (7.7 mm), manual ungual III (10.4 mm), metacarpal IV (17.7 mm), phalanx IV-1 (6.8 mm), phalanx IV-2 (4.1 mm), phalanx IV-3 (3.6 mm), metacarpal V (10.8 mm), phalanx V-1 (6.9 mm), incomplete ilia (95.3 mm), pubes (one incomplete, one fragmentary (121.9 mm), ischia (one incomplete; 105.7 mm), incomplete femora (152.7 mm), incomplete tibia, astragalus, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, proximal metatarsal II, phalanx II-2 (12.7 mm), pedal ungual II, proximal metatarsal III, phalanx III-1 fragment, phalanx III-2 (14.6 mm), phalanx III-3 (12 mm), pedal ungual III, proximal metatarsal IV, proximal phalanx IV-1, metatarsal V (28.5 mm), phalanx V-1 (6.4 mm) (Knoll, 2002; described by Knoll, 2010)
Diagnosis- (after Knoll, 2010) Combination of- transverse width of ventral postorbital process greater than anteroposterior width at midlength; height of orbital rim of postorbital raised so that it projects laterally to posterior process; first dentary tooth adjacent to symphysis; teeth linearly placed within jaws; dentary tooth crowns slightly procumbent; mesial and distal serrations restricted to apical half of tooth crown; fourteen vertebrae between cervicodorsal transition and primordial sacral vertebrae; dorsal transverse processes dorsally directed; posterior margin of mid dorsal neural spines concave in lateral view with projecting posterodorsal corner; first caudal centrum shorter than high; metacarpal V about as wide as long; metacarpal V with strongly convex proximal articulation; posterior margin of postacetabular process bluntly pointed; lateral margin of pubic apron concave in dorsal view; no longitudinal dorsolateral sulcus on proximal ischium; roughly hemispherical femoral head with no sharp medial distal corner; subrectangular astragalus in proximal view; pyramidal process on anterolateral corner of astragalus; transverse width of proximal end of metatarsal V 50% length of element.
Comments- [This entry is partial, only including information on Ignavusaurus at the moment]
The holotype was first mentioned in Knoll's (2002) thesis, which illustrated the ilium. Knoll (2010) recovered it in a version of Yates' sauropodomorph matrix as a basal form more derived than Thecodontosaurus and Pantydraco, but less than Efraasia and plateosaurians. However, Yates et al. (2011) noted that of the proposed basal characters, elongate proximal chevrons and an unexpanded distal tibia are seen in the contemporaneous Massospondylus, and that the absent entocondylar facet and small size are juvenile characters. They also stated some characters of Ignavusaurus ("weakly developed basal constrictions of the teeth, coarse apically restricted denticulations of the teeth, and a relatively narrow pubic apron with a concave lateral margin") are shared with Massospondylus, so proposed Ignavusaurus' holotype is merely a juvenile specimen of that common genus. This is supported by Apaldetti et al.'s (2011) version of Yates' matrix which recovered Ignavusaurus as a massopod sister to Sarahsaurus. It can be placed in Massospondylidae with six extra steps.
References- Owen, 1854. Descriptive catalogue of the fossil organic remains of Reptilia and Pisces contained in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. London. 184 pp.
Knoll, 2002. Les Fabrosauridae Galton, 1972 (Dinosauria: Ornithischia): Répartition géographique et stratigraphique; systématique et phylogénie. PhD thesis. Museum national d'Histoire Naturelle. 242 pp.
Knoll, 2010. A primitive sauropodomorph from the upper Elliot Formation of Lesotho. Geological Magazine. 147(6), 814-829.
Apaldetti, Martinez, Alcober and Pol, 2011. A new basal sauropodomorph (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from Quebrada del Barro Formation (Marayes-El Carrizal Basin), northwestern Argentina. PLoS ONE. 6(11), e26964.
Yates, Bonnan and Neveling, 2011. A new basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 31(3), 610-625.

Adeopapposaurus

Leyesaurus Apaldetti, Martinez, Alcober and Pol, 2011
L. marayensis Apaldetti, Martinez, Alcober and Pol, 2011
Early Jurassic?
Quebrada del Barro Formation, San Juan, Argentina
Holotype
- (PVSJ 706) (~2.5 m) incomplete skull (147.4 mm), mandibles (one partial), hyoids, partial proatlas, odontoid (13.3 mm), atlantal intercentrum (11.7 mm), atlantal neural arches (one partial), incomplete axis (~65.4 mm), third cervical vertebra (~79 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (85.1 mm), incomplete fifth cervical vertebra (~97 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (97.3 mm), incomplete seventh cervical vertebra, cervical ribs, partial proximal caudal vertebra, incomplete mid caudal vertebra (46.4 mm), two mid chevrons, proximal scapular fragment, partial coracoid, proximal humeral fragment, partial pubis, proximal ischia, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, phalanx I-1 (48.5 mm), phalanx II-2 (36.2 mm), incomplete metatarsal III, metatarsal IV (119 mm), phalanx IV-2, metatarsal V (65.2 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Apaldetti et al., 2011) sharply acute angle (50 degrees) formed by maxillary ascending process and alveolar margin; straight maxillary ascending process with longitudinal ridge on lateral surface; noticeably bulging labial side of maxillary teeth; greatly elongated cervical vertebra (length/height ratio of sixth cervical centrum >5); cervical neural arches with sinuous dorsal neural spine margin; short cervical epipophyses (extend two-thirds length of postzygapophyses); proximal articular surface of metatarsal III shelf-like and medially deflected.
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 2001. Apaldetti et al. (2011) added Leyesaurus to Yates' sauropodomorph analysis and found it to be a massospondylid sister to Adeopapposaurus.
Reference- Apaldetti, Martinez, Alcober and Pol, 2011. A new basal sauropodomorph (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from Quebrada del Barro Formation (Marayes-El Carrizal Basin), northwestern Argentina. PLoS ONE. 6(11), e26964.

Seitaad

Coloradisaurus

Lufengosaurus
L. huangi

L? "changduensis" Zhao, 1985
Etymology- Changdu is an alternative spelling of Qamdo, the county it was discovered in.
Early Jurassic
Middle Daye Group, Qamdo County, Daye, Tibet, China
Comments
- This species is apparently illustrated by Yang (1986). Weishampel et al. (2004) include it in their faunal list along with an undescribed prosauropod which may be the same thing. As it has not been described in the published literature, Lufengosaurus? "changduensis" is a nomen nudum.
Relationships- Listed as a plateosaurid by Chure and McIntosh (1989) and Fang et al. (2006), and as an undescribed anchisaurid by Weishampel (1990). Lufengosaurus has more recently been placed as a basal massopod, but being undescribed, there is no published evidence "changduensis" belongs in Lufengosaurus or is distinct from L. huenei.
References- Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Yang, 1986. The Jurassic System. in Yang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Geology of China. Clarendon Press. 140-152.
Chure and McIntosh, 1989. A Bibliography of the Dinosauria (Exclusive of the Aves) 1677-1986. Museum of Western Colorado Paleontology Series #1. 226 pp.
Weishampel, 1990. Dinosaurian distribution. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press. 63-139.
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria: Second Edition. University of California Press. 517-606.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

Glacialisaurus

Chuxiongosaurus Lu, Kobayashi, Li and Zhong, 2010
C. lufengensis Lu, Kobayashi, Li and Zhong, 2010
Hettangian, Early Jurassic
Shawan Member (Dull Purplish Beds) of Lufeng Formation, Yunnan, China
Holotype
- (LT9401) (~2 m subadult) skull (340 mm), sclerotic ossicles, mandibles (335 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Lu et al., 2010) lacrimal perpendicular to ventral skull margin (also in Pantydraco); depression on dorsal snout posterior to naris; anterior profile of maxilla slopes continuously toward tip; twenty-fiev dentary teeth.
Comments- Included in a version of Yates' sauropodomorph matrix (Lu et al., 2010), Chuxiongosaurus emerges as a non-anchisaurian massopod.
Reference- Lu, Kobayashi, Li and Zhong, 2010. A new basal sauropod dinosaur from the Lufeng Basin, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. Acta Geologica Sinica. 84(6), 1336-1342.

Jingshanosaurus

Yunnanosauridae Young, 1942
Reference- Young, 1942. Yunnanosaurus huangi Young (gen. et sp. nov.), a new Prosauropoda from the Red Beds at Lufeng, Yunnan. Bulletin of the Geological Society of China. 22(1-2), 63-104.
Yunnanosaurus

Anchisauria Haeckel, 1895
Definition
- (Anchisaurus polyzelus + Melanorosaurus readi) (modified from Galton and Upchurch, 2004)
References-
Haeckel, 1895. Systematische Phylogenie der Wirbelthiere: (Vertebrata). 660 pp.
Galton and Upchurch, 2004. Prosauropoda. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (second edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 232-258.

Anchisauridae Marsh, 1885
= Amphisauridae Marsh, 1882
= Ammosauridae Huene, 1914
= Anchisaurinae Marsh, 1885 vide Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991
Diagnosis- (Anchisaurus polyzelus <- Melanorosaurus readi) (modified from Galton and Upchurch, 2004)
References- Marsh, 1882. Classification of the Dinosauria. American Journal of Science. 23, 81-86.
Marsh, 1885. Names of extinct reptiles. American Journal of Science. 29, 169.
Huene, 1914. Das natürliche System der Saurischia [The systematics of the Saurischia]. Centralblatt für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paläontologie. 1914, 154-158.
Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991. Late Triassic zoogeography and reconstruction of the terrestrial tetrapod fauna of North Africa. Paleontological Journal. 1, 1-12.

Anchisaurus

Sauropodiformes Sereno, 2007
Definition- (Mussaurus patagonicus + Saltasaurus loricatus) (Sereno, 2007)
References- Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.

Mussaurus

Sauropoda sensu Sereno, 2007
Definition- (Saltasaurus loricatus <- Jingshanosaurus xinwaensis, Mussaurus patagonicus)
Reference- Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.

Aardonyx Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2010
= "Aardonyx" Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2009 online
A. celestae Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2010
= "Aardonyx celestae" Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2009 online
Pliensbachian, Early Jurassic
Upper Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (BP/1/6254) (two 7 year old subadult individuals, one ~85% the size of the other) partial maxilla (~193 mm)
Paratypes- ..(BP/1/5379a-f; larger individual) basioccipital, radius (283 mm), ulna (305 mm), metacarpal I (65 m), distal tibia, second sacral rib
..(BP/1/6238) posterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6239) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6240) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6241) first sacral centrum
..(BP/1/6242) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6243) dorsal rib fragments
..(BP/1/6244; larger individual?) chevron (276 mm)
..(BP/1/6245) anterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6248) dorsal ribs
..(BP/1/6249) anterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6250) pedal ungual III (73 mm)
..(BP/1/6252) dorsal ribs
..(BP/1/6253; larger individual) metatarsal II (168 mm)
..(BP/1/6254) maxilla
..(BP/1/6255) prootic
..(BP/1/6259) anterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6260) dorsal ribs
..(BP/1/6261) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6262) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6263; larger individual?) ~sixth dorsal rib (853 mm)
..(BP/1/6264) anterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6265) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6266) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6267) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6270) fourteenth dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6273) posterior dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6274) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6275) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6276) dorsal ribs
..(BP/1/6277) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6278) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6287) dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6288-6289) dorsal rib shaft
..(BP/1/6290) ischium
..(BP/1/6291) chevron
..(BP/1/6292) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6293) cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6294) caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/6295; larger individual?) mid-distal caudal vertebra (79 mm), caudal vertebra(e)
..(BP/1/6296) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6297) chevron
..(BP/1/6298) rib fragment
..(BP/1/6299) rib fragment
..(BP/1/6300) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6301) rib fragment
..(BP/1/6302) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6303) caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/6304) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6305) premaxillary tooth
..(BP/1/6306) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6307) caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/6308; smaller individual) metacarpal I (58 mm)
..(BP/1/6309) third sacral vertebra
..(BP/1/6310) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6311) frontal
..(BP/1/6312) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6313) first sacral rib
..(BP/1/6314) phalanx
..(BP/1/6315) distal tarsal IV
..(BP/1/6316) fibula
..(BP/1/6317) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6319) pedal phalanx
..(BP/1/6320) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6321; smaller individual) radius (234 mm)
..(BP/1/6323; smaller individual?) ~fourth dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6327) dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6325) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6326) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6327) surangular
..(BP/1/6328) chevron
..(BP/1/6329) tooth
..(BP/1/6330) left jugal
..(BP/1/6332) cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6333) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6334) dentary
..(BP/1/6335) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6336) pedal phalanx
..(BP/1/6339) chevron
..(BP/1/6341) anterior cervical rib
..(BP/1/6342) palatine
..(BP/1/6505) posterior maxilla
..(BP/1/6506) gastralium
..(BP/1/6507) postorbital
..(BP/1/6509; larger individual) metatarsal III (198 mm)
..(BP/1/6510; smaller individual) femur (681 mm)
..(BP/1/6511) surangular
..(BP/1/6512; larger individual) pedal phalanx III-1 (63 m)
..(BP/1/6513; larger individual?) ?third cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6540) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1 6541; larger individual?) proximal-mid caudal vertebra (74 mm)
..(BP/1/6542; smaller individual) metatarsal III (177 mm)
..(BP/1/6563) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6564) chevron
..(BP/1/6565) posterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6566; larger individual?) ~thirteenth dorsal vertebra (101 mm)
..(BP/1/6584) premaxilla
..(BP/1/6585; smaller individual) pubis (535 mm)
..(BP/1/6586) caudal neural spine
..(BP/1/6588) distal tarsal III
..(BP/1/6589) pedal ungual
..(BP/1/6590) ischium
..(BP/1/6591; larger individual?) ~second dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6592) pedal ungual I (116 mm)
..(BP/1/6593) pedal ungual IV (64 mm)
..(BP/1/6594) anterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6595) pedal phalanx
..(BP/1/6596) squamosal
..(BP/1/6597) clavicle
..(BP/1/6600) prootic
..(BP/1/6601) metatarsal IV
..(BP/1/6602; smaller individual) metatarsal I (97 mm)
..(BP/1/6604) cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6605; larger individual?) atlantal neurapophysis
..(BP/1/6607; smaller individual) metatarsal II (70 mm)
..(BP/1/6608) manual ungual ?IV
..(BP/1/6611) manual phalanx I-1
..(BP/1/6613; larger individual?) ~second dorsal centrum (90 mm)
..(BP/1/6615; larger individual?) ?seventh cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6617) prefrontal (79 mm)
..(BP/1/6618) first sacral rib
..(BP/1/6619) metatarsal I
..(BP/1/6620; larger individual?) proximal-mid caudal vertebra (82 mm)
..(BP/1/6622) posterior dorsal prezygapophysis
..(BP/1/6623; larger individual) metatarsal IV (184 mm)
..(BP/1/6624) anterior cervical rib
..(BP/1/6625; larger individual?) distal caudal vertebra (67 mm)
..(BP/1/6626; smaller individual) metatarsal IV (163 mm)
..(BP/1/6627) distal chevron
..(BP/1/6631) mid-posterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6632) incomplete frontal
..(BP/1/6633) posterior cervical rib
..(BP/1/6634; larger individual?) proximal chevron (265 mm)
..(BP/1/6636) anterior-mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6637) gastralium
..(BP/1/6641; larger individual?) ~third caudal centrum (88 mm)
..(BP/1/6642; larger individual?) ~third dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6644; larger individual?) ~third cervical centrum (116 mm)
..(BP/1/6645) incomplete basisphenoid
..(BP/1/6647) manual phalanx I-1
..(BP/1/6648) mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6650) pedal phalanx III-1
..(BP/1/6651) first dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6652) lateral gastralium
..(BP/1/6653) posterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6654) premaxillary tooth
..(BP/1/6655) mid cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6657) lateral gastralium
..(BP/1/6658) anterior-mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6659) chevron
..(BP/1/6660) distal chevron
..(BP/1/6661) posterior dorsal neural arch fragment
..(BP/1/6662; larger individual?) ?fifth cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6663) posterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6664) posterior cervical rib
..(BP/1/6665) mid cervical rib
..(BP/1/6666; larger individual?) fourteenth dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6667) sacral centrum
..(BP/1/6668) proximal scapula
..(BP/1/6669; larger individual?) mid caudal vertebra (84 mm)
..(BP/1/6670) manual phalanx II-1
..(BP/1/6681; larger individual?) ~eighth cervical neural arch
..(BP/1/6722) anterior-mid dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6723) posterior dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6753) proximal caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/6754) proximal-mid caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/6755; larger individual?) ~second caudal vertebra (78 mm)
..(BP/1/6756) distal chevron
..(BP/1/6758) anterior dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6759) squamosal
..(BP/1/6760) anterior dorsal centrum
..(BP/1/6761) proximal chevron
..(BP/1/6762) distal metacarpal II
..(BP/1/6763) parietal)
..(BP/1/6764) prearticular
..(BP/1/6765) lateral gastralium
..(BP/1/6766) premaxilla
..(BP/1/6767) medial gastralium
..(BP/1/6773) pedal phalanx IV-1
..(BP/1/6893; larger individual) metatarsal I (116 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Yates et al., 2010) five premaxillary teeth (also in Plateosaurus); band of dense, fine pits and small foramina along lower half of lateral maxillary surface; reduced lateral maxillary neurovascular foramina anterior to large posteriorly facing foramen at posterior end of maxilla (middle foramina are <6% of maxillary depth posterior to antorbital fossa); elongate anterior ramus of maxilla combined with steep dorsal premaxillary process to produce an enlarged external naris (area at least subequal to orbit); well-developed longitudinal sulcus on medial side of posterior maxillary ramus; reduced cervical diapophyses that remain as low tubercles, with concomitant absence of diapophyseal laminae, along full length of cervical series; large, rugose biceps scar (maximum diameter 13% length of radius) on anteromedial surface of radial shaft; broad and flat proximal end of metatarsal IV (transverse width 2.9 times greater than extensor-flexor depth); distal end of metatarsal IV with strongly laterally flared posteroolateral corner.
Comments- The article describing this taxon was available online November 2009, but not physically published until March 2010, so the name was a nomen nudum until then. The material was discovered between 2004 and 2007 and first reported as two separate taxa (Sauropod A and Sauropod B) in an abstract (Yates et al., 2007). Yates et al. (2010) entered it in Yates' sauropodomorph matrix and recovered Aardonyx as an anchisaur sister to Melanorosaurus+Sauropoda. Its position has remained the same in subsequent versions, though Sefapanosaurus and Leonerasaurus have similar placement. The type of Sefapanosaurus was provisionally referred to Aardonyx by McPhee et al. (2014) before being described as a new genus.
References- Yates, Bonnan and Neveling, 2007. A new diverse dinosaur assemblage from the Early Jurassic of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(3), 169A.
Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2010. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 277(1682), 787-794.
McPhee, Yates, Choiniere and Abdala, 2014. The complete anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Antetonitrus ingenipes (Sauropodiformes, Dinosauria): Implications for the origins of Sauropoda. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 171, 151-205.

undescribed sauropodiform (Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2010)
Pliensbachian, Early Jurassic
Upper Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (BP/1/coll.) femur
Comments- Yates et al. (2010) noted this differs from Aardonyx in- strongly reduced flexure of shaft, oval cross section of shaft, medially shifted fourth trochanter, and laterally shifted anterior trochanter that is visible in posterior view.
Reference- Yates, Bonnan, Neveling, Chinsamy and Blackbeard, 2010. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 277(1682), 787-794.

Blikanasauridae Galton and Van Heerden, 1985
= Blikanasaurini Galton and Van Heerden vide Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991
References- Galton and Van Heerden, 1985. Partial hindlimb of Blikanasaurus cromptoni n. gen. and n. sp., representing a new family of prosauropod dinosaurs from the Upper Triassic of South Africa. Géobios. 18(4), 509-516.
Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991. Late Triassic zoogeography and reconstruction of the terrestrial tetrapod fauna of North Africa. Paleontological Journal. 1, 1-12.
Blikanasaurus

Camelotia

Sefapanosaurus Otero, Krupandan, Pol, Chinsamy and Choiniere, 2015
S. zastronensis Otero, Krupandan, Pol, Chinsamy and Choiniere, 2015
Norian-Sinemurian, Late Triassic-Early Jurassic
Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (BP/1/386) astragalus (132 mm trans), calcaneum, distal tarsal IV, proximal metacarpal III, proximal metatarsal IV, incomplete metatarsal V
Paratypes- (at least four individuals) ..(BP/1/7409) incomplete fifth or sixth cervical vertebra (140 mm)
..(BP/1/7410) sixth or seventh cervical centrum (134 mm)
..(BP/1/7411) cervical centrum (112 mm)
..(BP/1/7412) cervical centrum (105 mm)
..(BP/1/7413) partial ?cervical centrum (113 mm)
..(BP/1/7414) mid dorsal vertebra (79 mm)
..(BP/1/7415) incomplete ~fifth dorsal vertebra (97 mm)
..(BP/1/7416) incomplete tenth or eleventh dorsal vertebra (74 mm)
..(BP/1/7417) partial posterior dorsal vertebra (95 mm)
..(BP/1/7418) dorsal transverse process
..(BP/1/7419) posterior dorsal centrum (81 mm)
..(BP/1/7420) first sacral centrum (115 mm)
..(BP/1/7421) posterior dorsal centrum (82 mm)
..(BP/1/7422) incomplete ?third sacral centrum (57 mm)
..(BP/1/7423) partial posterior dorsal vertebra
..(BP/1/7424) partial first caudal vertebra (83 mm)
..(BP/1/7425) incomplete proximal caudal vertebra (87 mm)
..(BP/1/7426) mid caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/7427) proximal caudal vertebra (53 mm)
..(BP/1/7428) mid caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/7429) partial distal caudal vertebra (79 mm)
..(BP/1/7430) incomplete proximal chevron
..(BP/1/7431) dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/7432) incomplete coracoid (210 mm deep)
..(BP/1/7433) incomplete scapula
..(BP/1/7434) proximal humerus
..(BP/1/7435) radius (205 mm)
..(BP/1/7436) radius (207 mm)
..(BP/1/7437) incomplete ulna (220 mm)
..(BP/1/7438) distal carpal I, distal carpal II, metacarpal I (66 mm), phalanx I-1 (64 mm), metacarpal II (95 mm), metacarpal V (50 mm), phalanx V-1 (27 mm), phalanx V-2 (17 mm)
..(BP/1/7439) proximal ?pubis
..(BP/1/7440) proximal femur
..(BP/1/7441) proximal femur
..(BP/1/7442) proximal femur
..(BP/1/7443) proximal femur
..(BP/1/7444) distal femur
..(BP/1/7445) proximal tibia
..(BP/1/7446) distal fibula
..(BP/1/7447) fibula (450 mm)
..(BP/1/7448) proximal metatarsal II
..(BP/1/7449) distal metatarsal III
..(BP/1/7450) proximal ischium
Diagnosis- (after Otero et al., 2015) slit-shaped posterior dorsal neural canal (also in Antetonitrus and Lessemsaurus); length of proximal caudal neural spine base greater than half neural arch length (also in non-plateosaurian sauropodomorphs and Sellosaurus); cross-section of distal caudal centra square (also in Adeopapposaurus, Anchisaurus, Aardonyx, Melanorosaurus and Camelotia); long ridge extending from anterodorsal margin of coracoid to coracoid foramen; anteromedial process of ulna twice as long as anterolateral process and distally tapered; biceps tubercle on radius (also in Mussaurus, Aardonyx, Melanorosaurus and Antetonitrus); posterodistal tubercle on radius (also in Mussaurus, Aardonyx, Melanorosaurus and Antetonitrus); distal carpal I with proximally pointing tip on palmar surface, giving a triangular shape in palmar view; strongly concave medial margin of metacarpal I (also in Lufengosaurus, Aardonyx, Lessemsaurus and Antetonitrus); ventral margin of manual phalanx I-1 well developed with a proximally pointing tip (also in Mussaurus); metacarpal V longer than wide with flat proximal surface (also in Seitaad, Sellosaurus, Ruehleia, non-plateosaurians and sauropods); metacarpal I short and wide (proximal width more than length of bone) (also in Lufengosaurus, Jingshanosaurus, Seitaad, Aardonyx, Anteonitrus and Lessemsaurus); anteromedial projection on distal fibula; tall ascending process of the astragalus, 35% of mediolateral astragalar width; T-shaped, triradiate cross-section of astragalar ascending process; astragalar ascending process framed medially and posteriorly by well-developed, straight, thick ridges, which have subcircular cross-sections.
Comments- This material was recovered from 1936 to 1946 and initially identified as Euskelosaurus, than provisionally as Aardonyx (McPhee et al., 2014).
Using a version of Yates' sauropodomorph matrix, Otero et al. (2015) recovered Sefapanosaurus as a sauropodiform in a polytomy with Aardonyx, Leonerasaurus and Melanorosaurus+Sauropoda. Placing it outside Sauropodiformes took 2 more steps, outside Anchisauria 3 more steps, and at least as close to sauropods as Melanorosaurus 5 more steps.
References- McPhee, Yates, Choiniere and Abdala, 2014. The complete anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Antetonitrus ingenipes (Sauropodiformes, Dinosauria): Implications for the origins of Sauropoda. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 171, 151-205.
Otero, Krupandan, Pol, Chinsamy and Choiniere, 2015. A new basal sauropodiform from South Africa and the phylogenetic relationships of basal sauropodomorphs. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 174, 589-634.

Meroktenos Fabregues and Allain, 2016
M. thabanensis (Gauffre, 1993) Fabregues and Allain, 2016
= Melanorosaurus thabanensis Gauffre, 1993
Norian-Rhaetian, Late Triassic
Lower Elliot Formation, Lesotho
Holotype
- (MNHN.F.LES16c) femur (480 mm)
Referred- ....(MNHN.F.LES16a) ?dorsal neural arch, incomplete ilium (Fabregues and Allain, 2016)
....(MNHN.F.LES16b) pubis (~400 mm) (Fabregues and Allain, 2016)
....(MNHN.F.LES16d) metatarsal II (116 mm) (Fabregues and Allain, 2016)
?...(MNHN.F.LES351) cervical vertebra (87 mm), incomplete radius, ulna (203 mm) (Costedoat, 1962)
Diagnosis- (after Gauffre, 1993) femoral shaft significantly wider lateromedially than anteroposteriorly deep (eccentricity: 1.58) (modified after Fabregies and Allain, 2016); oblique fourth trochanter.
(after Fabregues and Allain, 2016) depth of ilial blade (from dorsalmost point of supracetabular crest to dorsal margin of ilium) 60% total height of ilium; subtriangular postacetabular process; stocky femur (length / circunference under fourth trochanter 2.09); straight femoral shaft in anterior and lateral views.
Comments- The material was discovered in 1959 and initially described as ?Gryponyx in Costedoat's (1962) thesis. After being noted as an unnamed melanorosaurid (Ellenberger, 1970), only the femur was described as a new species of Melanorosaurus by Gauffre (1993). Fabregues and Allain (2016) later reassigned this species to their new genus Meroktenos. Note while Fabregues and Allain listed MNHN.F.LES16a, b and d as part of the holotype, but since only MNHN.F.LES16c was listed as the holotype by Gauffre, no other materials can be added later, even if they belong to the holotype individual.
Fabregues and Allain entered Meroktenos in Yates' sauropodomorph matrix and found it to emerge as a non-sauropod anchisaurian, though Mussaurus and Sefapanosaurus were not included.
References- Costedoat, 1962. Étude de quelques reptiles fossiles. MS Thesis, Université de Paris.
Ellenberger, 1970. Les niveaux paléontologiques de première apparition des mammifères primordiaux en Afrique du Sud et leur ichnologie: Establissement de ones stratigraphiques détaillées dans le Stormberg du Lesotho (Afrique du Sud) (Trias Supérieur à Jurassique). In Haughton (ed.). I.U.G.S., 2nd symposium on gondwana stratigraphy and palaeontology. 343-370.
Gauffre, 1993. The most recent Melanorosauridae (Saurischia, Prosauropoda), Lower Jurassic of Lesotho, with remarks on the prosauropod phylogeny. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie. 11, 64-654.
Fabregues and Allain, 2016. New material and revision of Melanorosaurus thabanensis, a basal sauropodomorph from the Upper Triassic of Lesotho. PeerJ. 4, e1639.

Melanorosauridae Huene, 1929
Definition- (Melanorosaurus readi <- Anchisaurus polyzelus, Saltasaurus loricatus) (Yates, 2007)
Other definitions- (Melanorosaurus readi <- Anchisaurus polyzelus) (modified from Galton and Upchurch, 2004)
= Melanorosaurini Huene, 1929 vide Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991
References- Huene, 1929. Kurze Übersicht über die Saurischia und ihre natürlichen Zusammenhänge [A brief survey of the Saurischia and their natural context]. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 11, 269-273.
Kalandadze and Rautian, 1991. Late Triassic zoogeography and reconstruction of the terrestrial tetrapod fauna of North Africa. Paleontological Journal. 1, 1-12.
Galton and Upchurch, 2004. Prosauropoda. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (second edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 232-258.
Yates, 2007. The first complete skull of the Triassic dinosaur Melanorosaurus Haughton (Sauropodomorpha: Anchisauria). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 9-55.

Melanorosaurus