Tetanurae Gauthier, 1986
Definition- (Passer domesticus <- Ceratosaurus nasicornis) (Holtz et al., 2004; modified from Padian et al., 1999; modified from Gauthier, 1986)
Other definitions- (Allosaurus fragilis + Passer domesticus) (modified from Novas, 1992)
(Passer domesticus <- Torvosaurus tanneri) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
(Passer domesticus <- Ceratosaurus nasicornis, Carnotaurus sastrei) (Sereno, in press)
= "Tetanurae" Gauthier, 1984
= Intertheropoda Paul, 1988
= Avipoda Novas, 1992
= Tetanurae sensu Sereno, in press
Definition- (Passer domesticus <- Ceratosaurus nasicornis, Carnotaurus sastrei)
Comments- Most recently, Carrano et al. (2012) have published an extensive revision and phylogenetic analysis for non-coelurosaur members of this clade.
The addition of Carnotaurus as an external specifier by Sereno (in press) seems counter-productive. Tetanurae was designed as a stem away from Ceratosaurus, and abelisaurids were not explicitly discussed (having been named only a year prior). In fact, technically, Indosaurus and Indosuchus were classified as tetanurines by Gauthier (1986), since he lists them as carnosaurs. If abelisaurids are megalosauroids (as in Paul, 1988), it shouldn't stop megalosauroids from being tetanurines.
References- Benson, 2008. A new theropod phylogeny focussing on basal tetanurans, and its implications for European 'megalosaurs' and Middle Jurassic dinosaur endemism. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3), 51A.
Benson, 2009. Middle Jurassic theropods and the early evolution of tetanurans (Dinosauria, Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 62A.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

Chuandongocoelurus He, 1984
C. primitivus He, 1984
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Xiashaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China

Holotype- (CCG 20010) (2.4 m, 12 kg; juvenile?) anterior and posterior dorsal vertebrae, three sacral vertebrae, sacral vertebrae, caudal vertebrae, partial ilium, proximal pubis, proximal ischium, femora (201 mm), tibia (231 mm), distal tibia, proximal fibula, distal fibula, astragalus, calcaneum, incomplete metatarsal II, phalanx II-1 (30 mm), metatarsal III (122 mm), metatarsal IV (114 mm), phalanx IV-1 (16.5 mm), phalanx IV-2 (9 mm), phalanx IV-3 (10 mm), phalanx IV-4 (12 mm), pedal ungual IV (18 mm)
Diagnosis- base of preacetabular process less than half acetabular height; prominent anteriorly projecting process lateral to anterior trochanter on femur; medial condyle much larger than lateral condyle on tibia.
Other diagnoses- Though Carrano et al. (2012) state the dorsal centra and ilium are identical to Monolophosaurus, this is untrue.
Description- Although described by He Xinlu back in 1984, Chuandongocoelurus has been largely ignored in the literature. Little known is that He based the taxon on two specimens, one much larger than the other. While both include dorsal and caudal vertebrae, only those of the paratype were illustrated. Thus whether the paratype belongs to Chuandongocoelurus is unknown, and it is here discussed separately as an elaphrosaur. Carrano et al. (2012) were the first to note this situation in print and also thought the paratype was similar to Elaphrosaurus and thus unlikely to be Chuandongocoelurus. Comparing the femoral length to Elaphrosaurus, the holotype can be estimated to have measured 2.4 meters in length. Scaling from Paul's (1988) estimated mass of Elaphrosaurus results in a weight of 12 kilograms. The unfused sacral centra suggest it is young, which it would have to be if it is conspecific with the paratype.
The holotype's vertebrae were not illustrated in the paper, but are visible in a small unpublished photograph. The sacrals are moderately elongate and gently concave ventrally, and apparently unfused. The other vertebrae are more fragmentary, but some are more elongate and presumably distal caudals.
The pelvis is unfused and propubic, with the pubis about 27 degrees from the vertical. The preacetabular process is broken, but extended past the pubic peduncle and is dorsoventrally shallow, less than half of acetabular height. The dorsal edge of the ilium is fairly straight and there is no vertical ridge or other ornamentation laterally. The large pubic peduncle projects anteroventrally and is slightly expanded distally. There is an extensive supracetabular shelf that ends halfway through the ischial peduncle. The ischial peduncle is craniocaudally 42% as long as the pubic peduncle. The postacetabular process is broken off, but could not have been very tall.
Only the proximal section of the pubis is preserved. The dorsal margin of an obturator fenestra can be seen, although with the ventral margin incomplete, it could be an obturator notch. There is no room for a pubic fenestra below it.
Only the most proximal section of the ischium is preserved. Oddly, the ilial peduncle is much wider than the pubic peduncle, contrasting with the peduncles they attach to. No conclusion regarding obturator processes or flanges can be reached.
The femur is hollow and sigmoid in medial view. The head is anteromedially directed and declined ventrally. The anterior trochanter is a bit more massive than Dilophosaurus in proximal view and is hooked medially. There seems to be a smaller process directly lateral to the anterior trochanter. A trochanteric shelf is apparently absent. The fourth trochanter is smaller than Dilophosaurus, but much larger than the reduced process in Elaphrosaurus. Distally, the femur shows a very slight extensor groove and a deep rounded flexor groove without a cruciate ridge.
The tibia is quite elongate (15% longer than the femur) and slightly bowed laterally. The proximal end is craniocaudally elongate, has a single cranial cnemial crest and the lateral condyle is smaller than the medial condyle. The fibular crest cannot be distinguished. Distally, the astragalus backed the tibia. In distal view, the tibia is very anteroposteriorly narrow and roughly triangular.
The tibia, astragalus and calcaneum were unfused to each other. In the astragalus, the medial condyle is much larger, there seems to be no transverse groove extending across the condyles and the condyles are separated from the ascending process by a groove or excavation. The extent of the ascending process is uncertain, as it is broken proximally. However, it was obviously more prominent than ornithopods (contra Norman, 1990) and a bit more extensive than Dilophosaurus, possibly making the astragalus 83-93% as tall as wide. The anterior concavity of the astragalus in distal view is not as developed as coelurosaurs. The calcaneum was large and rectangular.
The metatarsus, though elongate (61% of femoral length), is not arctometatarsalian. Indeed, the third metatarsal is wider proximally than distally. I am wary of He's pedal reconstruction however, as metatarsal IV's distal end seems to be in lateral/medial view, as might metatarsal III's. Also, metatarsal II's broken distal end appears to be in posterior view. All this in a reconstruction of anterior view. Maybe they were twisted due to post-burial deformation or illustrated inaccurately. The proximal ends of metatarsals II and IV are flared outward. In proximal view, metatarsal II is more tapered anteriorly, metatarsal III more narrow, with a less expanded posterior end, and metatarsal IV is wider and more wedge-shaped than in Elaphrosaurus. A phalanx, identified as II-1, is shown backwards as its ginglymoid articulation is facing proximally. This phalanx probably is II-1, as it is nearly identical in comparative size and shape to that element in Elaphrosaurus. A series of apparently articulated phalanges are identified as digit IV. IV-1 is the largest and IV-2 is the shortest. They are all fairly similar in morphology, with lateral ligament pits and ginglymoid distal articulations where can be seen. The fact that IV-2 is the shortest leads to doubt they are articulated correctly, as this is never seen in theropods. An ungual phalanx is also preserved. It is short and gently curved, with no obvious flexor tubercle.
Relationships- Not many authors have attempted to classify Chuandongocoelurus. He (1984) assigned it to the Coeluridae (as did Dong, 1992), though I cannot read the Chinese text. Such an assignment is obviously based on small size, as the Coeluridae was the diminutive equivalent of the Megalosauridae at the time. In actuality, Chuandongocoelurus is much more primitive than Coelurus. Norman (1990) referred it to Theropoda indet., while noting the primitively broad scapula of the paratype, low ascending process and uncompressed third metatarsal. The low ascending process is actually broken, though it would be of ceratosauroid level if complete (after Welles and Long, 1974). The third metatarsal is compressed in proximal view, leading to an hourglass shape seen in neotheropods. Holtz (1992) thought the low ilium, pubic obturator foramen, very low astragalar ascending process and gracile metatarsus were most similar to Elaphrosaurus, but suggested retaining it as Theropoda incertae sedis. In 2001, I independently suggested it was a ceratosaur related to Elaphrosaurus (based partially on vertebral characters, as I was unaware the hypodigm belonged to two individuals), but this seems true only for the paratype. The first author to include the taxon in a published analysis, Benson (2008, 2010) found Chuandongocoelurus to be a non-megalosaurian megalosauroid, sister to Monolophosaurus. More recently, Carrano et al. (2012) and Rauhut et al. (2012) found it to be a tetanurine outside Orionides+Monolophosaurus, though when Carrano et al.'s matrix is properly ordered it is in a trichotomy with Monolophosaurus and Orionides.
Constraining Chuandongocoelurus to be a megalosauroid in Carrano et al.'s matrix leads to trees only 3 steps longer, so either arrangement is possible. Making it an elaphrosaur or coelurosaur is 7 steps longer though, so are less parsimonious.
References- He, 1984. The Vertebrate Fossils of Sichuan. Sichuan Scientific and Technological Publishing House. 168 pp.
Norman, 1990. Problematic Theropoda: "Coelurosaurs". In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press. 280-305.
Dong, 1992. Dinosaurian Faunas of China. China Ocean Press, Beijing. 188 pp.
Holtz, 1992. An unusual structure of the metatarsus of Theropoda (Archosauria: Dinosauria: Saurischia) of the Cretaceous. PhD thesis. Yale University. 347 pp.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076 pp.
Mortimer, DML 2001. http://dml.cmnh.org/2001Jun/msg00957.html
Benson, 2008. A new theropod phylogeny focussing on basal tetanurans, and its implications for European 'megalosaurs' and Middle Jurassic dinosaur endemism. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3), 51A.
Benson, 2010. A description of Megalosaurus bucklandii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Bathonian of the UK and the relationships of Middle Jurassic theropods. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 158(4), 882-935.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.
Rauhut, Foth, Tischlinger and Norell, 2012. Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 109(29), 11746-11751.

"Monolophosauridae" Bakker, 1997
Comments- While Bakker (1997) referred to monolophosaurids in an abstract, abstracts do not count for publication of new names in the ICZN (Article 9.10), so this is a nomen nudum.
Reference- Bakker, 1997. Megalosaurian mid-life crisis: Diversity, co-evolution and extinction at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 17(3), 30A.
Monolophosaurus Zhao and Currie, 1994
= "Jiangjunmiaosaurus" Anderson, 1987a
= "Monolophosaurus" Lambert, 1990
M. jiangi Zhao and Currie, 1994
= "Monolophosaurus jiangjunmiaoi" Dong, 1992
= "Monolophosaurus dongi" Grady, 1993
Bathonian-Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Wucaiwan Formation, China

Holotype- (IVPP 84019) (5.71 m) skull (670 mm), mandible, atlas, axis (61.8 mm), third cervical vertebra (67.1 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (69.3 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (70.6 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (69.6 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (67.8 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (72.3 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (68.4 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (67.3 mm), most cervical ribs, (dorsal series 942.3 mm) first dorsal vertebra (60 mm), second dorsal vertebra (60.6 mm), third dorsal vertebra (60.9 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (65.5 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (70 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (71.2 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (74 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (79.6 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (79.5 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (78.8 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (80.9 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (81.5 mm), thirteenth dorsal vertebra (79.8 mm), dorsal ribs 1-13, (sacrum 367.2 mm), first sacral vertebra (82.8 mm), second sacral vertebra (75.4 mm), third sacral vertebra (67.4 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (69.5 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (72.1 mm), first caudal vertebra (78 mm), second caudal vertebra (76.1 mm), third caudal vertebra (74.2 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (74.9 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (78.7 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (78.5 mm), ilia (498 mm), pubes (495 mm), ischia (390 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Zhao and Currie, 1994) anteroposteriorly elongate premaxilla; long, low external naris; antorbital sinuses in nasals confluent through openings in base of crest; skull with midline crest formed by premaxillae, nasals, lacrimals and frontals extending from above external naris to a point between orbits.
(after Brusatte et al., 2010) nasal process of premaxilla bifurcating posteriorly; lateral surface of premaxilla with deep groove between subnarial foramen and foramen on base of nasal process; nasal crest with straight dorsal margin nearly parallel to alveolar margin of maxilla; two enlarged, subequal pneumatic fenestrae in posterodorsal part of narial fossa; lacrimal with discrete, tab-like process projecting dorsally above preorbital bar; rectangular frontals, much wider than long (width/length=1.67).
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 1983 but not mentioned on paper until Anderson (1987b) notes that the then just-discovered Sinraptor dongi type "has been tentatively labelled a jiangjunmiaosaurus, a carnivore first found in the Junggar Basin in 1983 by Zhao Xi Lin." The name "Jiangjunmaiosaurus" was first used a month earlier in that journal, referencing the Sinraptor type as an individual of it. Lambert (1990) is the first author to use the name "Monolophosaurus", though its entry merely gives the etymology and refers the reader to the "Jiangjunmiaosaurus" entry. Dong (1992; though the latest included references are from 1990) mentions "Monolophosaurus jiangjunmiaoi" as a new allosaurid and provides a photo of the mounted skull and mandible. The reference given is "Zhao and Currie, in prep./press. A new large theropod from Jurassic strata of Xinjiang.", which is an early version of the eventual description. Currie and Zhao (1991) first report the specimen in the scientific literature, in an SVP abstract that mentions the cranial anatomy but does not attempt phylogenetic placement. The name "Monolophosaurus dongi" was used by Grady in his book on the Chinese-Canadian Dinosaur Project, which was written prior to the final description by Zhao and Currie (1994) officially naming it Monolophosaurus jiangi. The etymology indicates Jiangjunmiao translates to "General Jiang's Temple", so the species name still reflects what the taxon was originally nicknamed for. Note that while volume 30(10) of the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences lists its date as October 1993, it was not published until February or March of 1994. Brusatte et al. (2010) recently redescribed the skull, while Zhao et al. (2010) redescribed the postcrania. Unfortunately, Zhao et al. state the specimen is "deeply embedded in hard foam for travelling exhibition", so one side of it cannot be examined.
Relationships- Zhao and Currie (1994) placed Monolophosaurus as a basal tetanurine ("megalosaurid-grade"), but also suggested it may be a basal allosaurid (closer to Allosaurus than to Sinraptor). Sereno et al. (1994) placed it within Allosauridae, while most authors have found it resolves as a basal carnosaur (Holtz, 1996; Holtz, 2000; Holtz et al., 2004; Novas et al., 2005; Yates, 2005). However, Holtz (1995) and Smith et al. (2007) recovered Monolophosaurus as the sister taxon to Avetheropoda. Rauhut's (2000) placement was similar, as the sister taxon of Afrovenator+Allosauroidea within a Carnosauria containing megalosauroids. Benson (2008, 2010) found it to be a basal megalosauroid related to Chuandongocoelurus, though his updated analysis (Benson et al., 2010) placed the latter genus more ambiguously. Most recently, Carrano et al. (2012) found Monolophosaurus to be a non-orionidan tetanurine closer to Orionides than Chuandongocoelurus, though when the matrix is properly ordered it is in a trichotomy with Chuandongocoelurus and Orionides.
However, only one more step is needed to make it a non-megalosaurian megalosauroid, so this placement is extremely tentative. In addition, it takes 4 more steps to place it as a carnosaur and 5 more steps to place it sister to Avetheropoda, so no alternative can be firmly rejected.
References- Anderson, 1987a. Chinese dinosaur dig strikes bonanza. New Scientist. 1584, 25.
Anderson, 1987b. Chinese unearth a dinosaurs' graveyard. New Scientist. 1586, 28-29.
Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book. New York, Avon Books. 320 pp.
Currie and Zhao, 1991. Two new theropods from the Jurassic of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 11(3), 24A.
Dong, 1992. Dinosaurian Faunas of China. Ocean Press/Springer-Verlag, Beijing/Berlin. 188 pp.
Grady, 1993. The Dinosaur Project: The Story of the Greatest Dinosaur Expedition Ever Mounted. Edmonton: Ex Terra Foundation. Toronto: Macfarlane Walter & Ross. 61 pp.
Sereno, Wilson, Larsson, Dutheil and Sues, 1994. Early Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Sahara. Science. 266, 267-271.
Zhao and Currie, 1994. A large crested theropod from the Jurassic of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 30(10), 2027-2036.
Holtz, 1995. A new phylogeny of the Theropoda. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 15(3), 35A.
Holtz, 1996. Phylogenetic analysis of the nonavian tetanurine dinosaurs (Saurischia: Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 16(3), 42A.
Holtz. 2000. A new phylogeny of the carnivorous dinosaurs. GAIA. 15, 5-61.
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). PhD thesis. University of Bristol. 440 pp.
Holtz, Molnar and Currie, 2004. Basal Tetanurae. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 71-110.
Novas, de Valais, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 2005. A large Cretaceous theropod from Patagonia, Argentina, and the evolution of carcharodontosaurids. Naturwissenschaften. 92, 226-230.
Yates, 2005. A new theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and its implications for the early evolution of theropods. Palaeontologia Africana. 41, 105-122.
Smith, Makovicky, Hammer and Currie, 2007. Osteology of Cryolophosaurus ellioti (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Early Jurassic of Antarctica and implications for early theropod evolution. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 151, 377-421.
Benson, 2008. A new theropod phylogeny focussing on basal tetanurans, and its implications for European 'megalosaurs' and Middle Jurassic dinosaur endemism. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3), 51A.
Benson, 2010. A description of Megalosaurus bucklandii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Bathonian of the UK and the relationships of Middle Jurassic theropods. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 158(4), 882-935.
Benson, Brusatte and Carrano, 2010. A new clade of large-bodied predatory dinosaurs (Theropoda: Allosauroidea) that survived to the latest Mesozoic. Naturwissenschaften. 97, 71-78.
Brusatte, Benson, Currie and Zhao, 2010. The skull of Monolophosaurus jiangi (Dinosauria: Theropoda) and its implications for early theropod phylogeny and evolution. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 158(3), 573-607.
Zhao, Benson, Brusatte and Currie, 2010. The postcranial skeleton of Monolophosaurus jiangi (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, China, and a review of Middle Jurassic Chinese theropods. Geological Magazine. 147(1), 13-27.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

Allosaurus? tendagurensis Janensch, 1925
= Antrodemus tendagurensis (Janensch, 1925) Huene, 1932
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Holotype- (MB R 3620; = 67 of Janensch) incomplete tibia (~910 mm)
Comments- Chure (2000) stated this specimen resembles abelisaurids because it lacks a strongly curved cnemial crest or incisura tibialis and has no posterior groove between the lateral and medial condyles, but differs from them in that the astragalus is not fused to it and the fibular crest is more distally placed. However, the depth of the incisura tibialis is uncertain since Rauhut (2011) indicates the low lateral projection distally may be due to erosion. Furthermore, the posterior groove is present and was merely not indicated by Janensch's dotted line in the reconstruction. It also lacks the distally expanded cnemial crest of ceratosaurs (Carrano et al., 2012). The distally placed fibular crest is a tetanurine synapomorphy (which is fully compatible with a lack of tarsal fusion), as noted by Rauhut. Within Tetanurae, the astragalar step excludes tendagurensis from Coelurosauria, but its more detailed affinities are unknown. The broad fibular crest is similar to Piatnitzkysaurus, Megalosaurus and metriacanthosaurines
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monographien zur Geologie und Palaeontologie. 4(1), viii + 361 pp.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (UT-CO) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.
Rauhut, 2006. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tanzania and the origin of Cretaceous Gondwanan theropod faunas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(3), 113A.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

Fosterovenator Dalman, 2014
F. churei Dalman, 2014
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
(Reed's Quarry 12)
Holotype- (YPM VP 058267A-C) partial tibiotarsus
Diagnosis- (after Dalman, 2014) proximal tibial condyles round; medial condyle larger than lateral condyle; posterior intercondylar notch is deep and V-shaped; lateral condyle strongly removed from medial condyle.
Other diagnoses- Dalman (2014) also includes characters from the paratype supposed fibula (fibular shaft with uniform anteroposterior width throughout most of length; distal fibula anteroposterior width 90% of the width of proximal fibula), though this element is here excluded from the hypodigm.
Comments- Dalman (2014) described the theropod materials from Reed's Quarry 12, including this tibiotarsus and a supposed fibula (YPM VP 058267D) he made paratype of this new taxon. The latter element is unlike a theropod fibula in that its shaft lacks significant distal taper, and the distal end 84% as wide anteroposteriorly as the proximal end. As the distal end has a triangular outline similar to tetanurine tibiae, it may bne that element instead, in which case the proximal end is crushed and/or incomplete. YPM VP 058267D is from a larger individual than the holotype and as a fibula is incomparable or as a tibia lacks shared characters, so should not be referred to the same taxon.
Dalman presents a confused and contradictory account of Fosterovenator's relationships, officially assigning it to Ceratosauridae, then stating it "clearly belongs to a basal tetanuran", then saying it is "more closely related to Elaphrosaurus than to Ceratosaurus", and finally saying it and Morrison cf. Elaphrosaurus tibia DMNH 36284 "most likely represent the first occurrence of basal Late Jurassic abelisauroids in the Northern Hemisphere" based on supposed similarity to Tendaguru tibiae MB.R.1750 and MB.R.1751. Of course a ceratosaurid cannot be an abelisauroid or a tetanurine, but no evidence is presented in support of any of these positions. The tibia seems to be tetanurine based on the widely separated fibular crest and lateral condyle, unlike Ceratosaurus, Elaphrosaurus, DMNH 36284 or MB.R.1751. The short and distally thick cnemial crest and posteriorly widely separated proximal condyles are different from named Morrison genera (Ceratosaurus, Torvosaurus, Saurophaganax, Allosaurus, Tanycolagreus) as well as DMNH 36284 and NMMNH P-26093, so this may be a valid genus. If Dalman is correct that the astragalar buttress is rounded and nearly vertical and that the ascending process is likely taller than in Torvosaurus, Allosaurus and Coelurus, this may be a coelurosaur. Interpreting morphology from the low resolution photos with no indication of which surfaces are true vs. broken is difficult however, and the description is less than ideal, so determining Fosterovenator's exact relationships could be difficult.
Reference- Dalman, 2014. New data on small theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Como Bluff, Wyoming, USA. Volumina Jurassica. 12(2), 181-196.

Kaijiangosaurus He, 1984
K. lini He, 1984
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Xiashaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China

Holotype- (CCG 20020) atlantal intercentrum (19 mm), third cervical vertebra (69.5 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (91 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (78 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (81 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (90 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (74 mm)
Paratypes or Referred- (CCG coll.) jugal, nine teeth (35x14.7x8.2 mm; 29.7x13.3x7.4 mm; ?x16.3x7.3 mm; 21.6x9.4x5.9 mm), two dorsal centra, four proximal caudal centra, three distal caudal vertebrae (~68 mm), incomplete scapula, coracoid, humerus (~170 mm), incomplete ulna (~108 mm), three metacarpals, three manual unguals (~68 mm), proximal tibia, proximal fibula, metatarsal II (283 mm), partial phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, pedal ungual II, partial metatarsal III (315 mm), partial phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, pedal ungual III, incomplete metatarsal IV (291 mm), phalanx IV-1 (~95 mm), phalanx IV-2 (~50 mm), phalanx IV-3 (~40 mm), phalanx IV-4 (~26 mm), pedal ungual IV (~56 mm) (He, 1984)
?(CCG coll.) femur (400 mm) (He, 1984)
Comments- The material comes from at least two individuals, the femur being comparatively smaller than the other elements. The description has yet to be translated from Chinese, leaving many details unknown to Western scientists (such as whether the non-cervical elements are officially paratypes). Carrano et al. (2012) suggested the cervical morphology indicated a basal tetanurine or basal neotheropod. Entering it into Carrano et al.'s matrix results in a position inside Tetanurae but excluded from Megalosauria and Avetheropoda.
References- He, 1984. [The Vertebrate Fossils of Sichuan]. Sichuan Scientific and Technical Publishing House, Chengdu, Sichuan. 168 pp.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

Megalosaurus? "dapukaensis" Zhao, 1985
?= Megalosaurus? "cachuensis" Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004
Middle Jurassic
Middle Dapuka Group, Tibet, China

Comments- This specimen was first reported by Zhao (1983) who while discussing the evolution of dinosaurs in China noted "carnosaurs (Megalosaurus)" in the Middle Jurassic. It might be surmised Zhao was referring to an undescribed Chinese specimen of Megalosaurus, which is strengthened by the later mention of a new Megalosaurus species from the same deposits as other Middle Jurassic taxa Zhao mentions ("Ngexisaurus", "Lancanjiangosaurus", "Microdontosaurus", "Changtusaurus"). As with other new Tibetan taxa listed by Zhao (1983), it was probably supposed to be described by Zhao in the published version of his doctoral dissertation "The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China", in the second Palaeontology of Xizang volume. Yet this volume is only referenced by Zhao (1983; which was submitted in September 1981) and seems never to have been printed, though the previous volume was published by the IVPP in 1980 and the third by the NIGP in 1981. Olshevsky (DML, 1999) notes the IVPP rejected the paper as unpublishable. Zhao (1985) lists the new species Megalosaurus dapukaensis as being a carnosaur from the Dabuka Group of Tibet. It is listed as an undescribed ?megalosaurid from the Dapuka Group of Xizang Zizhiqu by Weishampel (1990). Zhang and Li (1997) list this theropod as being from the Middle Dabuka Formation of Dabuka, Qamdo County, Xizang. Weishampel et al. (2004) list it as ?Megalosaurus cachuensis from the Dapuka Group of Xinjiang, Uygur Zizhiqu and questionably refer it to Tetanurae (note this is not simply due to it being referred to Megalosaurus, as other questionable Megalosaurus species in that section are only referred to Theropoda). The species "cachuensis" is presumably an error, perhaps caused by "Lancanjiangosaurus cachuensis" from the same locality. It is listed as the megalosaurid Megalosaurus tibetensis Zhao gen. et sp. nov. (MS) in Fang et al. (2006), suggesting that "cachuensis" was indeed an error, and that Zhao's monograph was never published and is still a manuscript. Of course Fang et al. are in error in attributing the genus Megalosaurus to Zhao's manuscript. It may be referrable to Megalosaurus or Tetanurae, but has not been described or figured so remains a nomen nudum.
References- Zhao, "1983" [unpublished]. The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China. The Series of the Scientific Expeditions to the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Palaeontology of Xizang. 2, 1-200.
Zhao, 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 28(1-2), 295-306.
Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Zhao and Cheng, 1985. The Qamdo-Simao Subregion. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 174-179.
Weishampel, 1990. Dinosaurian distribution. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria. University of California Press. 63-139.
Zhang and Li, 1997. Mesozoic Dinosaur Localities in China and Their Stratigraphy. In Wolberg, Sump and Rosenberg (eds.). Dinofest International, Proceedings of a Symposium sponsered by Arizona State University. A Publication of The Academy of Natural Sciences. 265-273.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 517-606.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

"Megalosaurus" inexpectatus del Corro, 1966
Albian-Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Bayo Overo Member of the Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Holotype- (MACN 18.172) tooth (42.9 mm)
Paratypes- (MACN coll.) four teeth
Comments- del Corro (1974) notes that this taxon has wrinkled enamel similar to Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, though Carrano et al. (2012) specify it only has banding, as in Monolophosaurus, piatnitzkysaurids, megalosaurines, carnosaurs and megaraptorans. Its age suggests it is an avetheropod.
References- del Corro, 1966. Un nuevo Dinosaurio carnivoro del Chubut. Communicaciones del Museuo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" e Institutio Nacional de Investigacion de las Ciencias Naturales: Paleontologia. 1(1), 1-4.
del Corro, 1974. Un nuevo megalosaurio (Carnosaurio) del Crétacico de Chubut (Argentina) [A new megalosaur (Carnosauria) from the Cretaceous of Chubut (Argentina)]. Communicaciones del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" e Institutio Nacional de Investigacion de las Ciencias Naturales: Paleontología. 1(5), 37-44.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

"Megalosaurus" pannoniensis Seeley, 1881
Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Gosau Formation, Austria

Holotype- (PIUW coll.) tooth (21x~10x6 mm), partial tooth
Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Csehbanya Formation, Hungary

Referred- ?(V.01.54, V.01.20, V.01.30, V.2003.04-08, V 2008.36.1-51) 27 teeth, 31 tooth fragments (Osi et al., 2010)
Comments- Osi et al. (2010) described numerous teeth from a slightly earlier formation, which overlapped M. pannoniensis in a morphometric study. They referred all of the teeth to basal Tetanurae (comparing them favorably with Megalosaurus and Dubreuillosaurus) based on the "general shape of the crown, the crown base length/width, the crown curvature, the morphology of the carinae (especially the development pattern of the mesial carina)." Carrano et al. (2012) also considered M. pannoniensis to be a tetanurine based on slight enamel wrinkles (as in Monolophosaurus, piatnitzkysaurids, megalosaurines, non-carcharodontosaurine carnosaurs and megaraptorans) and mesial serrations which are absent basally, though they suggested the high DSDI (~1.75) could indicate relationship to basal tyrannosauroids or dromaeosaurids. Its age suggests it is an avetheropod.
Lapparent (1947) referred fragmentary cranial remains, manual phalanges and a fibula to Megalosaurus pannoniensis, but these were later referred to Dromaeosauridae by Allain and Taquet (2000). Three tooth fragments and three unguals from the Late Campanian-Maastrichtian of Viso, Portugal were referred to Megalosaurus pannoniensis by Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957). They are here listed as Neotheropoda indet..
References- Seeley, 1881. On the reptile fauna of the Gosau Formation preserved in the Geological Museum of the University of Vienna. Q. J. Geol. Soc. London 37: 620-707.
Sauvage, 1898. Vertébrés fossiles du Portugal: Contributions à l'étude des poissons et des reptiles du jurassique et du crétacique. Direction des Travaux Geologiques du Portugal. Memoires. Comissão do Serviço Geológico de Portugal. 1-46.
Lapparent, 1947. Les dinosauriens du Crétacé supérieur du midi de la France. Mémoire de la Société géologique de France. 56, 1-54.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal [The dinosaurs of Portugal]. Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série. 2, 1-63.
Allain and Taquet, 2000. A new genus of Dromaeosauridae (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of France. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(2), 404-407.
Osi, Apesteguia and Kowalewski, 2010. Non-avian theropod dinosaurs from the early Late Cretaceous of Central Europe. Cretaceous Research. 31(3), 304-320.

"Mifunesaurus" Hisa, 1985
Middle Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kabu Formation of the Mifune Group, Japan

Material- (YNUGI 10003; Mifune-ryu) (~6-7 m) maxillary tooth (72.7 mm)
Comments- This tooth was discovered in 1979, and described in 1984 by Hawegawa and Murata. They referred it to Megalosauridae gen. et. sp. indet., and nicknamed it Mifune-ryu. Hisa (1985) later gave it the nomen nudum "Mifunesaurus" in an illustrated booklet on dinosaurs. It was illustrated and described in detail by Hasegawa et al. (1992), who referred it to Megalosauridae based on similarity to Duriavenator, Gasosaurus and a Chinese specimen of unknown stratigraphic origin probably incorrectly referred to Megalosaurus bucklandii. They thought it was distinct from other named theropods in its low basal width to crown length ratio (.17), but this is also seen in ceratosaurids, for instance. It remains a nomen nudum because Hawegawa et al. did not name the tooth, while Hisa's (1985) description was apparently deficient. While Chure (2000) stated some of the teeth from the Kabu Formation have enamel wrinkles, Chure et al. (1999) show he was referring to a tooth from the Jobu Formation (MDM 341). Additional remains from the Jobu Formation of the Mifune Group (Tamara et al., 1991- four teeth, tibia, fibula, metatarsals II and III) are sometimes referred to "Mifunesaurus" as well, but although Chure (2000) stated the teeth were similar, there are no reported synapomorphies which would allow placing them in the same taxon.
The tooth crown is 72.7 mm tall, with a FABL of 22.5 mm and a basal width of 12.3 mm. It is recurved and lens shaped in section, with almost symmetrically distributed carinae. There are 20 serrations per 5 mm on both mesial and distal carinae. Blood grooves are present at least posteriorly, but enamel ridges are absent. "Mifunesaurus"' tooth seems too thick to be a ceratosaurid, and taller than in abelisaurids, so is probably from a non-maniraptoriform tetanurine, such as a megalosauroid or carnosaur.
References- Hasegawa and Murata, 1984. First record of carnivorous dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Kyushu, Japan. Abstract of the Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Japan.
Hisa, 1985. Kyoryu zukan [Dinosaur Picture Book]. Shinchosa, Tokyo. 223 pp.
Dong, Hasegawa and Azuma, 1990. The Age of Dinosaurs in Japan and China. Fukui, Japan: Fukui Prefectural Museum. 65 pp.
Tamara, Okazaki and Ikegami, 1991. Occurence of carnosaurian and herbivorous dinosaurs from upper formation of Mifune Group, Japan. Memiors of the Faculty of Education, Kumamoto University. 40, 31-45.
Hasegawa, Murata, Wasada and Manabe, 1992. The first carnosaur (Saurischia; Theropoda) from Japan; A tooth from the Cenomanian Mifune Group of Kyushu. Science Reports of the Yokohama National University, Series 2. 39, 41-49.
Chure, Manabe, Tanimoto and Tomida, 1999. An unusual theropod tooth from the Mifune Group (Late Cenomanian to Early Turonian), Kumamoto, Japan. In Tomida, Rich, and Vickers-Rich (eds.). Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium. National Science Museum (Tokyo) Monographs. 15, 291-296.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.

Phaedrolosaurus Dong, 1973
P. ilikensis Dong, 1973
Valanginian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Lianmugin Formation of Tugulu Group, Xinjiang, China

Lectotype- (IVPP V 4024-1) (~7 m) tooth (31 mm)
Paralectotype- ?(IVPP V 4024-3) proximal femur
Diagnosis- Provisionally indeterminate.
Comments- Dong originally based this taxon on a tooth, partial hindlimb and proximal femur, all from different localities. Sues (1977) noted since the diagnosis is based on dental characters, the tooth should be the lectotype. Rauhut and Xu (2005) later made the hindlimb the holotype of a new species, Xinjiangovenator parvus, which they found to be a relative of Bagaraatan. Unfortunately, they neither mention the referred femur nor describe the tooth.
The tooth is about twice the size of Deinonychus, which would indicate a theropod about seven meters long.
According to Dong's figure, the tooth's outline is near identical to Deinonychus. It is compressed, recurved and serrated like most theropods. Serrations extend from the base to the tip of the distal carina, with eighteen serrations per five mm. The base of the mesial carina is smooth, but serrations are present starting halfway up. It is said to be thicker than Deinonychus teeth.
The proximal femur is briefly mentioned, but not described or illustrated. It was found at a separate site, so should not be regarded as Phaedrolosaurus. Barsbold and Osmolska (1999) note that this femur has a wing-like anterior trochanter. This excludes it from Maniraptora, which have either finger-like or fused anterior trochanters. The lack of further information makes a more exact placement within Neotheropoda impossible.
Both Molnar (pers. comm. to Glut 1989; in Glut, 1997) and Sues (1977) state that Phaedrolosaurus appears dromaeosaurid. Barsbold and Osmolska (1999) say the wing-like lesser trochantor is distinctly non-dromaeosaurid. Besides these opinions, authors have generally just placed this genus in the Dromaeosauridae without question. The tooth is said to be thicker than Deinonychus and Velociraptor, but thickness varies with position in the tooth row, and Bambiraptor and Atrociraptor also have generally thicker teeth than the former two genera. Carrano et al.'s tetanurine analysis suggests only tetanurine taxa have apically restricted mesial serrations in the Cretaceous, but further studies of ceratosaurs may find that the state is more widely distributed. Among tetanurines, only spinosaurids are definitely known in the Cretaceous, suggesting Phaedrolosaurus is most likely an avetheropod.
References- Dong, 1973. [Dinosaurs from Wuerho]. Memoirs of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Academia Sinica. 11, 45-52.
Sues, 1977. The skull of Velociraptor mongoliensis, a small Cretaceous theropod dinosaur from Mongolia. Paläontologische Zeitschrift. 51, 173-184.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076pp.
Barsbold and Osmólska, 1999. The skull of Velociraptor (Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 44, 189-219.
Rauhut and Xu, 2005. The small theropod dinosaurs Tugulusaurus and Phaedrolosaurus from the Early Cretaceous of Xinjiang, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(1), 107-118.

Prodeinodon? "tibetensis" Zhang and Li, 1997
Early Cretaceous
Lura Formation, Tibet, China
Material- (IVPP coll.)
Comments- This specimen was first reported by Zhao (1983) who while discussing the evolution of dinosaurs in China noted "the carnosaurs (Prodeinodon Osborn) began to specialize" in the Early Cretaceous. It might be surmised Zhao was referring to an undescribed Tibetan specimen of Prodeinodon, which is strengthened by the later mention of a new Prodeinodon species from the same deposits as other Early Cretaceous taxa Zhao mentions (?Microvenator, Monkonosaurus, ?Asiatosaurus). As with other new Tibetan taxa listed by Zhao (1983), it was probably supposed to be described by Zhao in the published version of his doctoral dissertation "The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China", in the second Palaeontology of Xizang volume. Yet this volume is only referenced by Zhao (1983; which was submitted in September 1981) and seems never to have been printed, though the previous volume was published by the IVPP in 1980 and the third by the NIGP in 1981. Olshevsky (DML, 1999) notes the IVPP rejected the paper as unpublishable. The species was first named by Zhang and Li (1997) as Prodeinodon tibetensis from the Laoran Formation of Laoran, Markam County, Tibet. It is near certainly the same specimen listed as Tetanurae indet. by Weishampel et al. (2004) from the Lura Formation of Xizang Zizhiqu. As the specimen has never been described or illustrated, it is a nomen nudum. Given the age and occurance in China, it is likely to be a tetanurine and as other Prodeinodon species are based on teeth this is likely for this species as well. However, there is still no published evidence for this or its generic referral.
References- Zhao, "1983" [unpublished]. The Mesozoic vertebrate remains of Xizang (Tibet), China. The Series of the Scientific Expeditions to the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Palaeontology of Xizang. 2, 1-200.
Zhao, 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 28(1-2), 295-306.
Zhang and Li, 1997. Mesozoic Dinosaur Localities in China and Their Stratigraphy. In Wolberg, Sump and Rosenberg (eds.). Dinofest International, Proceedings of a Symposium sponsered by Arizona State University. A Publication of The Academy of Natural Sciences. 265-273.
Olshevsky, DML 1999. http://dml.cmnh.org/1999Nov/msg00507.html
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 517-606.

"Saltriosaurus" Dalla Vecchia, 2001
Sinemurian, Early Jurassic
Saltrio Formation, Italy

Material- (MSNM V3664) (~8 m; 1.5 tons) lateral tooth (45 mm), twenty-one dorsal rib fragments, scapular fragment, incomplete furcula, humeri (one incomplete, one proximal), metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, partial phalanx II-2, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, manual ungual III, proximal tibial fragment, proximal fibula, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, incomplete metatarsal II, proximal metatarsal III, partial metatarsal IV
Comments- This specimen was discovered in 1996 and first announced at a press conference in 2000, mentioned in newspapers on November 10th. The nickname 'saltriosaur' was given to it, changed to "Saltriosaurus" in Della Vecchia's (2001) popular article, though he noted (pers. comm. to Olshevsky, 2001) Dal Sasso will be the official author once it is described. Dal Sasso has commented on the specimen in a few works, but has yet to officially describe or name it.
While Dal Sasso originally suggested it might be a basal tetanurine, he later (2003, 2004) also proposed the possibility it is a carnosaur. Benson (2010) considered Dal Sasso's (2003) evidence for tetanurine affinity to be questionable. When added to Carrano et al.'s (2012) matrix, it is a non-piatnitzkysaurid, non-spinosaurid, non-allosaurian, non-coelurosaur tetanurine.
References- Dal Sasso, 2001. Update on Italian dinosaurs. 6th European Workshop on Vertebrate Paleontology. Abstract volume, 27.
Dalla Vecchia, 2001. A new theropod dinosaur from the Lower Jurassic of Italy, Saltriosaurus. Dino Press. 3, 81-87.
Olshevsky, 2001. http://dml.cmnh.org/2001May/msg00244.html
Dal Sasso, 2003. Dinosaurs of Italy. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2(1), 45-66.
Dal Sasso, 2004. Dinosaurs of Italy. Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis. 213 pp.
Benson, 2010. The osteology of Magnosaurus nethercombensis (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) of the United Kingdom and a re-examination of the oldest records of tetanurans. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 8(1), 131-146.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed tetanurine (Owen, 1842)
Early Toarcian, Early Jurassic
Jet Rock Formation, England
Material
- (Ripley coll.; lost) incomplete anterior dorsal vertebra (87 mm)
Comments- This was originally referred to Streptospondylus cuvieri by Owen (1842), though that taxon lived much later and no unique characters are shared by the two now that more basal tetanurine anterior dorsals are known. The parapophysis is smaller and more ventrally placed than in S. cuvieri, though this may be positional variation. The opisthocoelous centrum is tetanurine, and while Carrano et al. (2012) stated the single pleurocoel is, this is also present in Cryolophosaurus and "Dilophosaurus" sinensis.
References- Owen, 1842. Report on British fossil reptiles. Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. 11, 60-204.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed Tetanurae (Janensch, 1925)
Late Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Material- (MBR 1936; = TL 43) (juvenile) posterior dorsal centrum (86 mm)
....(MBR 2163; = TL 44) (juvenile) mid dorsal centrum (89 mm)
....(lost; = TL 8) (juvenile) first dorsal centrum (73 mm)
(MBR 2161; = TL 46c and 46d) incomplete distal caudal vertebra, partial distal caudal vertebra
....(MBR 2165; = TL 46a and 46b) distal caudal vertebra (105 mm), partial distal caudal vertebra
(MBR 3622; = TL 30) femur (825 mm)
....(MBR 3623; = TL 16) femur (822 mm)
....(MBR 3624; = TL 42) tibia (807 mm)
Comments- Janensch (1920) initially referred the dorsal centra to Ceratosaurus (followed by Madsen and Welles, 2000), though he later (1925) was more cautious. Rauhut (2011) found them to be a tetanurine based on the strong ventral keel, though further assignment is difficult (besides exclusion from clades with pleurocoelous posterior dorsals). Rauhut could only identify the hindlimb elements to non-coelurosaurian Tetanurae, and the distal caudals to Tetanurae.
References- Janensch, 1920. Uber Elaphrosaurus bambergi und die Megalosaurier aus den Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafricas. Sitzungsberichte Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde Berlin. 8, 225-235.
Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. 1(supp. 7), 1-99.
Rauhut, 2011. Theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology. 86, 195-239.

unnamed tetanurine (Ricqles, 1967)
Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation of the Tegama Group, Niger
Material
- partial manual ungual I
Comments- This specimen was described by Ricqles (1967) as dinosaurian, and Rozhdestveksky (1970) placed it in Theropoda. Nessov (1995) referred it to Therizinosauria or "groups most closely related to them" (which in his opinion consisted of spinosaurids and dryptosaurids). The ungual closely resembles both Baryonyx and Alxasaurus, though it tapers more than the former and is less curved than the latter.
References- Ricqles, 1967. La paleontologie de terrain: Un bilan international. Atomes. 243, 337-341.
Rozhdestvensky, 1970. Giant claws of enigmatic Mesozoic reptiles. Paleontological Journal. 1970(1), 131-141.
Nessov, 1995. Dinosaurs of nothern Eurasia: new data about assemblages, ecology, and paleobiogeography. Institute for Scientific Research on the Earth's Crust, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg. 1-156.

unnamed tetanurine (He, 1984)
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Xiashaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China

Material- three cervical vertebrae, two anterior dorsal vertebrae, proximal caudal vertebra, coracoid, ischium, tibia, fibula, metatarsal
Comments- This specimen was originally referred to Szechuanosaurus, but was found to be an indeterminate basal tetanurine by Chure (2000).
References- He, 1984. The Vertebrate Fossils of Sichuan. Sichuan Scientific and Technical Publishing House, Chengdu, Sichuan. 168 pp.
Li, Zhang and Cai, 1998. The Characteristics of the Composition of the Trace Elements in Jurassic Dinosaur Bones and Red Beds in Sichuan Basin:.Geological Publishing House, Beijing. 155 pp.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. PhD thesis. Columbia University. 964 pp.

unnamed Tetanurae (Nessov, 1995)
Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Balabansai Svita, Kyrgyzstan
Material
- (ZIN PH 7/42) tooth (31.5x17x11.5 mm)
(ZIN PH 8/42) tooth (31.2x11.9x10 mm)
(ZIN PH 9/42) tooth (26.8x12x6 mm)
(ZIN PH 10/42) tooth (30.1x12.3x11.9 mm)
(ZIN PH 11/42) tooth (24.2x10.9x6 mm)
(ZIN PH 12/42) tooth (21.1x8.7x6.7 mm)
(ZIN PH 13/42) tooth
(ZIN PH 14/42) tooth (18.7x7x5.1 mm)
(ZIN PH 15/42) tooth (13x6.6x3.7 mm)
(ZIN PH 16/42) tooth (13.2x6.7x4.3 mm)
(ZIN PH 17/42) tooth (?x6x3 mm)
(ZIN PH 18/42) tooth (9.2x3.3x3 mm)
(ZIN PH 19/42) tooth (17x8x4.3 mm)
(ZIN PH 20/42) tooth (10.2x6.8x3.6 mm)
(ZIN PH 26/42) tooth (44.4x17.5x8.9 mm)
(ZIN PH 27/42) tooth (?x21.8x13.4 mm)
(ZIN PH 28/42) tooth (17x9.7x3.8 mm)
(ZIN PH 29/42) tooth (4.9x3.5x2.2 mm)
Comments- Nessov (1995) identified these as cf. coelurid and megalosaurid, while Averianov et al. (2005) stated all variation could be ontogenetic and positional. They believed the teeth resembled dromaeosaurids primarily in the basally unserrated mesial carina, but Carrano et al. (2012) noted this and other characters were consistent with basal tetanurines too.
References- Nessov, 1995. Dinosaurs of nothern Eurasia: New data about assemblages, ecology, and paleobiogeography. Institute for Scientific Research on the Earth's Crust, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg. 1-156.
Martin and Averianov, 2004. Middle Jurassic vertebrates from Kyrgyzstan (central Asia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 24(3), 277A.
Averianov, Martin and Bakirov, 2005. Pterosaur and dinosaur remains from the Middle Jurassic Balabansai Svita in the northern Fergana depression, Kyrgyzstan (central Asia). Palaeontology. 48(1), 135-155.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

unnamed tetanurine (Goodwin et al., 1999)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Mugher Mudstone, Ethiopia

Material- (UCMP 170802) partial tooth
(UCMP 172477) tooth fragment
(UCMP 172478) fragmentary tooth
Comments- Referred to cf. Acrocanthosaurus sp. by Goodwin et al. (1999), but this is unlikely given the provenance. The referral was only due to rectangular serrations, which are plesiomorphic for theropods. Carrano et al. (2012) notes the presence of enamel wrinkles means the specimens are tetanurine.
References- Goodwin, Clemens, Hutchison, Wood, Zavada, Kemp, Duffin and Schaff, 1999. Mesozoic continental vertebrates with associated palynostratigraphic dates from the northwestern Ethiopian plateau. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(4), 728-741.
Carrano, Benson and Sampson, 2012. The phylogeny of Tetanurae (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(2), 211-300.

undescribed Tetanurae (Manabe and Barrett, 2000)
Valanginian-Hauterivian, Early Cretaceous
Kuwajima Formation of the Tetori Group, Japan
Material
- (SBEI-008) tooth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
(SBEI coll.) teeth (Matsuoka et al., 2002)
Comments- These large teeth were announced as tyrannosaurid in Barrett and Manabe's (2000) abstract, but Matsuoka et al. (2002) merely calls them Theropod Type A. The enamel wrinkles are tetanurine and the high labiolingual compression is like Fukuiraptor, but not tyrannosaurids. Given their age and location, it would not be surprising if they were megaraptoran.
References- Barrett and Manabe, 2000. The dinosaur fauna from the Earliest Cretaceous Tetori Group of Central Honshu, Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20(3), 28A-29A.
Matsuoka, Kusuhashi, Takada and Setoguchi, 2002. A clue to the Neocomian vertebrate fauna: Initial results from the Kuwajima 'Kaseki-kabe' (Tetori Group) in Shiramine, Ishikawa, central Japan. Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Series of Geology and Mineralogy. 59(1), 33-45.

undescribed tetanurine (Naish and Martill, 2007)
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Kimmeridge Clay, England
Material
- cervical vertebrae, dorsal vertebrae, sacral vertebrae, caudal vertebrae, pelvic elements, hindlimb elements
Comments- This specimen was mentioned as a "peculiar, gracile tetanurine" by Naish (online, 2006) and is due to be studied. Naish and Martill (2007) mention it in print as pers. comm. from Powell.
References- Naish, online 2006. http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/2006/12/obscure-dinosaurs-of-kimmeridge-clay.html
Naish and Martill, 2007. Dinosaurs of Great Britain and the role of the Geological Society of London in their discovery: Basal Dinosauria and Saurischia. Journal of the Geological Society, London. 164, 493-510.

unnamed tetanurine (Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012)
Late Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Eumeralla Formation of the Otway Group, Victoria, Australia

Material- (NMV P208234) (adult) dorsal vertebra (18 mm)
Reference- Benson, Rich, Vickers-Rich and Hall, 2012. Theropod fauna from Southern Australia indicates high polor diversity and climate-driven dinosaur provinciality. PLOS One. 7(5), e37122.

unnamed tetanurine (Stromer, 1934)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Baharija Formation, Egypt

Material- (IPHG 1912 VIII 76) tibia (575 mm) (Stromer, 1934)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 190) tibia (Stromer, 1934)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 192) tibia (660+ mm) (Stromer, 1934)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kem Kem beds, Morocco

tibia (630 mm) (Lavocat, 1954)
Comments- Stromer described three tibiae from the Baharija Formation of Egypt and assigned them to Elaphrosaurus. The distally placed fibular crest and high ascending process suggest this is a tetanurine. Lavocat (1954) described a tibia from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco that he thought was very similar to Stromer’s material, but had a differently developed cnemial crest.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharije-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abhandlungen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Abteilung, Neue Folge. 22, 1-79.
Lavocat, 1954. Sur les dinosauriens du Continental Intercalaire des Kem-Kem de la Daoura [On the dinosaurs from the Continental Intercalaire of the Kem Kem of the Doura]. Comptes Rendus 19th Intenational Geological Congress, 1952. 1, 65-68.

undescribed Tetanurae (Reynolds, 1939)
Early Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Chipping Norton Limestone Formation (= Charlbury Formation), England

Material- (GSM 37523) dorsal vertebra (Welles and Pickering, 1999)
(SDM 44.17) proximal scapula (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.22) humerus (Reynolds, 1939)
Comments- Reynolds (1939) misidentified SDM 44.22 as an ischium. He referred the SDM material to Megalosaurus sp., while Welles and Pickering (1999) referred it to "Metriacanthosaurus" "reynoldsi". However, I view their hypodigm of the latter species as mixing Megalosaurus bucklandii material and a unique ilium from Oakham Quarry. Which of these taxa, if either, this material belongs to is unknown.
References- Reynolds, 1939. A collection of reptile bones from the Oolite near Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire. Geological Magazine. 76, 193-214.
Welles and Pickering, 1999. Megalosaurus bucklandii. Private publication of Stephen Pickering, An extract from Archosauromorpha: Cladistics & Osteologies. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project. 119 pp.

undescribed Tetanurae (Carrano, 1998)
Late Cretaceous?
Alberta, Canada?
Material
- (RTMP 81.10.2) femur (317 mm)
(RTMP 81.10.2?) femur (180.7 mm)
(RTMP 91.40.16) femur (195.1 mm)
Comments- These are listed as Tetanurae in Carrano's (1998) table without locality information, but if they are from Late Cretaceous Alberta, they are likely maniraptoriforms or juvenile tyrannosaurids.
Reference- Carrano, 1998. The evolution of dinosaur locomotion: Functional morphology, biomechanics, and modern analogs. PhD Thesis, The University of Chicago. 424 pp.

unnamed tetanurine (Naish, 1999)
Berriasian-Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Hastings Beds, England
Material
- (BMNH R9385) partial tibia (~250 mm)
Comments- Naish (1999) described this as a non-coelurosaurian tetanurine.
Reference- Naish, 1999. Theropod dinosaur diversity and palaeobiology in the Wealden Group (Early Cretaceous) of England: Evidence from a previously undescribed tibia. Geologie en Mijnbouw. 78, 367-373.

undescribed Tetanurae (Welles and Pickering, 1999)
Early-Middle Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Sharp's Hill Formation, England

Material- (OUM J13720) proximal caudal vertebra (Welles and Pickering, 1999)
(OUM J29799) proximal caudal vertebra (Welles and Pickering, 1999)
Comments- This material was referred to "Metriacanthosaurus" "reynoldsi" by Welles and Pickering (1999), but I view their hypodigm of the latter species as mixing Megalosaurus bucklandii material and a unique ilium from Oakham Quarry. Which of these taxa, if either, this material belongs to is unknown.
Reference- Welles and Pickering, 1999. Megalosaurus bucklandii. Private publication of Stephen Pickering, An extract from Archosauromorpha: Cladistics & Osteologies. A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project. 119 pp.

unnamed tetanurine (Rauhut, 2002)
Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Canadon Asfalto Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- (MPEF PV 1717) partial maxillae, nasal fragments, partial palatines
Comments- Rauhut (2002) initially considered this a ceratosaur, but described it in 2007 as a basal tetanurine. While it differs from Piatnitzkysaurus, it cannot be compared to Condorraptor.
References- Rauhut, 2002. Dinosaur evolution in the Jurassic: A South American perspective. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(3), 89A.
Rauhut, 2007. A fragmentary theropod skull from the Middle Jurassic of Patagonia. Ameghiniana. 44(2), 479-483.

unnamed basal tetanurine (Rauhut, 2005)
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Middle Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania

Material- (MB.R 1763) tibia (163 mm)
Comments- Originally described as 'coelurosaurier A', Rauhut (2005) has identified it as a basal tetanurine.
References- Janensch, 1925. Die Coelurosaurier und Theropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas. Palaeontographica. (Supp. 7)1, 1-99.
Rauhut, 2005. Post-cranial remains of 'coelurosaurs' (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Tanzania. Geological Magazine. 142(1), 97-107.

undescribed tetanurine (Pol and Rauhut, 2012)
Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Canadon Asfalto Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- distal caudal vertebra, metatarsal IV
Comments- Pol and Rauhut (2012) note this as a basal tetanurine much larger than Piatnitzkysaurus or Condorraptor.
Reference- Pol and Rauhut, 2012. A Middle Jurassic abelisaurid from Patagonia and the early diversification of theropod dinosaurs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 279(1741), 3170-3175.

undescribed tetanurine (Rauhut and Diego, 2012)
Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Canadon Asfalto Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Material- incomplete skull (~800 mm), presacral column, scapulae, coracoids, complete forelimbs, partial pubis, partial hindlimbs including tibia, fibula and metatarsal IV
Comments- Pol and Rauhut (2012) note this as a large partially articulated basal tetanurine. Rauhut and Diego (2012) report tetanurine characters (maxillary fenestra; single pair of cervical pleurocoels; fibular flange on tibia that is offset from proximal end; well-developed posteromedial process of proximal end of metatarsal IV) as well as characters more basal than most tetanurines (apneumatic anterior dorsal vertebrae; short and distally strongly expanded scapula). Within Tetanurae, it shares characters with both megalosauroids (medially closed maxillary fenestra; U-shaped ventral postorbital process; broad groove on basioccipital below occipital condyle; lack of medial depression on proximal fibula) and carnosaurs (large antorbital fossa with associated foramina in nasal; raised lateral rims the nasal; well-developed lacrimal horn with two pneumatic recesses; pneumatic foramen in jugal; antarticular; metacarpal III <35% of metacarpal II width). They suggested this could indicate carnosaurian megalosauroids or high amounts of homoplasy.
Reference- Pol and Rauhut, 2012. A Middle Jurassic abelisaurid from Patagonia and the early diversification of theropod dinosaurs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 279(1741), 3170-3175.
Rauhut and Diego, 2012. A new basal tetanuran theropod from the Early Middle Jurassic of Patagonia, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts 2012, 160.

undescribed tetanurine (Apesteguia and Bonaparte, 2004)
Late Berriasian-Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Bajada Colorada Formation, Neuquen, Argentina
Material
- (MMCH-PV-68-6) (large) tooth (Gallina, Apesteguia, Haluza and Canale, 2014)
fragmentary femur (Apesteguia and Bonaparte, 2004)
Comments- The distal femur noted by Apesteguia and Bonaparte (2004) is said to have a promiment fourth trochanter, weak extensor groove, and moderately developed mediodistal crest. The authors state it resembles Streptospondylus in having a medially projected tibial condyle and wide intercondylar groove.
References- Apesteguia and Bonaparte, 2004. Bajada Colorada (Valanginian) dinosaurs from Neuquen: Note on the oldest Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Neuquen basin. XX Jornadas Argentinas de Paleontologia de Vertebrados, resumenes. 34R.
Canale, Apesteguia, Gallina, Haluza, Gianechini and Pazo, 2014. Theropod remains from the Bajada Colorada Formation (Berriasian-Valanginian) from Neuquen Province, Argentina. Reunion de Comunicaciones de la Asociacion Paleontologica Argentina, abstracts. Ameghiniana. 52(1) suplemento, 5.