Sauropoda Marsh, 1878
Definition- (Saltasaurus loricatus <- Melanorosaurus readi) (Yates, 2007)
Other definitions- (Cetiosaurus oxoniensis, Diplodocus longus, Brachiosaurus altithorax, Titanosaurus indicus <- Plateosaurus engelhardti) (modified from McIntosh, 1997)
(Vulcanodon karibaensis + Diplodocus longus) (modified from Salgado et al., 1997)
(Saltasaurus loricatus <- Plateosaurus engelhardti) (Wilson, 2005; modified from Wilson and Sereno, 1998)
(Saltasaurus loricatus <- Jingshanosaurus xinwaensis, Mussaurus patagonicus) (Sereno, 2007)
= Cetiosauria Owen, 1859
= Diplodocia Tornier, 1913
Comments- While Cope (1883) used Opisthocoela as an alternative name for Sauropoda, it is actually a misspelling of Owen's (1860) Opisthocoelia. As Opisthocoelia was erected to include not only "Cetiosaurus" medius and Pelorosaurus but also the theropod Streptospondylus, it is a better equivalent of Saurischia than Sauropoda. Tornier (1913) used Diplodocia as an alternative name for Sauropoda.
References- Owen, 1859. On the Classification and Geographical Distribution of the Mammalia. John W. Parker and Son, West Strand. London. 103 pp.
Owen, 1860. Palaeontology, or a Systematic Summary of Extinct Animals and their Geological Relations. Second Edition. Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh. 463 pp.
Cope, 1883. On the characters of the skull in the Hadrosauridae. Proceedings of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences. 35, 97-107.
Tornier, 1913. Reptilia. Handwörterbuch der naturwissenschaften. 8, 315-376.
Marsh, 1878. Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part I. American Journal of Science and Arts. 16, 411-416.
McIntosh, 1997. Sauropoda. In Currie and Padian (eds.). Encyclopedia of Dinsoaurs. Academic Press, San Diego. 654-658.
Salgado, Coria and Calvo, 1997. Evolution of titanosaurid sauropods. I: Phylogenetic analysis based on the postcranial evidence. Ameghiniana. 34(1), 3-32.
Wilson and Sereno, 1998. Early evolution and higher-level phylogeny of sauropod dinosaurs. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Memoir 5. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(2 suppl), 68 pp.
Wilson, 2005. Overview of sauropod phylogeny and evolution. in Curry Rogers and Wilson (eds.). The Sauropods: Evolution and Paleobiology. University of California Press, Berkeley. 15-49.
Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.
Yates, 2007. Solving a dinosaurian puzzle: the identity of Aliwalia rex Galton. Historical Biology. 19(1), 93-123.

Antetonitrus

Lessemsaurus

Leonerasaurus Pol, Garrido and Cerda, 2011
L. taquetrensis Pol, Garrdo and Cerda, 2011
Early Jurassic?
Upper Member of the Las Leoneras Formation, Chubut, Argentina
Holotype
- (MPEF-PV 1663) partial dentary, three teeth, incomplete axis, incomplete third cervical vertebra (40.8 mm), incomplete fourth cervical vertebra (47.1 mm), incomplete fifth cervical vertebra (50.8 mm), partial sixth cervical vertebra, partial seventh cervical vertebra, partial eighth cervical vertebra, ninth cervical vertebra, tenth cervical vertebra, incomplete first dorsal vertebra (40.1 mm), incomplete second dorsal vertebra (38 mm), incomplete third dorsal vertebra (41.8 mm), partial fourth dorsal vertebra (42.3 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra, ?sixth dorsal vertebra, incomplete mid dorsal vertebra (42.7 mm), incomplete mid dorsal vertebra, incomplete mid dorsal vertebra, fragmentary posterior dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, incomplete first sacral vertebra (46.9 mm), incomplete fused second and third sacral vertebra (43, 43 mm), partial fourth sacral vertebra, incomplete scapula, incomplete humerus (202.8 mm), incomplete ilia, pubic fragment, incomplete ischium, femoral fragment, metatarsal I (67 mm), partial metatarsal II, incomplete pedal ungual
Diagnosis- (after Pol et al., 2011) anterior teeth with low, spoon-shaped crowns (SI = 1.3); dorsosacral rib attached to preacetabular process of ilium (also in Lufengosaurus); primordial sacral neural arches positioned on anterior half of centrum; caudosacral rib directed anterolaterally; deltopectoral crest low and medially deflected along distal half; flattened ischial shafts (also in Anchisaurus).
Comments- Pol et al. (2011) added Leonerasaurus to Yates' sauropodomorph matrix and recovered it as sister to Melanorosaurus+Sauropoda. More recently, McPhee et al. (2015) recovered Leonerasaurus as sauropod more derived than Antetonitrus and Lessemsaurus, but more basal than other included sauropods.
References- Pol, Garrido and Cerda, 2011. A new sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of Patagonia and the origin and evolution of the sauropod-type sacrum. PLoS ONE. 6(1), e14572.
McPhee, Bonnan, Yates, Neveling and Choiniere, 2015. A new basal sauropod from the pre-Toarcian Jurassic of South Africa: Evidence of niche-partitioning at the sauropodomorph-sauropod boundary? Scientific Reports. 5, 13224.

Chinshakiangosaurus

"Damalosaurus" Zhao, 1983
= "Damalasaurus" Zhao, 1985
"D. laticostalis" Zhao, 1985
?= "Damalasaurus magnus" Zhao, 1985
Etymology- Named for Damala Mountain in Qamdo, with the species referring to wide ribs (laticostalis) or large size (magnus).
Early Jurassic
Middle Daye Group, Daye, Qamdo County, Tibet, China
Material
- (~15 m) specimen including dorsal rib
Comments- The species is listed as "magnus" in the text, but "laticostalis" in the plate caption. Olshevsky (1991) listed "laticostalis as the type, though I consider it probable only one species is intended by Zhao since two are never present in faunal lists together (Zhao and Cheng, 1985; Zhang and Li, 1997; Fang et al., 2006). Fang et al. use "laticostalis" for the species, suggesting it is the intended one since Zhao is a coauthor. Zhao (1985) includes a photograph of a dorsal rib in situ, which the length estimate above is taken from assuming proportions like Barapasaurus. Glut (1997) incorrectly stated it is Middle Jurassic in age. Weishampel et al. (2004) list this as an undescribed sauropod in their faunal list.
Relationships- Stated by Zhao (1983, 1985) to be a primitive sauropod. Chure and McIntosh (1989) listed it as a cetiosaurid, while Lambert (1990) and Olshevsky (1991) listed it as a brachiosaurid. Glut (1997) only listed it as Sauropoda incertae sedis. Fang et al. (2006) place it in Cetiosauridae, noting again it's a primitive sauropod. As those authors placing it in Brachiosauridae have never seen the specimen, and brachiosaurids are currently unknown from Asia or the Early Jurassic, that assignment seems less likely. Since Cetiosauridae is currently viewed as a grade of basal eusauropods, "Damalosaurus" is here placed as Sauropoda incertae sedis.
References- Zhao, 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 28(1-2), 295-306.
Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Zhao and Cheng, 1985. The Qamdo-Simao Subregion. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 174-179.
Chure and McIntosh, 1989. A Bibliography of the Dinosauria (Exclusive of the Aves) 1677-1986. Museum of Western Colorado Paleontology Series #1. 226 pp.
Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book. New York: Avon Books. 320 pp.
Olshevsky, 1991. A Revision of the Parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, Excluding the Advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076 pp.
Zhang and Li, 1997. Mesozoic Dinosaur Localities in China and Their Stratigraphy. In Wolberg, Sump and Rosenberg (eds.). Dinofest International, Proceedings of a Symposium sponsered by Arizona State University. A Publication of The Academy of Natural Sciences. 265-273.
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria: Second Edition. University of California Press. 517-606.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

"Yibinosaurus" Ouyang vide anonymous, 2001
"Y. zhoui" Ouyang vide anonymous, 2001
Toarcian, Early Jurassic
Dongyuemiao Member of Ziliujing Formation, Sichuan, China
Material
- (Chongqing Museum of Natural History coll.) specimen including dorsal vertebrae
Comments- This name originally appeared in a guidebook, with the taxon stated to be under study by Ouyang. Ouyang (2003) later mentioned it in his thesis as a new genus, which he places in an eponymous subfamily within Vulcanodontidae. As he also includes the more basal Gongxianosaurus in Vulcanodontidae, Ouyang's conception of the family may be more of a grade. Ouyang further notes the anterior dorsal neural spines are transversely expanded, which he believes indicates a possible relationship to taxa with bifurcated spines like Datousaurus. As Ouyang states "Yibinosaurus" is from the same locality as Gongxianosaurus, the dorsal vertebrae, 51 articulated caudal vertebrae, scapulae and ilium mentioned by Luo and Wang (1999) as Gongxianosaurus sp. nov. may be the "Yibinosaurus" material.
References- Luo and Wang, 1999. New discovery on dinosaur fossils from Early Jurassic, Sichuan, China. Chinese Science Bulletin. 44(23), 2182-2188.
Anonymous, 2001. Dinosaur Fossils from Chongqing Natural History Museum.
Ouyang, 2003. Skeletal characteristics of Mamenchisaurus youngi and the systematics of mamenchisuarids. PhD thesis. Chengdu University of Technology. 176 pp.

Zizhongosaurus? "huangshibanensis" Li vide Li, Zhang and Cai, 1999
Jurassic
Red Beds, Sichuan, China
Comments-
This name has only appeared in the abstract (and faunal list?) of Li et al. (1999), so is a nomen nudum. Whether it is properly referred to Zizhongosaurus is thus uncertain.
Reference- Li, Zhang and Cai, 1999. The Characteristics of the Composition of the Trace Elements in Jurassic Dinosaur Bones and Red Beds in Sichuan Basin, Geological Publishing House, Beijing. 155 pp.

undescribed sauropod (Joyce, 2004)
Early Jurassic
Hanson Formation, Antarctica
Material
- (Augustana College coll.) (~9 m) vertebrae, pelvis, limb elements
Comments- Discovered in 2003, to be described by Hammer.
References- Joyce, 2004. Digging for dinosaurs in Antarctica: Giant bones suggest icy continent had warmer past. NPR, 1-23-2004.

Gongxianosaurus

Kunmingosaurus Zhao vide Dong, 1992
K. wudingensis Zhao vide Dong, 1992
= "Kunmingosaurus wudingi" Zhao, 1985
= "Kunmingosaurus utingensjs" Zhao, 1985
= "Kunmingosaurus utingi" Zhen, Li and Rao, 1986
= "Kunmingosaurus wudingensis" anonymous, 1990 vide Olshevsky, 1991
Etymology- Kunming is the capital city of Yunnan, while Wuding is the county and basin the specimen was found in.
Hettangian, Early Jurassic
Zhangjiawa Member of the Lufeng Formation, Hoshaofang, Wuding County, Yunnan, China

Syntypes- (IVPP coll.) (~11 m) incomplete skeleton including dorsal vertebrae, eight proximal caudal vertebrae, four chevrons, ilium, pubis, femur (~847 mm), tibia, fibula, astragalus, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, pedal ungual I, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, pedal ungual II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, pedal ungual III, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, metatarsal V, phalanx V-1
....(BNHM,PZGR 74) dentary (Young, 1966)
....(BNHM,PZGR 75) dentary (Young, 1966)
Referred- ?(FMNH CUP 2042) maxilla (Barrett, 1999)
?(IVPP coll.) tooth (Upchurch and Barrett, 2000)
Comments- The species name is spelled "wudingi" in the text, and "utingensjs" in the figure caption, which as noted by Chure and McIntosh (1989) are probably unintentional variants, and the latter no doubt a mispelling of "utingensis".
The skeleton was discovered by Su in 1954, but the dentaries were only discovered later in 1960 and described and illustrated by Young (1966) as specimens of Lufengosaurus magnus. Dong (1992) referred them to the same individual as the postcrania since they came from the same quarry. While Dong (and later Olshevsky, 2000) was incorrect in stating Zhao described the taxon in 1985, his own book contains a diagnosis, type and illustration so would seem to validate the nomenclature (contra Barrett, 1999). Indeed, Upchurch et al. (2004) attribute the name to Dong, 1992. A photo of part of the mounted skeleton is in Zhao (1985), contra Barrett (1999). Dong et al. (1990) published a photograph of the entire skeleton, and several are available online as well. Li et al. (2010) note Kunmingosaurus lacks dorsal pleurocoels and has a poorly developed fourth trochanter.
Simmons (1965) described a maxilla (FMNH CUP 2042) from Ta Ti in the same beds as Yunnanosaurus robustus, which is similar to Kunmingosaurus in having a sauropodan lateral plate and serrated, spatulate teeth with a lingual ridge. Barrett (1999) redescribed it as a sauropod maxilla, though he did not refer it to any genus. Upchurch and Barrett (2000) described a referred tooth.
Relationships- Stated by Zhao (1985) to be a primitive sauropod. Chure and McIntosh (1989) and Lambert (1990) listed it as a cetiosaurid, while Olshevsky (1991) listed it provisionally as a barapasaurid and Dong (1992) as a shunosaurine camarasaurid. Upchurch and Barrett (2000) discussed it as a 'vulcanodontid', which was a grade of basal sauropods in their scheme, and described a referred tooth. Upchurch (1995) noted there was no published evidence suggesting it was a vulcanodontid, however. He later (1998) noted that Kunmingosaurus' teeth were more plesiomorphic than Barapasaurus, Shunosaurus, Patagosaurus and other taxa in having only a shallow lingual concavity and being quite labiolingually compressed. Barrett (1999) considered the dentaries to be sauropod based on the dorsoventrally expanded symphysis and lateral plate. Fang et al. (2006) list it as a camarasaurid.
When entered into a modified version of Wilson's (2002) analysis, Kunmingosaurus emerges more derived than Chinshakiangosaurus, Antetonitrus, Lessemsaurus and Blikanasaurus but less than eusauropods (so is not a cetiosaurid, barapasaurid, shunosaurid or camarasaurid). It is thus related to taxa such as Gongxianosaurus, Kotasaurus, Spinophorosaurus, Tazoudasaurus and Vulcanodon, so may be considered vulcanodont-grade. Note the results agree with Upchurch's (1998) statements, though his dental characters were not used by Wilson. Specifically, Kunmingosaurus is more derived than Chinshakiangosaurus based on the D-shaped teeth and reduced fourth trochanter, but less derived than Shunosaurus based on no crown-to-crown occlusion, straight dorsal ilial margin and unreduced pedal phalanges.
References- Simmons, 1965. The non-therapsid reptiles of the Lufeng Basin, Yunnan, China. Fieldiana, Geology. 15, 1-93.
Young, 1966. On a new locality of the Lufengosaurus of Yunnan. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 10(1), 64-67.
Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Zhen, Li and Rao, 1986. Dinosaur footprints of Jinnin, Yunnan. Memoirs of the Beijing Natural History Museum. 33, 19pp.
Chure and McIntosh, 1989. A Bibliography of the Dinosauria (Exclusive of the Aves) 1677-1986. Museum of Western Colorado Paleontology Series #1. 226 pp.
Dong, Hasegawa and Azuma, 1990. The Age of Dinosaurs in Japan and China. Fukui, Japan: Fukui Prefectural Museum. 65 pp.
Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book. New York: Avon Books. 320 pp.
Olshevsky, 1991. A Revision of the Parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, Excluding the Advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Dong, 1992. Dinosaurian Faunas of China. China Ocean Press (Beijing). 192 pp.
Upchurch, 1995. The evolutionary history of sauropod dinosaurs. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B. 349, 365-390.
Upchurch, 1998. The phylogenetic relationships of sauropod dinosaurs. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 124, 43-103.
Barrett, 1999. A sauropod dinosaur from the Lower Lufeng Formation (Lower Jurassic) of Yunnan Province, People's Republic of China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(4), 785-787.
Martin-Rolland, 1999. Les sauropodes chinois [The Chinese sauropods]. Revue Paléobiologie, Genève. 18(1), 287-315.
Olshevsky, 2000. An Annotated Checklist of Dinosaur Species by Continent. Mesozoic Meanderings. 3, 157 pp.
Upchurch and Barrett, 2000. The evolution of sauropod feeding mechanisms. in Sues (ed.). Evolution of Herbivory in Terrestrial Vertebrates: Perspectives from the Fossil Record. Cambridge Press. 79-123.
Upchurch, Barrett and Dodson, 2004. Sauropoda. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria: Second Edition. University of California Press. 259-322.
Weishampel, Barrett, Coria, Le Loeuff, Xu, Zhao, Sahni, Gomani and Noto, 2004. Dinosaur Distribution. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria: Second Edition. University of California Press. 517-606.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

Amygdalodon Cabrera, 1947
A. patagonicus Cabrera, 1947
Late Toarcian-Early Aalenian, Early-Middle Jurassic
Cerro Carnerero Formation, Chubut, Argentina

Lectotype- (MLP 46-VIII-21-1/2) posterior dorsal centrum (~150 mm)
Paralectotypes- (MLP 46-VIII-21-1/1) posterior dorsal centrum (140 mm)
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/3) partial mid caudal vertebra (140 mm)
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/4) partial mid caudal vertebra (148 mm)
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/5) dorsal rib fragment
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/6) anterior dorsal neural spine
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/7) posterior cervical prezygapophysis
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/8) anterior or mid cervical centrum (258 mm)
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/9) dorsal rib fragment
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/10) flat fragment
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/11) dorsal rib fragment
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/12) maxillary tooth (22.7 mm)
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/13) dentary tooth
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/14) tooth root
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/15) upper tooth (23.8 mm)
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/16) tooth root
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/17) tooth
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/18; lost) tooth
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1/19) incomplete pubis
?(MLP 46-VIII-21-1 coll.; three lost) three cervical rib fragments, seven dorsal rib fragments
Referred- (MLP 36-XI-10-3/1) partial posterior dorsal vertebra (~143 mm) (Casamiquela, 1963)
....(MLP 36-XI-10-3/3) dorsal rib fragment (Casamiquela, 1963)
?(MLP 36-XI-10-3/2) partial first sacral centrum (Casamiquela, 1963)
?(MLP 36-XI-10-3/4) distal tibia (178 mm wide) (Casamiquela, 1963)
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2003) lateral walls of the neural canal and centropostzygapophyseal laminae flared laterally posteriorly; neural canal strongly flexed anteroposteriorly within the dorsal neural arches.
(after Carballido and Pol, 2010) spoon-shaped teeth with low SI values (1.34-1.49); enamel wrinkled forming a pattern of pits and narrow apicobasal sulci; absence of denticles in both mesial and distal margins (also in Kotasaurus and Shunosaurus); wear facets extending mostly along one margin of the crowns.
Other diagnoses- Cabrera (1947) listed several characters in his diagnosis. The teeth were said to be similar to Apatosaurus (as Brontosaurus), but comparatively larger. However, the supposed Apatosaurus tooth cited by Cabrera is from Camarasaurus, so was not correctly associated with the Apatosaurus postcrania. In addition, which postcrania the Amygdalodon teeth belonged to is unknown. Apneumatic dorsal centra with pleurofossae are primitive. A pubis "similar to atlantosaurids" is vague, but may indicate the straight anterior margin noted in the text to be more like Apatosaurus than Cetiosauriscus (as Cetiosaurus leedsi) or Camarasaurus. A straight pubic shaft is also found in taxa such as Tazoudasaurus however.
Comments- Piatnitzky discovered the referred material in 1936 and mentioned it that year, though it was not described until Casamiquela did so in 1963. The type material was collected in 1936 and described the following year by Cabrera as a new taxon of cetiosaurid. Cabrera (1947) identified the dorsal neural spine as a caudal neural spine, while Casamiquela (1963) believed it was a dorsal diapophysis. The flat fragment has been identified as part of a scapula (Cabrera, 1947) and dorsal rib (Casamiquela, 1963), but Rauhut (2003) felt it didn't match any sauropod element and placed it as Reptilia indet.. Camasiquela identified the sacral centrum as a caudal centrum. The material was found in one area, but belongs to at least three individuals, with the cervical prezygapophysis largest, the dorsals medium sized, and the sacral smallest. Which individuals the other material belongs to is unknown, though there are at least two sizes of dorsal ribs. Whether all of the material belongs to the same taxon is unknown, though it is all congruent with a basal sauropod.
Carballido and Pol (2010) recently found this taxon to be a sauropod more derived than Chinshakiangosaurus but outside Gravisauria based on a version of Wilson's analysis. Lang's (2008) unpublished thesis finds it to be a shunosaurid though.
References- Piatnitzky, 1936. Estudio geológico de la region del Río Chubut y del Río Genua. Boletin de Informaciones Petroleras. 13(137), 83-118.
Cabrera, 1947. Un saurópodo nuevo del Jurásico de Patagonia. Notas del Museo de La Plata, Paleontología. 12, 1-17.
Casamiquela, 1963. Consideraciones acerca de Amygdalodon Cabrera (Sauropoda. Cetiosauridae) del Jurásico Medio de la Patagonia. Ameghiniana. 3(3), 79-95.
Rauhut, 2003. Revision of Amygdalodon patagonicus Cabrera, 1947 (Dinosauria, Sauropoda). Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fuer Naturkunde in Berlin: Geowissenschaftliche Reihe. 6, 173-181.
Lang, 2008. Les cetiosaures (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) et les sauropodes du Jurassique moyen: Revision systematique, nouvelles decouvertes et implications phylogenetiques. Thesis. Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle. 638 pp.
Carballido and Pol, 2010. The dentition of Amygdalodon patagonicus (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) and the dental evolution in basal sauropods. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 9, 83-93.

Archaeodontosaurus Buffetaut, 2005
A. descouensi Buffetaut, 2005
Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Isalo IIIb Formation, Madagascar
Holotype
- (MHNDPal 2003-396) partial dentary, several teeth
Diagnosis- (after Buffetaut, 2005) dentary which is markedly deeper anteriorly than posteriorly; at least 16 alveoli containing prosauropod-like lanceolate teeth with strong, well-defined denticles, a distinct lingual median ridge, and a finely wrinkled enamel.
Comments- Based on adding the taxon to Yates' sauropodomorph analysis, this is a sauropod less derived than Shunosaurus. A crown which expands markedly mesiodistally compared to the root may indicate it is more derived than Chinshakiangosaurus. However, Flynn et al. (2010) noted the locality and the mosaic of basal and derived features might indicate a relationship to the Malagasy basal archosauromorph Azendohsaurus, but the latter seems to lack a lingual ridge on its teeth and wrinkled enamel.
Reference- Buffetaut, 2005. A new sauropod dinosaur with prosauropod-like teeth from the Middle Jurassic of Madagascar. Bulletin de la Societé Géologique de France. 176(5), 467-473.
Flynn, Nesbitt, Parrish, Ranivoharimanana and Wyss, 2010. A new species of Azendohsaurus (Diapsida: Archosauromorpha) from the Triassic Isalo Group of southwestern Madagascar: Cranium and mandible. Palaeontology. 53(3), 669-688.

Eshanosaurus Xu, Zhao and Clark, 2001
E. deguchiianus Xu, Zhao and Clark, 2001
Hettangian, Early Jurassic
Lower Lufeng Formation, Yunnan, China

Holotype- (IVPP V11579) (mandible ~170 mm) dentary, partial splenial
Comments- This taxon was originally identified as a therizinosaur, despite its Early Jurassic age. It may be a sauropodomorph, especially since it lived so much earlier than any other avetheropod, and the fact the much later therizinosaur Falcarius is nonetheless less derived in respect to serration size, dentary curvature and the absence of a lateral dentary ridge. Most recently, Barrett (2009) notes that basal sauropodomorphs lack the anteriorly extensive well defined lateral dentary shelf, anteriorly increasing tooth size, more than thirty dentary teeth, lingual cingulum on teeth, apicobasally oriented lingual ridge on teeth, and tooth roots that expand mesiodistally to equal crown width.
References- Zhao and Xu, 1998. The oldest coelurosaurian. Nature. 394, 234-235.
Xu, Zhao and Clark, 2001. A new therizinosaur from the Lower Jurassic lower Lufeng Formation of Yunnan, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 21(3), 477-483.
Barrett, 2009. The affinities of the enigmatic dinosaur Eshanosaurus deguchiianus from the Early Jurassic of Yunnan Province, People's Republic of China. Palaeontology. 52(4), 681-688.

Isanosaurus

"Rutellum" Lhuyd, 1699
"R. impicatum" Lhuyd, 1699
Jurassic
Coral Rag, England
Material
- (University of Oxford coll. #1352; lost) tooth
Comments- Lhuyd (1699) illustrated this as a fish tooth, but the name is invalid as it was published before the earliest date for Linnaean nomenclature. Gunther (1945) referred it to Cetiosaurus. Delair and Sarjeant (2002) called it a cetiosaur. While the broad crown excludes it from Diplodocoidea and Lithostrotia, further resolution is difficult given the single figure. A crown which expands markedly mesiodistally compared to the root may indicate it is more derived than Chinshakiangosaurus.
References- Lhuyd, 1699. Lithophylacii Britannici Ichnographia, sive lapidium aliorumque fossilium Britannicorum singulari figura insignium. Gleditsch & Weidmann, London. 156 pp.
Gunther, 1945. Early Science in Oxford. Life and Letters of Edward Lhuyd, vol. 14. the Author, Oxford.
Delair and Sarjeant, 2002. The earliest discoveries of dinosaurs; the records re-examined. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 113, 185-197.

Pulanesaura McPhee, Bonnan, Yates, Neveling and Choiniere, 2015
P. eocollum McPhee, Bonnan, Yates, Neveling and Choiniere, 2015
Late Hettangian-Sinemurian, Early Jurassic
Upper Elliot Formation, South Africa
Holotype
- (BP/1/6882) incomplete anterior dorsal neural arch
Paratypes- ..(at least two individuals including the holotype) (BP/1/6183) mid dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6183a) posterior dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6184) proximal ischium
..(BP/1/6186) pedal ungual I (120 mm)
..(BP/1/6191) metacarpal IV (82 mm)
?.(BP/1/6193) incomplete humerus
..(BP/1/6199) incomplete anterior or mid cervical vertebra
..(BP/1/6200) tibia (520 mm)
..(BP/1/6201) proximal caudal vertebra
..(BP/1/6202) ischium
..(BP/1/6204) tooth
..(BP/1/6205) chevron
..(BP/1/6207) tooth
..(BP/1/6210) incomplete ulna
..(BP/1/6646) proximal caudal vertebra (85 mm)
..(BP/1/6752) clavicle (193 mm)
..(BP/1/6768) dorsal rib
..(BP/1/6770) mid dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/6980) tibia
..(BP/1/6983) proximal pedal ungual
..(BP/1/6984) incomplete anterior dorsal neural arch
..(BP/1/7366) incomplete ischium
..(BP/1/7741) mid or distal caudal vertebra
.. ilial fragment (lost), fibula (uncollected)
Diagnosis- (after McPhee et al., 2015) teeth with apicobasal grooves on both labial and lingual surfaces teeth with denticles restricted to apical third of crown; tooth crowns with extensive enamel wrinkling easily discernible with naked eye; anterior or mid cervical vertebra with anteroposteriorly short and dorsoventrally high neural spines; anterior or mid cervical vertebra with dorsally raised and obliquely set postzygapophyseal facets; anterior dorsal prezygapophyses mediolaterally extensive and sheet-like; anterior dorsal anterior infradiapophyseal fossae showing an externally constricted, medially-tapering, pinched morphology; dorsoventrally tall anterior dorsal neural spines, ~3 times taller than anteroposteriorly long; middle to posterior dorsal neural arches with neural spines >1.6 times as high as long; proximal caudal vertebra with incipient prezygadiapophyseal laminae; proximal caudal transverse processes laterally restricted, triangular in shape and located on both neural arch and centrum; proximal caudal centra almost twice as high dorsoventrally as anteroposteriorly long; proximal caudal centra lacking ventral sulcus; hyposphene on proximal caudal vertebra; mediolaterally expansive radial fossa on proximal ulna; tibia with proximal surface over twice as long anteroposteriorly than transversely wide; tibia with similarly transversely restricted shaft; transversely compressed first pedal ungual with convexly rounded proximoventral margin.
Comments- McPhee et al. (2015) recovered Pulanesaura as sister to vulcanodontids+gravisaurians using a version of Yates' matrix.
Reference- McPhee, Bonnan, Yates, Neveling and Choiniere, 2015. A new basal sauropod from the pre-Toarcian Jurassic of South Africa: Evidence of niche-partitioning at the sauropodomorph-sauropod boundary? Scientific Reports. 5, 13224.

Gravisauria Allain and Aquesbi, 2008
Definition-
(Tazoudasaurus naimi + Saltasaurus loricatus) (modified from Allain and Aquesbi, 2008)
References- Allain and Aquesbi, 2008. Anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Tazoudasaurus naimi (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the late Early Jurassic of Morocco. Geodiversitas. 30(2), 345-424.

Kotasaurus

Nebulasaurus Xing, Miyashita, Currie, You, Zhang and Dong, 2015
= "Nebulasaurus" Xing, Miyashita, Currie, You, Zhang and Dong, 2013 online
N. taito Xing, Miyashita, Currie, You, Zhang and Dong, 2015
= "Nebulasaurus taito" Xing, Miyashita, Currie, You, Zhang and Dong, 2013 online
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Zhanghe Formation, Yunnan, China
Holotype
- (LDRC-v.d.1) incomplete braincase
Diagnosis- (after Xing et al., 2015) exoccipitals nearly excluding supraoccipital from foramen magnum (supraoccipital forms less than a tenth of foramen magnum margin); supraoccipital not expanded laterally between parietal and exoccipital.
Comments- The paper naming this taxon was originally available online in 2013 but did not contain a ZooBank registration, so Nebulasaurus taito was a nomen nudum until officially published in 2015 (ICZN Article 8.5.3). Xing et al. (2015) added it to a version of Harris' sauropod matrix and recovered Nebulasaurus as the sister to Spinophorosaurus, in their phylogeny a non-neosauropod eusauropod.
Reference- Xing, Miyashita, Currie, You, Zhang and Dong, 2015. A new basal eusauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Yunnan, China, and faunal compositions and transitions of Asian sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(1), 145-154.

Spinophorosaurus

Tazoudasaurus

Vulcanodontidae Cooper, 1984
Definition- (Vulcanodon karibaensis <- Diplodocus longus) (modified from Allain et al., 2004)
References- Cooper, 1984. A reassessment of Vulcanodon karibaensis Raath (Dinosauria: Saurischia) and the origin of the Sauropoda. Palaeontologia Africana. 25, 203-231.
Allain, Aquesbi, Dejax, Meyer, Monbaron, Montenat, Rechir, Rochdy, Russell and Taquet, 2004. A basal sauropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of Morocco. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 3(3), 199-208.

Vulcanodon
Early Toarcian, Early Jurassic
Drakensburg Group, Zimbabwe

References- Yates, Hancox and Rubidge, 2004. First record of a sauropod dinosaur from the Upper Elliot Formation (Early Jurassic) of South Africa. South African Journal of Science. 100, 504-506.

Gravisauria incertae sedis

Zizhongosaurus Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983
Z. chuanchengensis Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983
Early Jurassic
Daanzhai Member of the Ziliujing Formation, Sichuan, China
Holotype
- (IVPP V9067) posterior dorsal neural arch, partial humerus, pubic fragment, fragments
Diagnosis- (after Dong et al., 1983) dorsal vertebrae with high neural spine with an apex as an expanded plate that descends slightly anteriorly and is concave posteriorly; lateral spine surface is ornamented with dorsally radiating vertical striations; diapophyses are well developed to form a right angle with the neural spine at the neural arch; hyposphene present; relatively long forelimbs; humerus with straight and rounded shaft.
Comments- Discovered in the 1980's. Originally referred to Cetiosaurinae and more lately to Vulcanodontidae, Zizhongosaurus has yet to be included in a phylogenetic analysis and will be difficult to evaluate given the brief description and single figure.
References- Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983. The dinosaurian remains from Sichuan Basin, China. Palaeontologia Sinica. 62(23), 1-145.

Eusauropoda Upchurch, 1995
= Bothrosauropodidae Janensch, 1929
= Bothrosauropodoidea Janensch, 1929 vide Kuhn, 1961
Definition- (Shunosaurus lii + Saltasaurus loricatus) (Wilson, 2005; modified from Upchurch et al., 2004)
Other definitions- (Barapasaurus tagorei + Diplodocus longus) (modified from Salgado et al., 1997)
(Saltasaurus loricatus <- Vulcanodon karibaensis) (Sereno, 2007; modified from Wilson and Sereno, 1998)
Comments- Upchurch (1995) erected Eusauropoda for his clade containing euhelopodids and neosauropods, but not Vulcanodon or Barapasaurus. This makes the explicit inclusion of Barapasaurus in Salgado et al.'s definition problematic. While both Upchurch et al.'s and Wilson and Sereno's definitions have similar current content, only the former equates to Eusauropoda in Upchurch's 1995 topology, so is preferred here.
Janensch (1929) erected Bothrosauropodidae (which is invalid, as there is no genus Bothrosauropus) for cetiosaurines, camarasaurines and brachiosaurines.
References- Janensch, 1929. Material und Formegehalt der Sauropoden in der Ausbeute der Tendaguru-Expedition, 1909-1912 [Material and figured content of sauropods in the yield of the Tendaguru Expedition, 1909-1912]. Palaeontographica. Supplement VII (1), 2(1), 3-34.
Kuhn, 1961. Die Familien der rezenten und fossilen Amphibien und Reptilien. Verlaghus Meisenbach KG, Bamberg. 79 pp.
Upchurch, 1995. The evolutionary history of sauropod dinosaurs. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B. 349, 365-390.
Salgado, Coria and Calvo, 1997. Evolution of titanosaurid sauropods. I: Phylogenetic analysis based on the postcranial evidence. Ameghiniana. 34(1), 3-32.
Wilson and Sereno, 1998. Early evolution and higher-level phylogeny of sauropod dinosaurs. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Memoir 5. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(2 suppl), 68 pp.
Upchurch, Barrett and Dodson, 2004. Sauropoda. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (2nd edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 259-322.
Wilson, 2005. Overview of sauropod phylogeny and evolution. in Curry Rogers and Wilson (eds.). The Sauropods: Evolution and Paleobiology. University of California Press, Berkeley. 15-49.
Sereno, 2007. Basal Sauropodomorpha: Historical and recent phylogenetic hypotheses, with comments on Ammosaurus major (Marsh, 1889). Special Papers in Palaeontology. 77, 261-289.

Shunosauridae McIntosh, 1990 vide Durand, 2005
Shunosaurinae McIntosh, 1990
Reference- McIntosh, 1990. Sauropoda. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds). The Dinosauria, Berkeley: University of California Press. 345-401.
Durand, 2005. Major African contributions to Palaeozoic and Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology. Journal of African Earth Sciences. 43(1-3), 53-82.
Shunosaurus

Cardiodontidae Lydekker, 1895
Reference- Lydekker, 1895. On bones of a sauropodous dinosaur from Madagascar. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 51, 329-336.
Cardiodon

Rhoetosaurus Longman, 1926
R. brownei Longman, 1926
Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Hutton Sandstone Formation of the Injune Creek Group, Queensland, Australia

Holotype- (QM F1659) incomplete ?axis (446 mm), cervical vertebra, incomplete anterior dorsal vertebra (220 mm), three posterior dorsal vertebrae (~180 mm), posterior dorsal centrum, partial posterior dorsal centrum, two dorsal rib fragments, incomplete sacrum (16, 21 mm), fragmentary first caudal vertebra, fragmentary second caudal vertebra, fragmentary third caudal vertebra, fragmentary fourth caudal vertebra, incomplete fifth caudal vertebra (140 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (136 mm), incomplete seventh caudal vertebra (137 mm), incomplete eighth caudal vertebra (135 mm), ninth caudal centrum (135 mm), incomplete tenth caudal vertebra (140 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (142 mm), twelfth caudal centrum (160 mm), thirteenth caudal centrum (150 mm), fourteenth caudal centrum (158 mm), fifteenth caudal centrum (150 mm), sixteenth caudal vertebra (152 mm), seventeenth caudal centrum (158 mm), eighteenth caudal centrum (157 mm), nineteenth caudal centrum (155 mm), twentieth caudal centrum, distal caudal vertebra (157 mm), five distal caudal vertebrae, fragmentary caudal vertebrae, several chevron fragments, ilial fragments, incomplete pubes (~1.2 m), ischial fragments, incomplete femur (~1.53 m), tibia, fibula, astragalus, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, pedal ungual I, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, pedal ungual II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, pedal ungual III, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, pedal ungual IV, fragments
Diagnosis- (after Nair and Salisbury, 2009) multiple prominent medial crests on the distal tibia; concentric proximal fossa on the medial surface of the tibia; accessory fossae or grooves on the medial face of pedal unguals.
Comments- The first remains were discovered in 1924, with additional material in 1926 (Longman, 1927). Further material of the type specimen was discovered starting in 1975 and was described with a reanalysis of the taxon by Nair and Salisbury (2012). They find it to be a non-neosauropod gravisaur.
References- Longman, 1926. A giant dinosaur from Durham Downs, Queensland. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 8(3), 183-194.
Longman, 1927. The giant dinosaur: Rhoetosaurus brownei. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 9(1), 1-18.
Longman, 1929. Palaeontological notes: Rhoetosaurus brownei. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 9(3), 249.
Molnar, 1980. Australian late Mesozoic continental tetrapods: Some implications. Mémoires de la Société Géologique de France. 139, 131-143.
Thulborn, 1985. Rhoetosaurus brownei the giant Queensland dinosaur. in Vickers-Rich and van Tets (eds). Kadimakara: Extinct Vertebrates of Australia. Pioneer Design Studio, Melbourne. 166-171.
Long, 1998. Dinosaurs of Australia and New Zealand and Other Animals of the Mesozoic Era. UNSW Press. 192 pp.
Vickers-Rich, Rich and Hewitt, 1999. Wildlife of Gondwana. Indiana University Press. 304 pp.
Nair and Salisbury, 2007. Osteology and biomechanics of the crus and pes in Rhoetosaurus brownei Longman (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) from the Middle Jurassic Injune Creek Group of Roma, south-western Queensland. Geological Society of Australia Abstracts No. 85. 11th Conference on Australian Vertebrate Evolution, Palaeontology and Systematics. 58.
Nair and Salisbury, 2009. New anatomical information on Rhoetosaurus brownei (Dinosauria: Eusauropoda), from the Jurassic Injune Creek Group, near Roma, Queensland, Australia. Conference on Australian Vertebrate Evolution, Palaeontology and Systematics. Geological Society of Australia, Abstracts. 93, 76.
Nair and Salisbury, 2012. New anatomical information on Rhoetosaurus brownei Longman, a gravisaurian sauropodomorph from the Middle Jurassic of Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32(2), 369-394.

Barapasauridae Halstead and Halstead, 1981
Reference- Halstead and Halstead, 1981. Dinosaurs. Blanford Books. 170 pp.
Barapasaurus

Bellusaurinae Dong, 1987
= "Bellusaurinae" Dong, 1986
Comments- Dong (1986) first used "Bellusaurinae" in a faunal list. Though the official publication of Bellusaurinae is usually attributed to Dong (1990), a shorter version was published earlier in 1987.
References- Dong, 1986. [unknown title and journal]
Dong, 1987. [untitled section on saurischians] in Zhao et al. (eds.). Stratigraphy and Vertebrate Fossils of Xinjiang. Beijing, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology. 28-30.
Dong, 1990. Sauropoda from the Kelamaili region of the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang Autonomous Region. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 28(1), 43-58.
Bellusaurus

Cetiosauridae Lydekker, 1888
Definition- (Cetiosaurus oxoniensis <- Saltasaurus loricatus) (modified from Upchurch et al., 2004)
= Cetiosaurinae Lydekker, 1888 vide Janensch, 1929
References- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History). Part I. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum (Natural History), London. 309 pp.
Janensch, 1929. Material und Formegehalt der Sauropoden in der Ausbeute der Tendaguru-Expedition, 1909-1912 [Material and figured content of sauropods in the yield of the Tendaguru Expedition, 1909-1912]. Palaeontographica. Supplement VII (1), 2(1), 3-34.
Upchurch, Barrett and Dodson, 2004. Sauropoda. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds.). The Dinosauria (2nd edition). University of California Press, Berkeley. 259-322.
Cetiosaurus

Cetiosaurus? mogrebiensis

Chebsaurus

Lapparentosaurus

Patagosaurus

Tendaguriidae Bonaparte, Heinrich and Wild, 2000
Reference- Bonaparte, Heinrich and Wild, 2000. Review of Janenschia Wild, with the description of a new sauropod from the Tendaguru beds of Tanzania and a discussion on the systematic value of procoelous caudal vertebrae in the Sauropoda. Palaeontographica A. 256, 25-76.
Tendaguria Bonaparte, Heinrich and Wild, 2000
T. tanzaniensis Bonaparte, Heinrich and Wild, 2000
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Upper Dinosaur Member of the Tendaguru Formation, Tanzania
Holotype
- (MB.R.2092.1, NB4) (~20 m) anterior dorsal vertebra
....(MB.R.2092.2, NB5) anterior dorsal vertebra
....(MB.R. coll.; lost) sacrum, ilium
Referred- ?(MB.R.2091.1-30, G1-G30) incomplete second caudal vertebra (96.6 mm), incomplete third caudal vertebra (104 mm), incomplete fourth caudal vertebra (110.7 mm), incomplete fifth caudal vertebra (117.9 mm), incomplete sixth caudal vertebra (121 mm), partial seventh caudal vertebra (129.2 mm), incomplete eighth caudal vertebra (132.4 mm), incomplete ninth caudal vertebra (134.8 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (137.3 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (141.4 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (150.8 mm), thirteenth caudal vertebra (145 mm), fourteenth caudal vertebra (148.4 mm), fifteenth caudal vertebra (143.4 mm), sixteenth caudal vertebra (144.5 mm), seventeeth caudal vertebra (137.5 mm), eighteenth caudal vertebra (134.7 mm), nineteeth caudal vertebra (133.5 mm), twentieth caudal vertebra (131.3 mm), twenty-first caudal vertebra (~130.4 mm), twenty-second caudal vertebra (~133 mm), twenty-third caudal vertebra (134.9 mm), twenty-fourth caudal vertebra, twenty-fifth caudal vertebra (~140 mm), twenty-sixth caudal vertebra, twenty-seventh caudal vertebra (~169 mm), twenty-eighth caudal vertebra (~177.8 mm), twenty-ninth caudal vertebra (~179 mm), thirtieth caudal vertebra, thirty-first caudal vertebra, two incomplete chevrons (Janensch, 1929)
(MB.R.2091.31, G45) eighth or ninth cervical vertebra (Bonaparte, Heinrich and Wild, 2000)
?(MB.R.2094, Oa12) sixth caudal vertebra (234 mm) (Janensch, 1929)
Diagnosis- (after Bonaparte et al., 2000) anterior dorsal vertebrae opisthocoelous; neural spines low, continuous with diapophysis and anteroposteriorly laminar; neural spines do not rise above neural arch; diapophysis elongated with dorsal depression lateral to prezygapophysis; diapophysis with deep anterior cavities and shallower posterior cavities; well developed infradiapophyseal laminae; epipophyses strong and thick, near dorsalmost border of vertebra and connect with diapophyses.
Comments- Discovered between 1909 and 1912. First referred to Janenschia robusta (as Gigantosaurus robustus) by Janensch (1929), they may actually belong to that species. Bonaparte et al. (2000) assigned it to a new neosauropod family, but preliminary analyses suggest it may be related to near-neosauropod taxa like Jobaria and Cetiosaurus instead. The caudal series is only tentatively referred because it was associated with MB.R.2091.31.
References- Janensch, 1929. Material und Formegehalt der Sauropoden in der Ausbeute der Tendaguru-Expedition, 1909-1912. Palaeontographica. Supplement VII(1), 2(1), 3-34.
Bonaparte, Heinrich and Wild, 2000. Review of Janenschia Wild, with the description of a new sauropod from the Tendaguru beds of Tanzania and a discussion on the systematic value of procoelous caudal vertebrae in the Sauropoda. Palaeontographica A. 256, 25-76.

Ferganasaurus

Klamelisaurinae Zhao, 1993
Reference- Zhao, 1993. A new mid-Jurassic sauropod (Klamelisaurus gobiensis gen. et sp. nov.) from Xinjiang, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 31(2), 132-138.
Klamelisaurus

"Lancangosaurus" Zhao, 1980
= "Lancanjiangosaurus" Zhao, 1983
= "Lancangjiangosaurus" Zhao, 1985
= "Lanchangjiangosaurus" Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006
"L. cachuensis" Zhao, 1985
Etymology- The genus references the Lancang Jiang, the local name for the head of the Mekong River. The species name refers to the Zaqu River, which is the upper reaches of the Mekong.
Middle Jurassic
Middle Dapuka Group, Dabuka, Qamdo County, Tibet, China
Material
- (~15 m) specimen including skull, mandible, twelve teeth and limb elements
specimen (Fang et al., 2006)
Comments- Though usually believed to be a preliminary name for Datousaurus (e.g. Olshevsky, 1991), "Lancangosaurus" was first reported by Zhao (1980) in relation to a Dapuka specimen, not the Xiashaximiao Datousaurus. Listed characters are large skull, large spatulate teeth which decrease gradually in size posteriorly, a thick mandible and robust limbs. Dong et al. (1983) believed the teeth were congeneric with those from the Wujiaba Quarry of the Shangshaximiao Formation, which they described as belonging to Omeisaurus junghsiensis and O. fuxiensis. Zhao (1985) figures teeth in situ, though the photograph is unclear. Note Olshevsky (1991) switched the authorship for the variants "Lancanjiangosaurus" and "Lancangjiangosaurus". Glut (1997) incorrectly listed it as being Late Jurassic in age. Fang et al. (2006) note additional material from lower in the same formation. Given the etymology, either "Lancangosaurus" or "Lancangjiangosaurus" would be the most accurate names.
Relationships- "Lancanjiangosaurus" was stated by Zhao (1983) to be a bothrosauropodoid, in which he includes spatulate-toothed taxa like camarasaurids and brachiosaurids. Zhao (1985) notes it is a sauropod similar to Cetiosaurus. Chure and McIntosh (1989) listed it as a cetiosaurid, as does Olshevsky (1991) provisionally, while Lambert (1990) listed it as a brachiosaurid. Glut (1997) merely referred it to Sauropoda incertae sedis. Most recently, Fang et al. (2006) place it in Cetiosauridae. The known characters are found in both basal eusauropods like Omeisaurus and camarasaurids, though the age, locality and Zhao's opinion all favor the former identification. Whether Dong et al. are correct in placing it close to Omeisaurus is unknown, and for now I recommend keeping it as Eusauropoda incertae sedis.
References- Zhao, 1980. [Mesozoic vertebrate-bearing beds and stratigraphy of northern Xinjinag: Report of Paleontological Expedition to Xinjiang IV.] Memoirs of the Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology, Academia Sinica A. 15, 1-119.
Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983. [Dinosaurs from the Jurassic of Sichuan]. Palaeontologica Sinica, New Series C. 162(23), 1-136.
Zhao, 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 28(1-2), 295-306.
Zhao, 1985. The Jurassic Reptilia. In Wang, Cheng and Wang (eds.). The Jurassic System of China. Stratigraphy of China. 11, 286-289, 347, plates 10 and 11.
Chure and McIntosh, 1989. A Bibliography of the Dinosauria (Exclusive of the Aves) 1677-1986. Museum of Western Colorado Paleontology Series #1. 226 pp.
Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book. New York: Avon Books. 320 pp.
Olshevsky, 1991. A Revision of the Parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, Excluding the Advanced Crocodylia. Mesozoic Meanderings. 2, 196 pp.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076 pp.
Martin-Rolland, 1999. Les sauropodes chinois [The Chinese sauropods]. Revue Paléobiologie, Genève. 18(1), 287-315.
Fang, Zhang, Lu, Han, Zhao and Li, 2006. Collision between the Indian Plate and the paleo-Asian late and the appearance of Asian dinosaurs. Geological Bulletin of China. 25(7), 862-873.

Mamenchisauridae Young and Chao, 1972
= Omeisauridae Wilson, 2002
Definition- (Mamenchisaurus constructus <- Saltasaurus loricatus) (Naish and Martill, 2007)
References- Young and Chao, 1972. [Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis sp. nov.]. Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology Monographs, Series A. 8, 1-30.
Wilson, 2002. Sauropod dinosaur phylogeny: Critique and cladistic analysis. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 136, 217-276.
Naish and Martill, 2007. Dinosaurs of Great Britain and the role of the Geological Society of London in their discovery: Basal Dinosauria and Saurischia. Journal of the Geological Society, London. 164, 493-510.

Omeisaurus Young, 1939
O. jiaoi Jiang, Li, Peng and Ye, 2011
Aalenian-Bajocian, Middle Jurassic
Xiashaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China
Holotype
- (ZDM 5050) first dorsal vertebra (260 mm), second dorsal vertebra (210 mm), third dorsal vertebra (220 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (210 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (220 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (200 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (210 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (207 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (205 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (203 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra ( 195mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra, several dorsal ribs, five sacral vertebrae, first caudal vertebra (110 mm), second caudal vertebra (93 mm), third caudal vertebra (100 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (110 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (115 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (115 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (117 mm), eighth caudal vertebra (115 mm), ninth caudal vertebra (120 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (120 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (115 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (117 mm), thirteenth caudal vertebra (123 mm), fourteenth caudal vertebra (120 mm), fifteenth caudal vertebra (120 mm), sixteenth caudal vertebra (121 mm), seventeenth caudal vertebra (128 mm), eighteenth caudal vertebra (128 mm), nineteenth caudal vertebra (124 mm), twentieth caudal vertebra (120 mm), twenty-first caudal vertebra (120 mm), twenty-second caudal vertebra (125 mm), twenty-third caudal vertebra (120 mm), twenty-fourth caudal vertebra (120 mm), twenty-fifth caudal vertebra (115 mm), twenty-sixth caudal vertebra (115 mm), twenty-seventh caudal vertebra, twenty-eighth caudal vertebra , twenty-ninth caudal vertebra, twenty-five chevrons, partial scapula (~1.62 m), coracoid, clavicle, humeri (1.16, 1.12 m), radii (840, 820 mm), ulnae (~840, 875 mm), two carpals, metacarpal I (190 mm), metacarpal II (250 mm), metacarpal III (265 mm), metacarpal IV (225 mm), metacarpal V, ilium (~940 mm), pubis, ischium (780 mm), femora (1.4 m), tibiae (875, 900 mm), fibulae (900, 935 mm), astragali, metatarsal I, metatarsal II, metatarsal III, metatarsal IV, phalanges, unguals
Diagnosis- (after Jiang et al., 2011; note this is from the English abstract, the Chinese actual diagnosis may include only a portion of these) dorsal vertebrae tall and large; anterior dorsal vertebrae (1 to 6) opisthocoelous; dorsal pleurocoels well developed except for first; dorsal neural spines club-like; anterior dorsal neural spines not bifurcated; caudal vertebrae relatively short and thick; proximal caudal vertebrae slightly amphicoelous; first chevron articulated to first caudal; first chevron shallow and small; first caudal rib laterally directed, slightly fan-shaped; humerofemoral ratio ~.83; humerus long and straight, with slightly expanded proximal end and greatly expanded distal end; deltopectoral crest well-developed and low; ulnohumeral ratio ~.72; femur slender, with greatly expanded proximal and distal ends; fourth trochanter well-developed; tibiofemoral ratio ~.63.
Comments- This was discovered in 2000. The description has yet to be translated to English and the taxon has not been analyzed cladistically.
Reference- Jiang, Li, Peng and Ye, 2011. A new species of Omeisaurus from the Middle Jurassic of Zigong, Sichuan. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 49(2), 185-194.

Huangshanlong Huang, You, Yang and Ren, 2014
H. anhuiensis Huang, You, Yang and Ren, 2014
Middle Jurassic
Hongqin Formation, Anhui, China
Holotype
- (Anhui Paleontological Museum AGB5818) humerus (900 mm), radius (520 mm), ulna (600 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Huang et al., 2014) transverse length of proximal humerus 36% of humeral length; accessory processes near middle of anterodistal humerus; radiohumeral ratio 58% of that of the humerus; ulnohumeral ratio 67%; ulnar anteromedial process longer than anterolateral process; ridges on anterior, anteromedial and posterolateral faces of distal ulna.
Comments- The material was discovered in 2002. Huang et al. (2014) described it as a new taxon belonging to Mamenchisauridae based on several characters, but without a phylogenetic analysis.
Reference- Huang, You, Yang and Ren, 2014. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Huangshan, Anhui Province. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 52(4), 390-400.

Qijianglong Xing, Miyashita, Zhang, Li, Ye, Sekiya, Wang and Currie, 2015
Q. guokr Xing, Miyashita, Zhang, Li, Ye, Sekiya, Wang and Currie, 2015
Late Jurassic
Suining Formation, Chongqing, China
Holotype
- (QJGPM 1001) (subadult) partial skull, atlantal intercentrum, axis (143.1 mm), third cervical vertebra (256 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (230 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (310 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (350 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (325 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (305 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (330 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (324 mm), eleventh cervical vertebra (394 mm), twelfth cervical vertebra (345 mm), thirteenth cervical vertebra (373 mm), fourteenth cervical vertebra (348 mm), fifteenth cervical vertebra (398 mm), sixteenth cervical vertebra (334 mm), seventeeth cervical vertebra (312 mm), first dorsal vertebra, second dorsal vertebra, third dorsal vertebra, fourth dorsal vertebra, fifth dorsal vertebra, sixth dorsal vertebra, dorsal rib fragments, ~tenth caudal vertebra, twenty-seven mid-distal (~15-41) caudal vertebrae, neural arch fragments, chevron fragments, pubis, two pedal phalanges ?-1
Diagnosis- (after Xing et al., 2015) subequal anteroposterior lengths of frontal and parietal (also in Omeisaurus and Shunosaurus); parietal forming entire anterior margin of supratemporal fenestra (also in Atlasaurus and Omeisaurus); absence of frontoparietal fenestra and presence of postparietal foramen (also in Spinophorosaurus); plate-like basipterygoid process oriented anteroventrally with accessory tuber paralleling basal tuber; finger-like process lateral to postzygapophyses in cervical vertebrae; pneumatopores in spinodiapophyseal fossa in posterior cervical vertebrae; anterior outline of neural spines of mid-caudal vertebra indented posteriorly for more than half length of centrum (also in Mamenchisaurus); pubis anteriorly concave such that distal end points more anteriorly than ventrally.
Comments- The specimen was discovered in 2006. Xing et al. (2016) recovered the taxon as a mamenchisaurid in a trichtomy with Chuanjiesaurus and Mamenchisaurus+Yuanmousaurus.
Reference- Xing, Miyashita, Zhang, Li, Ye, Sekiya, Wang and Currie, 2015. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of China and the diversity, distribution, and relationships of mamenchisaurids. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 35(1), e889701.

Mamenchisaurinae Young and Chao, 1972 vide McIntosh, 1990
Comments- McIntosh (1990) used Mamenchisaurinae in both of his 1990 works, but which was published first is uncertain.
References- Young and Chao, 1972. [Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis sp. nov.]. Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology Monographs, Series A. 8, 1-30.
McIntosh, 1990. Species determination in sauropod dinosaurs with tentative suggestions for their classification. In Carpenter and Currie (eds.). Dinosaur Systematics: Perspectives and Approaches. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 53-69.
McIntosh, 1990. Sauropoda. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds). The Dinosauria, Berkeley: University of California Press. 345-401.
Mamenchisaurus

Tonganosaurus Li, Yang, Liu and Wang, 2010
T. hei Li, Yang, Liu and Wang, 2010
Early Jurassic
Yimen Formation, Sichuan, China
Holotype
- (MCDUT 14454) anterior axis, third cervical vertebra (168 mm), posterior fourth cervical centrum, posterior fifth cervical vertebra, seventeenth cervical centrum (147 mm), second dorsal vertebra (140 mm), fourth dorsal centrum (118 mm), eighth dorsal centrum (126 mm), ninth dorsal centrum (114 mm), tenth dorsal centrum (110 mm), eleventh dorsal centrum (110 mm), partial first caudal vertebra (88 mm), second caudal vertebra (90 mm), third caudal vertebra (89 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (90 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (97 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (100 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (106 mm), partial eighth caudal vertebra (110 mm), ten neural spine and rib fragments, scapulae (one fragmentary; 760 mm), coracoid (208 mm), sternum (300 mm), humerus (628 mm), radius (498 mm), ulna (520 mm), ischia (570, 573 mm), femora (one partial; 840 mm), tibia (562 mm), fibula (566 mm), metatarsal I (109 mm), pedal ungual I (170 mm), metatarsal II (166 mm), metatarsal III (153 mm), metatarsal V (125 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Li et al., 2010) all presacrals pleurocoelous; presacral bone texture solid, not cancellous; pleurocoels large and deep; cervical centra slender; cervical centra ventrally keeled; posterior cervical centra with well developed laminae and fossae; dorsal vertebrae with well developed laminae and pleurocoels; cervical and anterior dorsal centra opisthocoelous; mid dorsal centra platycoelous; posterior dorsal and caudal centra amphicoelous; forelimb/hindlimb ratio 0.80; humerus straight and robust; deltopectoral crest well developed; femur straight and robust; fourth trochanter well developed.
Comments- Found in 2007. Assigned by Li et al. to Mamenchisauridae, specifically closest to Omeisaurus. However, this has yet to be validated by a cladistic analysis.
Reference- Li, Yang, Liu and Wang, 2010. A new sauropod from the Lower Jurassic of Huili, Sichuan, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 48(3),185-202.

Xinjiangtitan Wu, Zhou, Wings, Sekiya and Dong, 2013
X. shanshanensis Wu, Zhou, Wings, Sekiya and Dong, 2013
Bathonian-Oxfordian, Middle-Late Jurassic
Qigu Formation, Xinjiang, China
Holotype
- (SSV12001) (~30-32 m) penultimate cervical vertebra (960 mm excl. condyle), last cervical vertebra (690 mm excl. condyle), several partial cervical ribs, first dorsal vertebra (365 mm excl. condyle), second dorsal vertebra (290 mm excl. condyle), third dorsal vertebra (265 mm excl. condyle), fourth dorsal vertebra (255 mm excl. condyle), (5th-8th combined 1.35 m excl. condyle) fifth dorsal vertebra, sixth dorsal vertebra, seventh dorsal vertebra, eighth dorsal vertebra, ninth dorsal vertebra (305 mm excl. condyle), tenth dorsal vertebra (230 mm excl. condyle), eleventh dorsal vertebra (320 mm excl. condyle), twelfth dorsal vertebra (340 mm excl. condyle), several partial dorsal ribs, synsacrum (245, 260, 240, 270, 200 mm), first caudal vertebra (210 mm), second caudal vertebra (220 mm), pubes, proximal ischium, femur (1.65 m), tibia (80 mm), fibula, metatarsal IV or V
Diagnosis- (after Wu et al., 2013) ventral median keel and hypapophysis on penultimate cervical centrum; last two cervical vertebrae highly elongated (combined 63% of femur+tibia); sacracostal yoke developed except for first rib; robust femur (transverse width of distal end 33% of length).
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 2012. When entered into Harris' sauropod matrix, Xinjiangtitan emerged sister to Mamenchisaurus (coded as a single OTU), with Omeisaurus less closely related.
Reference- Wu, Zhou, Wings, Sekiya and Dong, 2013. A new gigantic sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Shanshan, Xinjiang. Global Geology. 32(3), 437-446.

Tienshanosaurus Young, 1937
T. chitaiensis Young, 1937
= Euhelopus chitaiensis (Young, 1937) Martin-Rolland, 1999
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Shishugou Formation, Xinjiang, China
Holotype
- (IVPP AS 40002-3) cervical vertebra (330 mm), cervical central fragment, partial posterior cervical vertebra (~250 mm), two cervical rib fragments, partial posterior dorsal vertebra, posterior dorsal vertebra (120 mm), posterior dorsal vertebra (105 mm), dorsal neural arch, several dorsal rib fragments, sacral fragment, partial first caudal vertebra, second caudal vertebra, partial third caudal vertebra, fourth caudal neural arch fragment, incomplete fifth caudal vertebra (108 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (110 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (105 mm), eighth caudal vertebra (90 mm), ninth caudal vertebra (95 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (98 mm), incomplete eleventh caudal vertebra (96 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (93 mm), thirteenth caudal vertebra (90 mm), fourteenth caudal vertebra (93 mm), incomplete fifteenth caudal vertebra (94 mm), partial sixteenth caudal vertebra (101 mm), partial twenty-eighth caudal vertebra, twenty-ninth caudal vertebra (93 mm), thirtieth caudal vertebra (101 mm), thirty-first caudal centrum (97 mm), thirty-second caudal vertebra (91 mm), thirty-third caudal vertebra (89 mm), thirty-fourth caudal vertebra (89 mm), thirty-fifth caudal vertebra (90 mm), thirty-sixth caudal vertebra (86 mm), thirty-seventh caudal central fragment, six caudal vertebrae, caudal neural spines, two proximal chevrons, chevrons, incomplete scapula (995 mm), coracoids (one partial, one incomplete), incomplete humerus (680 mm), proximal radius, distal radius or ulna, incomplete ilia (570, 565 mm), distal pubic fragment, ischia (one partial; 560 mm), proximal femur, distal ?femoral fragment, proximal tibia, distal fibula
Referred- ?(IVPP V8301) seventh cervical vertebra, eighth cervical vertebra, ninth cervical vertebra, tenth cervical vertebra, cervical ribs, seventeen mid caudal vertebrae, chevrons (Dong, 1990)
Late Jurassic
Lamalishan, Xinjiang, China

?(IVPP V932) twentieth caudal vertebra (135 mm) (Young, 1958)
Diagnosis- (after Young, 1937) size moderate; scapula moderately strong, weakly expanded distally; shaft subequal in length with the expanded part plus coracoid; rather short forelimb; ilium with very open anterior embayment; pelvic peduncle set forward; acetabulum perforated but with a broad bony marginal area; ischium massive but not distally expanded; fourth trochanter of femur weak or missing.
(after Dong, 1990) euhelopodid-style cervical vertebrae with long and opisthocoelous centra, ventrally flat and lacking keels; neural spines are low, or pseudospinus; large and long cervical ribs.
Comments- Discovered in 1930. Originally placed as a euhelopodid or camarasaurid, based on a revised version of Wilson's analysis it may be closer to basal taxa like Tazoudasaurus and Spinophorosaurus. It certainly seems to differ from Euhelopus (e.g. in its amphicoelous dorsals) and would have priority over the genus anyway, contra Martin-Rolland (1999).
References- Young, 1937. A new dinosaurian from Sinkiang. Palaeontologia Sinica. 105(2), 1-29.
Young, 1958. New sauropods from China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 2(1), 1-28.
Dong, 1990. Sauropoda from the Kelameili Region of the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang Autonomous Region. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 28(1), 43-58.
Martin-Rolland, 1999. Les sauropodes chinois. Revue Paléobiologie. 18(1), 287-315.

Losillasaurus

Turiasauria Royo-Torres, Cobos and Alcalá, 2006
Definition- (Turiasaurus riodevensis <- Saltasaurus loricatus) (Royo-Torres et al., 2006)
Reference- Royo-Torres, Cobos and Alcalá, 2006. A giant European dinosaur and a new sauropod clade. Science. 314, 1925-1927.

Turiasaurus

Zby Mateus, Mannion and Upchurch, 2014
Z. atlanticus Mateus, Mannion and Upchurch, 2014
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Amoreira-Porto Novo Member of Lourinha Formation, Portugal
Holotype
- (ML 368) tooth (38x28x14 mm), mid-posterior cervical neural arch fragment, incomplete proximal chevron, proximal scapula, coracoid (569 mm), humerus (1.53 m), radius (1.04 m), ulna (1.06 m), metacarpal I (365 mm), phalanx I-1 (82 mm), manual ungual I (172 mm), phalanx ?II-1 (47 mm), metacarpal III (398 mm), metacarpal IV (382 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Mateus et al., 2014) posterior margin of scapula just proximal to blade at an abrupt angle (~110 degrees) to proximalmost posterior margin of scapular blade; humerus expands both anteriorly and posteriorly at the distal half of the deltopectoral crest, due to a prominent posterior bulge; laterodistal corner of humerus forms an anteroposteriorly thin flange that does not expand as far anteriorly as the rest of the distal end; manual ungual I subrectangular in lateral view.
Comments- The holotype was discovered in 1996 and initially referred to Turiasaurus riodevensis in an abstract (Mateus, 2009) before being described as a new taxon (Mateus et al., 2014). However, the seven distinguishing characters listed by the latter authors are only determinable in the holotypes of each species. As Turiasaurus is only slightly later (Middle-Late Tithonian) and also from the Iberian peninsula, it seems plausible the taxa are synonymous, though this will require further comparable material to test.
Reference- Mateus, 2009. The sauropod dinosaur Turiasaurus riodevensis in the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29(3), 144A.
Mateus, Mannion and Upchurch, 2014. Zby atlanticus, a new turiasaurian sauropod (Dinosauria, Eusauropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34(3), 618-634.

Neosauropoda Bonaparte, 1986
= Homalosauropodidae Janensch, 1929
= Homalosauropodoidea Janensch, 1929 vide Kuhn, 1961
Definition- (Diplodocus longus + Camarasaurus supremus) (modified from Salgado et al., 1997)
Other definitions- (Diplodocus longus + Saltasaurus loricatus) (Wilson, 2005; modified from Wilson and Sereno, 1998)
Comments- Janensch (1929) erected Homalosauropodidae (which is invalid, as there is no genus Homalosauropus) for dicraeosaurines, apatosaurines, diplodocines and titanosaurines.
References- Janensch, 1929. Material und Formegehalt der Sauropoden in der Ausbeute der Tendaguru-Expedition, 1909-1912 [Material and figured content of sauropods in the yield of the Tendaguru Expedition, 1909-1912]. Palaeontographica. Supplement VII (1), 2(1), 3-34.
Kuhn, 1961. Die Familien der rezenten und fossilen Amphibien und Reptilien. Verlaghus Meisenbach KG, Bamberg. 79 pp.
Bonaparte, 1986. Les Dinosaures (Carnosaures, Allosauridés, Sauropodes, Cétiosauridés) du Jurassique moyen de Cerro Condor (Chubut, Argentine). Annales de Paléontologie. 72, 247-289, 325-386.
Salgado, Coria and Calvo, 1997. Evolution of titanosaurid sauropods. I: Phylogenetic analysis based on the postcranial evidence. Ameghiniana. 34(1), 3-32.
Wilson and Sereno, 1998. Early evolution and higher-level phylogeny of sauropod dinosaurs. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Memoir 5. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(2 suppl), 68 pp.
Wilson, 2005. Overview of sauropod phylogeny and evolution. in Curry Rogers and Wilson (eds.). The Sauropods: Evolution and Paleobiology. University of California Press, Berkeley. 15-49.

Haplocanthosauridae Bonaparte, 1999
Reference- Bonaparte, 1999. Evolución de las vértebras presacras en Sauropodomorpha [Evolution of the presacral vertebrae in Sauropodomorpha]. Ameghiniana. 36(2), 115-187.
Haplocanthosaurus

Jobaria

Diplodocoidea

Macronaria

Neosauropoda incertae sedis

Atlantosauridae Marsh, 1877
Atlantosaurinae Marsh, 1877 vide Steel, 1970
References- Marsh, 1877. Notice of new dinosaurian reptiles from the Jurassic formation. American Journal of Science and Arts. 14, 514-516.
Steel, 1970. Part 14. Saurischia. Handbuch der Paläoherpetologie/Encyclopedia of Paleoherpetology. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart. 87 pp.
Atlantosaurus

Bothriospondylidae Lydekker, 1895
Reference- Lydekker, 1895. On bones of a sauropodous dinosaur from Madagascar. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London. 51, 329-336.
Bothriospondylus

"Ischyrosaurus" Hulke, 1874 (preoccupied Cope, 1869)
"I." manseli Hulke vide Lydekker, 1888
= Ornithopsis manseli Lydekker 1888
= Pelorosaurus manseli (Lydekker, 1888) Lydekker, 1890
Early Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Maple Ledge Shales of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, England
Holotype
- (BMNH R41626) incomplete humerus (~770 mm)
Comments- Discovered in 1868. Note Cope (1869) unecessarily renamed the plesiosaur Ischyrotherium Ischyrosaurus, which predates Hulke's name. Barrett et al. (2010) determined it was most likely a rebbachisaurid or basal titanosauriform so referred it to Neosauropoda incertae sedis.
References- Cope, 1869. Synopsis of the extinct Batrachia and Reptilia of North America. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society. 14, 1-252.
Hulke, 1969. Note on a large saurian humerus from the Kimmeridge Clay of the Dorset Coast. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society. 25, 386-389.
Hulke, 1874. Note on a very large saurian limb-bone adapted for progression on land, from the Kimmeridge Clay of Weymouth, Dorset. Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society. 30, 16-17.
Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History). Part I. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria. British Museum (Natural History), London. 309 pp.
Lydekker, 1890. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum. Part IV. Containing the orders Anomodontia, Ecaudata, Caudata and Labyrinthodontia; and Supplement. British Museum (Natural History), London. 295 pp.
Barrett, Benson and Upchurch, 2010. Dinosaurs of Dorset: Part II, the sauropod dinosaurs (Saurischia, Sauropoda) with additional comments on the theropods. Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society. 131, 113-126.

Ultrasaurus Kim, 1983
= "Ultrasaurus" Kim, 1981
U. tabriensis Kim, 1983
Aptian-Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Gugyedong Formation, South Korea
Holotype
- (DGBU-1973) proximal humerus (435 mm wide)
Referred- ?(DGBU coll.) caudal neural spine (Kim, 1983)
? rib fragments (Kim, 1988)
? cervical vertebra (Kim, 1988)
Comments- Discovered in 1977, initially identified as a sauropod femur or tibia (Chang et al., 1982) or a proximal brachiosaurid ulna (Kim, 1981, 1983). Paul (1988) notes it is actually a proximal humerus. All modern authors have considered it an indeterminate sauropod, though as Barrett et al. (2002) note, the absence of a well-developed proximolateral humeral process excludes it from Somphospondyli. The Cretaceous age may indicate it is a neosauropod.
References- Kim, 1981. Cretaceous dinosaur fossils discovered from two dinosaur sites of Korea. Journal of the Geological Society of Korea. 17, 297.
Chang, Seo and Park, 1982. Occurrence of a dinosaur limb bone near Tabri, southern Korea. Journal of the Geological Society of Korea. 18, 195-202.
Kim, 1983. Cretaceous dinosaurs from South Korea. Journal of the Geological Society of Korea. 19(3), 115-126.
Kim, 1988. Excavations and studies of dinosaur skeletons of Korea. Abstracts at the Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Korea. 4(2), 168-169.
Paul, 1988. The brachiosaur giants of the Morrison and Tendaguru with a description of a new subgenus, Giraffatitan, and a comparison of the world's largest dinosaurs. Hunteria. 2, 1-14.
Lee, 1997. Reassessment of Ultrasaurus tabriensis, Kim 1983 and the significance of Korean Sauropoda. Abstracts at the Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Korea. pg 14.
Lee, Yang and Park, 1997. Sauropod dinosaur remains from the Gyeongsang Supergroup, Korea. Paleontological Society of Korea, Special Publication. 2, 103-114.
Barrett, Hasegawa, Manabe, Isaji and Matsuoka, 2002. Sauropod dinosaurs from the Lower Cretaceous of eastern Asia: Taxonomic and biogeographic implications. Palaeontology. 45, 1197-1217.

Xenoposeidon